History ButtMonkey / Sports

21st May '17 11:39:18 AM megachao24
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* San Antonio: Unlike most examples here, since the Spurs are [[TheJuggernaut a dominate force in the NBA]], the city has the major issue of having difficulty attracting major league teams to even to come to the city ''at all'' despite the city (alongside neighboring Austin) one of the fastest growing cities in the U.S. Every attempt at attracting either a NFL, MLB, NHL or MLS team have either been blocked, imploded or lack the necessary stadium to accommodate them. The NFL issue has been a massive sore spot for fans of football as [[ExecutiveMeddling Jerry Jones has gone to great lengths to strangle the city out of the league]] despite the endless hunger for the sport there.
10th May '17 7:25:49 PM igordebraga
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*** 2016 and 2017 seemed different, only to end all too familiar: the Caps had the best regular season, struggled a bit in the opening round, and then faced the powerhouse Pittsburgh Penguins, who opened 3-1, and had Washington attempt to claw a comeback before being killed in Game 6 overtime in one year, and Game 7 third period ''at home'' in the other. [[https://twitter.com/Steelo626/status/862489482460749824 Things never change with the Capitals, it seems.]]
8th May '17 8:59:25 PM igordebraga
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*** Brazil: In Sao Paulo, Santos is (surprisingly) this compared to Corinthians, Palmeiras, and Sao Paulo FC [[note]]Fans of the latter three teams view Santos as a "Widow" which couldn't succeed without their shining stars Pele and Neymar [[/note]]. In Rio, Botafogo is this compared to Flamengo, Vasco da Gama, and Fluminense.

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*** Brazil: In Sao Paulo, Santos is (surprisingly) this compared to Corinthians, Palmeiras, and Sao Paulo FC [[note]]Fans of the latter three teams view Santos as a "Widow" which couldn't succeed without their shining stars Pele Pelé and Neymar [[/note]]. In Rio, Botafogo is this compared to Flamengo, Vasco da Gama, and Fluminense.



** The Hawks have been equally inconsistent since their arrival in Atlanta in 1968 (prior to this, they were in St. Louis, where they won a championship in 1958[[note]]And since the franchise is waiting ever since, it's the second longest drought in the NBA, behind the Sacramento Kings franchise since 1951, when they were the Rochester Royals[[/note]]). The Hawks' first permanent arena in Atlanta, the Omni Coliseum, despite being innovative for its time, was literally a rust bucket. The arena was built with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weathering_steel weathering steel]] as part of its load bearing structure, with the steel intentionally forming a thin layer of rust to seal itself; however, the engineers who designed the arena failed to account for Altanta's humid climate, meaning the steel had rusted more than intended. The arena was also built on a former railroad yard, and unanticipated settling caused further stress to the structure. The Omni's rapid deterioration led to its subsequent demolition and replacement by Philips Arena in the late 1990s. The Hawks' most recent ex-owners, Atlanta Spirit, had been a circus, with the group getting involved in numerous external and internal lawsuits, selling off the NHL's Thrashers to opportunistic Canadians in 2011, and then-GM Danny Ferry and then-controlling owner Bruce Levenson were found to have made racist comments about Luol Deng, a Sudanese-born player, and the black majority fanbase in Atlanta, respectively in 2012 and 2014; the latter incident occurred not long after the NBA ousted ex-Clippers owner Donald Sterling for his three decades of racist behavior. The final season under Atlanta Spirit was ironically the team's best: they finished atop the Eastern Conference, and got to the Conference Finals for the first time ever. [[AntiClimax And then were swept by the Cavaliers.]] The next year, the Hawks again had a good season, won a playoff series, only for the Cavs to beat them 4-0 again, only one round earlier. (Add another sweep in 2009, and it seems Atlanta just can't handle [=LeBron=] James.)

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** The Hawks have been equally inconsistent since their arrival in Atlanta in 1968 (prior to this, they were in St. Louis, where they won a championship in 1958[[note]]And since the franchise is waiting ever since, it's the second longest drought in the NBA, behind the Sacramento Kings franchise since 1951, when they were the Rochester Royals[[/note]]). The Hawks' first permanent arena in Atlanta, the Omni Coliseum, despite being innovative for its time, was literally a rust bucket. The arena was built with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weathering_steel weathering steel]] as part of its load bearing structure, with the steel intentionally forming a thin layer of rust to seal itself; however, the engineers who designed the arena failed to account for Altanta's humid climate, meaning the steel had rusted more than intended. The arena was also built on a former railroad yard, and unanticipated settling caused further stress to the structure. The Omni's rapid deterioration led to its subsequent demolition and replacement by Philips Arena in the late 1990s. The Hawks' most recent ex-owners, Atlanta Spirit, had been a circus, with the group getting involved in numerous external and internal lawsuits, selling off the NHL's Thrashers to opportunistic Canadians in 2011, and then-GM Danny Ferry and then-controlling owner Bruce Levenson were found to have made racist comments about Luol Deng, a Sudanese-born player, and the black majority fanbase in Atlanta, respectively in 2012 and 2014; the latter incident occurred not long after the NBA ousted ex-Clippers owner Donald Sterling for his three decades of racist behavior. The final season under Atlanta Spirit was ironically the team's best: they finished atop the Eastern Conference, and got to the Conference Finals for the first time ever. [[AntiClimax And then were swept by the Cavaliers.]] The next year, the Hawks again had a good season, won a playoff series, only for the Cavs to beat them 4-0 again, only one round earlier. (Add another sweep in 2009, and it seems Atlanta just can't handle [=LeBron=] James.)) Then 2017 had the Hawks falling in round 1 to the same Washington Wizards they beat two years prior...



** [[FromBadToWorse As if 2015 wasn't bleak enough]], 2016 had the Clippers collapsing right in Round 1, opening 2-0 on Portland before losing 4 straight while Chris Paul and Blake Griffin were sidelined with injuries. Maybe TheSportsGuy was right to say [[http://espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/090624 Native Americans cursed the team?]] [[https://theringer.com/2017-nba-playoffs-chris-paul-los-angeles-clippers-last-days-of-point-god-15136ed190b2 He even had to write on the team woes again]] seeing the Clippers suffer in 2017 against the Utah Jazz.

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** [[FromBadToWorse As if 2015 wasn't bleak enough]], 2016 had the Clippers collapsing right in Round 1, opening 2-0 on Portland before losing 4 straight while Chris Paul and Blake Griffin were sidelined with injuries. Maybe TheSportsGuy was right to say [[http://espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/090624 Native Americans cursed the team?]] [[https://theringer.com/2017-nba-playoffs-chris-paul-los-angeles-clippers-last-days-of-point-god-15136ed190b2 He even had to write on the team woes again]] seeing the Clippers suffer a first round elimination in 2017 against to the Utah Jazz.
7th May '17 10:07:16 PM AreYouTyler
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*** If there's anything that'll make Charger fans cry, it's the fact that their in-state rivals, the San Francisco 49ers and the hated Oakland Raiders, have won Super Bowls [[note]] The Niners won Super Bowls XVI, XIX, XXIII, XXIV, and XXIX, and the Raiders won XI, XV, and XVIII [[/note]], while the Chargers haven't won a single one. The one time they did get into the Super Bowl (Super Bowl XXIX), they lost 26-49, by the San Francisco 49ers. [[note]] It is, however, noted that the 49ers at that time were a [[TheAce perennial powerhouse]] that boasted of Steve Young, Jerry Rice, Deion Sanders, John Taylor, Bryant Young, Rickey Jackson, Merton Hanks etc., while the Chargers were an unexpected playoff contender who upset the favored Miami Dolphins and Pittsburgh Stealers in the AFC playoffs with the strong and spirited play of Junior Seau, Stan Humphries, Natrone Means, and Mark Seay. It is also noted that the Niners crushed the Bolts, 38-15, in the regular season. [[/note]]. They haven't gone back since, despite the presence of talented players such as Philip Rivers, [=LaDainian=] Tomlinson, Antonio Gates, Shawne Merriman, and Eric Weddle.

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*** If there's anything that'll make Charger fans cry, it's the fact that their in-state rivals, the San Francisco 49ers and the hated Oakland Raiders, have won Super Bowls [[note]] The Niners won Super Bowls XVI, XIX, XXIII, XXIV, and XXIX, and the Raiders won XI, XV, and XVIII [[/note]], while the Chargers haven't won a single one. The one time they did get into the Super Bowl (Super Bowl XXIX), they lost 26-49, by the San Francisco 49ers. [[note]] It is, however, noted that the 49ers at that time were a [[TheAce perennial powerhouse]] that boasted of Steve Young, Jerry Rice, Deion Sanders, John Taylor, Bryant Young, Rickey Jackson, Merton Hanks etc., while the Chargers were an unexpected playoff contender who upset the favored Miami Dolphins and Pittsburgh Stealers Steelers in the AFC playoffs with the strong and spirited play of Junior Seau, Stan Humphries, Natrone Means, and Mark Seay. It is also noted that the Niners crushed the Bolts, 38-15, in the regular season. [[/note]]. They haven't gone back since, despite the presence of talented players such as Philip Rivers, [=LaDainian=] Tomlinson, Antonio Gates, Shawne Merriman, and Eric Weddle.



*** Since the Chargers' move to Los Angeles, the team has become the biggest joke in the NFL. The team was [[http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/18459733/chargers-new-la-based-mark-already-mocked-social-media ridiculed for its now quickly-abandoned alternative logo]], which looked like a cross between the Dodgers' and the Tampa Bay Lightning's logos. Before moving into the new Inglewood stadium for 2019, the Chargers will play in the MLS-specific [=StubHub=] Center, making it the smallest Super Bowl era stadium in the NFL. With the Rams' tepid reception in their first year back in Los Angeles, the Chargers' viability as the market's second team is put into serious doubt; even ''Clippers fans'' were [[http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/01/lakers-clippers-fans-booed-chargers-logo-los-angeles-welcome booing the Chargers' logo when it was shown on the Staples Center's videoboard]]. Despite pre-approving the Chargers' move to Los Angeles in 2016, the NFL and its owners are now showing remorse for the move. Dean Spanos has effectively become the most hated owner in the NFL since Art Modell moved the Browns to Baltimore.
** Their pro soccer team, the Sockers, were a formidable force in the 1970s and early 1980s. Why MLS never awarded a franchise to San Diego is baffling, to say the least! (California instead got a team in Los Angeles, with another to come in 2018, and one in San Jose. Also, there's Club Tijuana across the Mexican border in Liga MX.) However, with the Chargers move to LA, there's a greater push for a MLS franchise.

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*** Since the Chargers' move return to Los Angeles, the team has become the biggest joke in the NFL. The team was [[http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/18459733/chargers-new-la-based-mark-already-mocked-social-media ridiculed for its now quickly-abandoned alternative logo]], which looked like a cross between the Dodgers' and the Tampa Bay Lightning's logos. Before moving into the new Inglewood stadium for 2019, the Chargers will play in the MLS-specific [=StubHub=] Center, making it the smallest Super Bowl era stadium in the NFL. With the Rams' tepid reception in their first year back in Los Angeles, the Chargers' viability as the market's second team is put into serious doubt; even ''Clippers fans'' were [[http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/01/lakers-clippers-fans-booed-chargers-logo-los-angeles-welcome booing the Chargers' logo when it was shown on the Staples Center's videoboard]]. Despite pre-approving the Chargers' move to Los Angeles in 2016, the NFL and its owners are now showing remorse for the move. Dean Spanos has effectively become the most hated owner in the NFL since Art Modell moved the Browns to Baltimore.
** Their pro soccer team, the Sockers, were a formidable force in the 1970s and early 1980s. Why MLS never awarded a franchise to San Diego is baffling, to say the least! (California instead got a team in Los Angeles, Angeles[[note]]the second team, Chivas, folded after a few seasons[[/note]], with another to come in 2018, and one in San Jose. Also, there's Club Tijuana across the Mexican border in Liga MX.) However, with the Chargers move to LA, there's a greater push for a MLS franchise.
7th May '17 2:41:45 PM Gsueagle31049
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* UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}. The residents of the South Florida metropolitan area are infamous for their embarrassing indifference to their teams, only being attracted to "big name" star players and showing up when their teams win games consistently rather than showing actual dedication to their teams regardless of win-loss records; it also doesn't help that three of their four major league teams are still relatively new to their respective leagues (with the Heat founded in 1988 and both the Marlins and Panthers founded in 1993). Another major reason is that [[http://www.complex.com/sports/2016/07/miami-is-a-trash-sports-city the city itself has so many attractions outside of sports (such as the bustling nightlife, the beaches, etc.) that it's hard to even build up an actual dedicated fanbase for its pro teams, making it the East Coast equivalent of Las Vegas only without the gambling trappings]]. While the NBA's Heat has been a dominant team of late, the other three franchises are not so lucky, and two of them are often considered TheChewToy of their respective leagues.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}. The residents of the South Florida metropolitan area are infamous for their embarrassing indifference to their teams, only being attracted to "big name" star players and showing up when their teams win games consistently rather than showing actual dedication to their teams regardless of win-loss records; it also doesn't help that three of their four major league teams are still relatively new to their respective leagues (with the NBA's Heat founded in 1988 and both the Marlins and NHL's Panthers and MLB's Marlins founded in 1993). Another major reason is that [[http://www.complex.com/sports/2016/07/miami-is-a-trash-sports-city the city itself has so many attractions outside of sports (such as the bustling nightlife, the beaches, etc.) that it's hard to even build up an actual dedicated fanbase for its pro teams, making it the East Coast equivalent of Las Vegas only without the gambling trappings]]. While the NBA's Heat has been a dominant team of late, the other three franchises are not so lucky, and two of them are often considered TheChewToy of their respective leagues.



** The Florida Panthers actually started off pretty strong by expansion team standards, reaching the 1996 Stanley Cup Finals. Since then, however, the team has been an also ran, regularly finishing at or near the bottom in both the standings and in attendance. In over 20 years, the Panthers only qualified for the playoffs five times - only winning rounds in the Cinderella run, and the third and fourth were separated by a record 12 years. The Panthers, like any other struggling Sun Belt team, are often rumored to be a prime candidate for relocation. Still, the 2015-16 season [[http://www.givemesport.com/686052-why-the-florida-panthers-are-so-successful-this-season went]] particularly well, with the Panthers qualifying for the fifth time and winning the second division title, and the fact most players are young makes fans optimistic about a consistent team for a change... before 2016-17 had them crashing again.

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** The Florida Panthers actually started off pretty strong by expansion team standards, reaching the 1996 Stanley Cup Finals.Finals in only their third year of existence. Since then, however, the team has been an also ran, regularly finishing at or near the bottom in both the standings and in attendance. In over 20 years, the Panthers only qualified for the playoffs five times - only winning rounds in the Cinderella run, and the third and fourth were separated by a record 12 years. The Panthers, like any other struggling Sun Belt team, are often rumored to be a prime candidate for relocation. Still, the 2015-16 season [[http://www.givemesport.com/686052-why-the-florida-panthers-are-so-successful-this-season went]] particularly well, with the Panthers qualifying for the fifth time and winning the second division title, and the fact most players are young makes fans optimistic about a consistent team for a change... before 2016-17 had them crashing again.



** In their early years, the Raiders were a very competitive team under late owner Al Davis, and Davis was known for being bold and controversial as a owner/general manager. However, towards the end of Davis' life, the team became something of a joke. Since 2002, the team had ''nine'' different head coaches, [[note]]Bill Callahan, Norv Turner, Art Shell, Lane Kiffin, Tom Cable, Hue Jackson, Dennis Allen, Tony Sparano, and Jack Del Rio[[/note]] and the team had not finished with a record better than 8-8 until 2016; however, in their first playoff appearance in over a decade, the Raiders were an early out due to injuries at the quarterback position. Prior to and since Al Davis' death, the Raiders have been trying to replace the antiquated Coliseum to no avail. Los Angeles is off the table for relocation, since the Rams won the right to return to LA in 2016, and the rival Chargers had a provision to join them within the following year and subsequently exercised that right since they failed get their own long obsolete stadium in San Diego replaced. After mulling a move to San Antonio, the Raiders received league approval to move to Las Vegas by 2020; however, Las Vegas' small media market and legal gambling industry, as noted above, are potential concerns. A move to Sacramento would have kept most of the Raiders' existing fanbase in Oakland within a two to three hour drive, and Sacramento is the second largest media market without an NFL franchise; however, Sacramento lacks a large corporate presence, since most of the city's economy, as the California state capital, is centered around the local, county, and state governments. On top of that, a new stadium would be needed; Sacramento's largest stadium[[note]]Hornet Stadium, home to the [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball FCS-level]] Sacramento State Hornets[[/note]] doesn't even hold 22,000. The Raiders plan to stay in Oakland as a lame duck team for at least 2017 and 2018 while the new Las Vegas stadium is under construction; however, considering that the late Bud Adams tried to do the same thing with the then-Houston Oilers before moving to Nashville two decades ago, history may likely repeat. If a sharp decline in attendance doesn't force the Raiders out of Oakland early, a spurned Oakland city council voiding the Raiders' lease at the Oakland Coliseum almost certainly will.
** While the Athletics have been fairly competitive in their time in Oakland, their Butt Monkey status lies primarily with the Coliseum, where they have played since moving to Oakland in 1968. Aside from the stadium's aforementioned issues, the stadium's baseball configuration has the largest amount of foul territory in the majors, even by the standards of 1960s[=/=]70s-era multipurpose stadiums, meaning that foul balls which would end up in the seats and out of play at another ballpark can, and often will, be caught for an out; also, this puts fans sitting in the lower bowl further away from the action. Many Athletics fans hate the Mount Davis grandstand, which was constructed in the mid-1990s to lure the Raiders back to Oakland; Mount Davis took away the picturesque view of the Oakland hills which served as the backdrop for Athletics' games. The Athletics have tried to move out of the Coliseum and into their own ballpark either in Santa Clara, San Jose or Fremont; however, the San Francisco Giants claim territorial rights on those cities and they refuse to cede any of them to the Athletics. If the A's can't secure a new ballpark in Oakland, even with the Raiders' and Warriors' imminent departures, prospective landing spots for the A's include Montreal, Portland, Charlotte, Sacramento, or San Antonio.

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** In their early years, the Raiders were a very competitive team under late owner Al Davis, and Davis was known for being bold and controversial as a owner/general manager. However, towards the end of Davis' life, the team became something of a joke. Since 2002, the team had ''nine'' different head coaches, [[note]]Bill Callahan, Norv Turner, Art Shell, Lane Kiffin, Tom Cable, Hue Jackson, Dennis Allen, Tony Sparano, and Jack Del Rio[[/note]] and the team had not finished with a record better than 8-8 until 2016; however, in their first playoff appearance in over a decade, the Raiders were an early out due to injuries at the quarterback position. Prior to and since Al Davis' death, the Raiders have been trying to replace the antiquated Coliseum to no avail. Los Angeles is off the table for relocation, since the Rams won the right to return to LA in 2016, and the rival Chargers had a provision to join them within the following year and subsequently exercised that right since they failed get their own long obsolete stadium in San Diego replaced. After mulling a move to San Antonio, the Raiders received league approval to move to Las Vegas by 2020; however, Las Vegas' small media market and legal gambling industry, as noted above, are potential concerns. A move to Sacramento would have kept most of the Raiders' existing fanbase in Oakland within a two to three hour drive, and Sacramento is the second largest media market without an NFL franchise; however, Sacramento lacks a large corporate presence, since most of the city's economy, as the California state capital, is centered around the local, county, and state governments. On top of that, a new stadium would be needed; Sacramento's largest stadium[[note]]Hornet Stadium, home to the [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball FCS-level]] Sacramento State Hornets[[/note]] doesn't even hold 22,000. The Raiders plan to stay in Oakland as a lame duck team for at least 2017 and 2018 while the new Las Vegas stadium is under construction; however, considering that the late Bud Adams tried to do the same thing with the then-Houston Oilers before moving to Nashville two decades ago, history may is likely to repeat. If a sharp decline in attendance doesn't force the Raiders out of Oakland early, a spurned Oakland city council voiding the Raiders' lease at the Oakland Coliseum almost certainly will.
** While the Athletics have been fairly competitive in their time in Oakland, their Butt Monkey status lies primarily with the Coliseum, where they have played since moving to Oakland in 1968. Aside from the stadium's aforementioned issues, the stadium's baseball configuration has the largest amount of foul territory in the majors, even by the standards of 1960s[=/=]70s-era multipurpose "cookie cutter" stadiums, meaning that foul balls which would end up in the seats and out of play at another ballpark can, and often will, be caught for an out; also, this puts fans sitting in the lower bowl further away from the action. Many Athletics fans hate the Mount Davis grandstand, which was constructed in the mid-1990s to lure the Raiders back to Oakland; Mount Davis took away the picturesque view of the Oakland hills which served as the backdrop for Athletics' games. The Athletics have tried to move out of the Coliseum and into their own ballpark either in Santa Clara, San Jose or Fremont; however, the San Francisco Giants claim territorial rights on those cities and they refuse to cede any of them to the Athletics. If the A's can't secure a new ballpark in Oakland, even with the Raiders' and Warriors' imminent departures, prospective landing spots for the A's include Montreal, Portland, Charlotte, Sacramento, or San Antonio.



** The Rays started off as the Devil Rays playing for a penny-pinching owner who alienated the local business community and mismanaged the team. It didn't help that the team's attempts at jersey designs and colors looked like eyesores for the first eight years. It wasn't until they dropped the Devil from the name and got smarter ownership that the team turned it around in 2008 to become the model mid-market franchise (small payroll but big results) of the last six years. Problem is, they still play in one of the least-liked indoor stadiums left in pro baseball in a part of the Tampa Bay market (downtown St. Pete) that can be almost impossible to drive to for most game days.

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** The Rays started off as the Devil Rays playing for a penny-pinching owner who alienated the local business community and mismanaged the team. It didn't help that the team's attempts at jersey designs and colors looked like eyesores for the first eight years. It wasn't until they dropped the Devil "Devil" from the name and got smarter ownership that the team turned it around in 2008 to become the model mid-market franchise (small payroll but big results) of the last six years. Problem is, they still play in one of the least-liked indoor stadiums left in pro baseball in a part of the Tampa Bay market (downtown St. Pete) that can be almost impossible to drive to for most game days.



** Their MLS team, the Mutiny, was the first team to be the best of the regular season. Yet they lasted only five years. (The current soccer team, the Tampa Bay Rowdies of the NASL (now of the USL), won the league in 2012 but has struggled ever since)

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** Their MLS team, the Mutiny, was the first team to be the best of the regular season. Yet they lasted only five years. (The current soccer team, the Tampa Bay Rowdies of the NASL (now of the USL), won the league in 2012 but has struggled ever since)since.)



** The Vancouver Grizzlies had a mercifully short existence in the NBA, in which they won the first two games in franchise history and it was all downhill from there, with two losing streaks in their first season and no season in which they came close to a winning record or any hope for the playoffs. In fact, in the NBA's first lockout season, the team ended up getting only ''8 wins'' in that season.[[note]]Thankfully for them, ''that'' lockout had only 50 games as opposed to the more recent 66-game lockout season. That meant they didn't grab the worst record in NBA history.[[/note]]. To add insult to injury, a few years after the team moved to Memphis, they became a perennial playoff team.

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** The Vancouver Grizzlies had a mercifully short existence in the NBA, in which they won the first two games in franchise history and it was all downhill from there, with two losing streaks in their first season and no season in which they came close to a winning record or any hope for the playoffs. In fact, in the NBA's first lockout season, the team ended up getting only ''8 wins'' in that season.[[note]]Thankfully for them, ''that'' lockout had only 50 games as opposed to the more recent 66-game lockout season. That meant they didn't grab the worst record winning percentage in NBA history.[[/note]]. To add insult to injury, a few years after the team moved to Memphis, they became a perennial playoff team.



* The current Winnipeg Jets are the runt of not only the NHL, but among ''all'' of the teams in the five major North American professional leagues. With less than three-quarter of a million residents in its metro area, the team plays in the smallest standalone media market among professional sports in North America[[note]]Even though Green Bay is the ''absolute'' smallest pro sports market in North America, the Packers also claim the larger Milwaukee media market, and the state of Wisconsin is more populous than the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan combined[[/note]]. The team plays in the league's smallest arena, the MTS Centre, which seats only 15,000; even though it's considered a large, modern arena, it is undersized by NHL standards, meaning the Jets end up finishing in the bottom third in the league and dead last among Canadian teams for attendance despite having sell outs for all of their home games. Many top-tier free agents have Winnipeg on or near the top of their "no-move" lists because of the city's perception of being located out in the middle of nowhere and having nothing to do in the off-season. True North Sports and Entertainment originally sought to bring the ''original'' Winnipeg Jets, the Arizona Coyotes, home; however, the NHL instead persuaded True North to buy a bargain basement team in the [[ReplacementGoldfish former Atlanta Thrashers]], a team practically ran into the ground by its ex-owners (See Atlanta's section in "Cities in General" for more details). Aside from dysfunctional ownership in Atlanta, the only reason the NHL even considered returning to Winnipeg was [[MoneyDearBoy a then-strong Canadian dollar]]; if the Canadian dollar ever falls too far below its US counterpart as it did in the early '90s, which led to the original Jets moving to Arizona, the Jets are most likely the first Canadian team to be put up for relocation or contraction. The team had to spend their first two seasons in the Thrashers' place in the now-defunct Southeast Division, putting the team at a competitive and geographical disadvantage since their nearest divisional opponent was more than ''1500 miles'' away. And their attempt at getting the final seed of the East in 2013 still fell short! Realignment for 2013-14 hasn't helped much, as the Jets finished dead last in the reorganized Central Division. The Jets did make the playoffs in 2015 as the second wild card in the Western Conference, only to get swept in the first round by the Anaheim Ducks. Unlike the NFL's Cleveland Browns, MLS' San Jose Earthquakes, and the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, the Jets have not reclaimed the original franchise's history; [[ContinuitySnarl it's still tied to the Arizona Coyotes' history]][[note]]Despite the NHL owning the Coyotes in 2011, the league chose ''not'' to allow True North to claim the original Jets' history, only giving them rights to the team name and former logos[[/note]].

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* The current Winnipeg Jets are the runt of not only the NHL, but among ''all'' of the teams in the five major North American professional leagues. With less than three-quarter of a million residents in its metro area, the team plays in the smallest standalone media market among professional sports in North America[[note]]Even though Green Bay is the ''absolute'' smallest pro sports market in North America, the Packers also claim the larger Milwaukee media market, and the state of Wisconsin is more populous than the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan combined[[/note]]. The team plays in the league's smallest arena, the MTS Centre, which seats only 15,000; even though it's considered a large, modern arena, it is undersized by NHL standards, meaning the Jets end up finishing in the bottom third in the league and dead last among Canadian teams for attendance despite having sell outs for all of their home games. Many top-tier free agents have Winnipeg on or near the top of their "no-move" lists because of the city's perception of being located out in the middle of nowhere and having nothing to do in the off-season. True North Sports and Entertainment originally sought to bring the ''original'' Winnipeg Jets, the Arizona Coyotes, home; however, the NHL instead persuaded True North to buy a bargain basement team in the [[ReplacementGoldfish former Atlanta Thrashers]], a team practically ran into the ground by its ex-owners (See Atlanta's section in "Cities in General" for more details). Aside from dysfunctional ownership in Atlanta, the only reason the NHL even considered returning to Winnipeg was [[MoneyDearBoy a then-strong Canadian dollar]]; if the Canadian dollar ever falls too far below its US counterpart as it did in the early '90s, which led to the original Jets moving to Arizona, the Jets are most likely the first Canadian team to be put up for relocation or contraction. The team had to spend their first two seasons in the Thrashers' place in the now-defunct Southeast Division, putting the team at a competitive and geographical disadvantage since their nearest divisional opponent was more than ''1500 miles'' away. And their attempt at getting the final seed of the East in 2013 still fell short! Realignment for 2013-14 hasn't helped much, as the Jets finished dead last in the reorganized Central Division. The Jets did make the playoffs in 2015 as the second wild card in the Western Conference, only to get swept in the first round by the Anaheim Ducks. Unlike the NFL's Cleveland Browns, MLS' MLS's San Jose Earthquakes, and the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, the Jets have not reclaimed the original franchise's history; [[ContinuitySnarl it's still tied to the Arizona Coyotes' history]][[note]]Despite the NHL owning the Coyotes in 2011, the league chose ''not'' to allow True North to claim the original Jets' history, only giving them rights to the team name and former logos[[/note]].



* Along with the Oilers, the three other teams which descended from the World Hockey Association, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the original Winnipeg Jets, were Butt Monkeys deliberately invoked by the NHL as punishment for forcing the NHL to overexpand in the 1970s. Unlike the American Basketball Association, where all four of its surviving teams (Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, New York[=/=]New Jersey[=/=]Brooklyn Nets, and San Antonio Spurs) remain in their respective post-merger markets to this day, only one WHA team, the Edmonton Oilers, is still in its post-merger market as of 2016. As part of the agreement to join the NHL, the four WHA teams' rosters were stripped of their players, save for a few protected players, the teams received no compensation for players reclaimed by the existing NHL teams and the teams were placed in the bottom of the order in the 1979 rookie draft, instead of at the top as is the standard practice for expansion teams. The four teams were among the smallest markets for any professional team, severely limiting their profit potential. By the 1990s, the four former WHA clubs were also playing in small, outdated arenas. An anemic Canadian dollar in the early 1990s forced the Nordiques and Jets down to Denver (as the Avalanche) and Phoenix (as the Coyotes), respectively, and the Oilers almost moved to Houston (not long after Bud Adams moved the NFL's Oilers to Tennessee); however, an Edmonton-based consortium outbid Rockets' owner Leslie Alexander to keep the team in Alberta. The Whalers fared no better as they were essentially strong-armed by the old guard New York Rangers and Boston Bruins, ultimately moving to Raleigh, North Carolina (as the Hurricanes). Since then, the NHL returned to Winnipeg with the above-mentioned move of the Atlanta Thrashers, and Quebec City has built a new [=NHL-caliber=] arena, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_Vidéotron Centre Videotron]], with hopes of reviving the Nordiques, by landing either a potential expansion team or, like Winnipeg, a relocated team.

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* Along with the Oilers, the three other teams which descended from the World Hockey Association, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the original Winnipeg Jets, were Butt Monkeys deliberately invoked by the NHL as punishment for forcing the NHL to overexpand in the 1970s. Unlike the American Basketball Association, where all four of its surviving teams (Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, New York[=/=]New Jersey[=/=]Brooklyn Nets, and San Antonio Spurs) remain in their respective post-merger markets to this day, only one WHA team, the Edmonton Oilers, is still in its post-merger market as of 2016. As part of the agreement to join the NHL, the four WHA teams' rosters were stripped of their players, save for a few protected players, the teams received no compensation for players reclaimed by the existing NHL teams and the teams were placed in the bottom of the order in the 1979 rookie draft, instead of at the top as is the standard practice for expansion teams. The four teams were among the smallest markets for any professional team, severely limiting their profit potential. By the 1990s, the four former WHA clubs were also playing in small, outdated arenas. An anemic Canadian dollar in the early 1990s forced the Nordiques and Jets down to Denver (as the Avalanche) and Phoenix (as the Coyotes), respectively, and the Oilers almost moved to Houston (not not long after Bud Adams moved the NFL's Oilers to Tennessee); Tennessee; however, an Edmonton-based consortium outbid Rockets' owner Leslie Alexander to keep the team in Alberta. The Whalers fared no better as they were essentially strong-armed by the old guard New York Rangers and Boston Bruins, ultimately moving to Raleigh, North Carolina (as the Hurricanes). Since then, the NHL returned to Winnipeg with the above-mentioned move of the Atlanta Thrashers, and Quebec City has built a new [=NHL-caliber=] arena, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_Vidéotron Centre Videotron]], with hopes of reviving the Nordiques, by landing either a potential expansion team or, like Winnipeg, a relocated team.
6th May '17 3:28:29 PM PkmnFightr
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*** Russia: In Moscow, Torpedo Moscow have not attained the successes of the capital city's "Big 4": Spartak Moscow, CSKA Moscow, Lokomotiv Moscow, and Dynamo Moscow. Ironically, Lokomotiv were once this until they TookALevelInBadass after the USSR's dissolution.
*** Argentina: In Buenos Aires, all clubs that are not named Boca Juniors or River Plate (Some examples include Velez Sarsfield and San Lorenzo).
2nd May '17 10:56:24 PM Gsueagle31049
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* UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}. ''Where do we begin?'' Historically, most Southerners have supported college teams better than professional teams, since major league sports is still relatively new for much the DeepSouth[[note]]From 1966 to 1988, discounting the 5-year existence of the New Orleans Jazz in the NBA in the 1970s, Atlanta was the only major city in the Deep South with a team in major professional leagues besides the NFL[[/note]]. However, because of the city's notorious traffic issues, the transient status of many of the metro area's residents, and long stretches of futility by its professional teams (with only ''one'' championship in nearly 150 seasons of play in the NFL, MLB and NBA), many sportswriters, usually those based up North, often brand Atlanta as "[[http://espn.go.com/new-york/nfl/story/_/id/7429623/the-city-atlanta-worst-sports-town-america the worst pro sports town in America]]". Many Atlantans often attempt to refute this claim by stating that the poor ownership of its professional teams is the reason for the city's reputation as a bad sports town[[note]]And in some cases, this is true, especially with the debacles of Atlanta Spirit, ex-owners of the NBA's Hawks and the defunct Thrashers of the NHL[[/note]].
** The Falcons have been, for most of their existence, a mediocre team at best to a bad team at worst. It took the team over ''4 decades'' to attain their first consecutive winning seasons. However, under Arthur Blank's ownership, the Falcons' fortunes started to improve. From 2008 to 2012, under general manager Thomas Dimitroff, head coach Mike Smith and quarterback Matt Ryan, the Falcons were one of the NFL's more solid teams; however, they suffered from a bad case of EveryYearTheyFizzleOut, going 1-4 in the playoffs in that period. Since their 2012 NFC Championship loss, the Falcons have seemingly entered another DorkAge. 2014 was an off year for the ''entire'' NFC South with all four teams finishing the season with a losing record and many sportwriters labeled the 2014 NFC South as "the worst division in pro football", but the Falcons followed up with an inexplicably bad 2015, going 8-8 for the year after starting 5-0. In 2016, quarterback Matt Ryan was named the league's MVP and the Falcons made their first Super Bowl appearance in nearly two decades; however, [[NeverLiveItDown they end up blowing a 25 point lead]] to put the Super Bowl in overtime for the first time ever, where they ultimately fell to the [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter New England Patriots]].

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* UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}}. ''Where do we begin?'' Historically, most Southerners have supported college teams better than professional teams, since major league sports is still relatively new for much the DeepSouth[[note]]From 1966 to 1988, discounting the 5-year existence of the New Orleans Jazz in the NBA in the 1970s, Atlanta was the only major city in the Deep South with a team in major professional leagues besides the NFL[[/note]]. However, because of the city's notorious traffic issues, the transient status of many of the metro area's residents, and long stretches of futility by its professional teams (with only ''one'' championship in seven tries[[note]]five World Series for the Braves, two Super Bowls for the Falcons, and the Hawks yet to reach the NBA Finals in their nearly 50 years in Atlanta[[/note]] in nearly 150 seasons of play in the NFL, MLB and NBA), many sportswriters, usually those based up North, often brand Atlanta as "[[http://espn.go.com/new-york/nfl/story/_/id/7429623/the-city-atlanta-worst-sports-town-america the worst pro sports town in America]]". Many Atlantans often attempt to refute this claim by stating that the poor ownership of its professional teams is the reason for the city's reputation as a bad sports town[[note]]And in some cases, this is true, especially with the debacles of Atlanta Spirit, ex-owners of the NBA's Hawks and the defunct Thrashers of the NHL[[/note]].
town.
** The Falcons have been, for most of their existence, a mediocre team at best to a bad team at worst. It took the team over ''4 decades'' to attain their first consecutive winning seasons. However, under Arthur Blank's ownership, the Falcons' fortunes started to improve. From 2008 to 2012, under general manager Thomas Dimitroff, head coach Mike Smith and quarterback Matt Ryan, the Falcons were one of the NFL's more solid teams; however, they suffered from a bad case of EveryYearTheyFizzleOut, going 1-4 in the playoffs in that period. Since their 2012 NFC Championship loss, the Falcons have seemingly entered another DorkAge. 2014 was an off year for the ''entire'' NFC South with all four teams finishing the season with a losing record and many sportwriters labeled the 2014 NFC South as "the worst division in pro football", but the Falcons followed up with an inexplicably bad 2015, going 8-8 for the year after starting 5-0. In 2016, quarterback Matt Ryan was named the league's MVP and the Falcons made their first Super Bowl appearance in nearly two decades; however, [[NeverLiveItDown they end up blowing a a]] ''[[NeverLiveItDown 25 point lead]] lead]]'' to put the Super Bowl in overtime for the first time ever, where they ultimately fell to the [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter New England Patriots]].
2nd May '17 8:07:12 AM theenglishman
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* UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}}. The Maple Leafs kept out of the playoffs for 7 seasons after the 2004 NHL lockout (and have the longest current Stanley Cup drought of any team), the Blue Jays are [[SoOkayItsAverage forever 81-81]] and [[AlwaysABiggerFish dwarfed by the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees]] in the AL East (they had no playoff appearances between the World Series titles in 1992-3 and an AL East title in 2015), and as for the Toronto Raptors, before a surprisingly deep run all the way to the 2016 Conference Finals, had long stretches of being TheChewToy along with a meager 7 postseasons in 20 years (with just one round won in that period!). Add Toronto FC taking 9 seasons to qualify for the MLS playoffs (it was the only team, not counting the expansion ones that joined that season, not to hit the postseason; up until then it had won the Canadian Championship, which is only contested by 3 to 5 participants; and said first playoff ended in a [[CurbStompBattle 0-3 beating]]; they did get to the MLS Cup in 2016, only to lose in the penalty shootouts to Seattle), and only the UsefulNotes/CanadianFootballLeague has seen Toronto winning something in the last 20 years. However, the Argonauts suffer from the worst attendance in the CFL in recent years; not even a move from the cavernous Rogers Centre to the smaller BMO Field is helping.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}}. The Maple Leafs kept were out of the playoffs for 7 seasons after the 2004 NHL lockout (and have the longest current Stanley Cup drought of any team), the Blue Jays are [[SoOkayItsAverage forever 81-81]] and [[AlwaysABiggerFish dwarfed by the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees]] in the AL East (they had no playoff appearances between the World Series titles in 1992-3 and an AL East title titles in 2015), 2015 and 16), and as for the Toronto Raptors, before a surprisingly deep run all the way to the 2016 Conference Finals, had long stretches of being TheChewToy along with a meager 7 postseasons in 20 years (with just one round won in that period!). Add Toronto FC taking 9 seasons to qualify for the MLS playoffs (it was the only team, not counting the expansion ones that joined that season, not to hit the postseason; up until then it had won the Canadian Championship, which is only contested by 3 to 5 participants; and said first playoff ended in a [[CurbStompBattle 0-3 beating]]; they did get to the MLS Cup in 2016, only to lose in the penalty shootouts to Seattle), and only the UsefulNotes/CanadianFootballLeague has seen Toronto winning something in the last 20 years. However, the Argonauts suffer from the worst attendance in the CFL in recent years; not even a move from the cavernous Rogers Centre to the smaller BMO Field is helping.


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* The Toronto Maple Leafs have the unusual distinction of being considered both a ButtMonkey ''and'' an EvilEmpire; they are by far the largest of the Canadian markets, and spend the most money, but continue to play with ineptitude that earns them equal amounts of derision and pity. With that being said, recent changes in team philosophy and management, and especially their failed playoff run in 2017, have changed NHL fans' relationship with the Leafs from a team they LoveToHate to general pity, particularly as teams like Vancouver became easier targets for scorn.
30th Apr '17 1:27:14 PM Yalsaris63
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*** Two of the main reasons why the Warriors suffered a lot between 1975 and 2015 were their [[GlassCannon terrible defense]] and relative lack of reliable big-men. Even during their best years (Run TMC, We Believe), the Dubs' offense built large leads in many games...only for the Warriors' crappy defenses to squander the lead and gift the Dubs either a VERY slim victory or a heartbreaking loss. Some may argue that the Dubs' frequently used strategies that involved a [[FragileSpeedster LOT of scoring and fast break plays led to the lack of defense]] (and, subsequently, the lack of concrete success). The real constant of the problems the early iterations of the Dubs had suffered during their attempts for championship contention was their head coach Don Nelson. He popularized the "Nellie Ball" strategy (named after his nickname), which prioritized fast break offense over defense, which, while effective in the short run, does not generally guarantee success in the playoff level and is usually relegated to high school competition; thus the 80s and 90s Dubs constantly fizzled out during either the playoffs or the regular seasons because of this rather short-sighted strategy they implemented. Likewise, Golden State, for the most part, didn't have a great center/big-man since the departure of Nate Thurmond; it wouldn't surprise Dubs fans to see guys like Alton Lister (Made famous for getting dunked on and taunted by Shawn Kemp), Erick Dampier, Adonal Foyle, and Andris Biedrins man the middle. Even 6'9" Billy Owens, a natural small forward, saw some time at center for the Dubs! Thankfully, the Lacob/Splash Brothers-era renaissance seems to have taken care of some of these problems. For example, Coach Mark Jackson helped foster a culture of tough, effective defense with the Warriors (said defensive efficiency was retained by his successor, Steve Kerr). Likewise, the Dubs acquired noted defensive big Andrew Bogut and drafted center Festus Ezeli in 2012; while the two aren't exactly on par with, say, Anthony Davis or Marc Gasol, their defense and strength in the paint has been enough to ensure that the Warriors weren't easily pushed around beneath the basket. The Dubs' defensive renaissance has also been helped by the acquisition and development of great defenders, such as Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala. It helps to note that the 2015 Championship wasn't won solely by the Dubs' scintillating offense; their excellent defense, a far cry from the crap defenses of the Don Nelson/Small Ball era, was their key to winning the title. [[note]] [[LightningBruiser While the Dubs were ranked 2nd in the NBA with regards to Offensive efficiency, they ranked 1ST in DEFENSIVE EFFICIENCY! And they were also the fastest-paced team in the NBA!]] [[/note]]

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*** Two of the main reasons why the Warriors suffered a lot between 1975 and 2015 were their [[GlassCannon terrible defense]] and relative lack of reliable big-men. Even during their best years (Run TMC, We Believe), the Dubs' offense built large leads in many games...only for the Warriors' crappy defenses to squander the lead and gift the Dubs either a VERY slim victory or a heartbreaking loss. Some may argue that the Dubs' frequently used strategies that involved a [[FragileSpeedster LOT of scoring and fast break plays led to the lack of defense]] (and, subsequently, the lack of concrete success). The real constant of the problems the early iterations of the Dubs had suffered during their attempts for championship contention was their head coach Don Nelson. He popularized the "Nellie Ball" strategy (named after his nickname), which prioritized fast break offense over defense, which, while effective in the short run, does not generally guarantee success in the playoff level and is usually relegated to high school competition; thus the 80s and 90s Dubs constantly fizzled out during either the playoffs or the regular seasons because of this rather short-sighted strategy they implemented. Likewise, Golden State, for the most part, didn't have a great center/big-man since the departure of Nate Thurmond; it wouldn't surprise Dubs fans to see guys like Alton Lister (Made famous for getting dunked on and taunted by Shawn Kemp), Erick Dampier, Adonal Foyle, and Andris Biedrins man the middle. Even 6'9" Billy Owens, a natural small forward, saw some time at center for the Dubs! Thankfully, the Lacob/Splash Brothers-era renaissance seems to have taken care of some of these problems. For example, Coach Mark Jackson helped foster a culture of tough, effective defense with the Warriors (said defensive efficiency was retained by his successor, Steve Kerr). Likewise, the Dubs acquired noted defensive big Andrew Bogut and drafted center Festus Ezeli in 2012; while the two aren't exactly on par with, say, Anthony Davis or Marc Gasol, their defense and strength in the paint has been enough to ensure that the Warriors weren't easily pushed around beneath the basket. The Dubs' defensive renaissance has also been helped by the acquisition and development of great defenders, such as Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala. It helps to note that the 2015 Championship wasn't won solely by the Dubs' scintillating offense; their excellent defense, a far cry from the crap defenses of the Don Nelson/Small Ball era, was their key to winning the title. [[note]] [[LightningBruiser While the Dubs were ranked 2nd in the NBA with regards to Offensive efficiency, they ranked 1ST in DEFENSIVE EFFICIENCY! And they were also the fastest-paced team in the NBA!]] [[/note]]
30th Apr '17 1:24:18 PM Yalsaris63
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*** Two of the main reasons why the Warriors suffered a lot between 1975 and 2015 were their [[GlassCannon terrible defense]] and relative lack of reliable big-men. Even during their best years (Run TMC, We Believe), the Dubs' offense built large leads in many games...only for the Warriors' crappy defenses to squander the lead and gift the Dubs either a VERY slim victory or a heartbreaking loss. Some may argue that the Dubs' frequently used strategies that involved a [[FragileSpeedster LOT of scoring and fast break plays led to the lack of defense]] (and, subsequently, the lack of concrete success). The real constant of the problems the early iterations of the Dubs had suffered during their attempts for championship contention was their head coach Don Nelson. He popularized the "Nellie Ball" strategy (named after his nickname), which prioritized fast break offense over defense, which, while effective in the short run, does not generally guarantee success in the playoff level; thus the 80s and 90s Dubs constantly fizzled out during either the playoffs or the regular seasons because of this rather short-sighted strategy they implemented. Likewise, Golden State, for the most part, didn't have a great center/big-man since the departure of Nate Thurmond; it wouldn't surprise Dubs fans to see guys like Alton Lister (Made famous for getting dunked on and taunted by Shawn Kemp), Erick Dampier, Adonal Foyle, and Andris Biedrins man the middle. Even 6'9" Billy Owens, a natural small forward, saw some time at center for the Dubs! Thankfully, the Lacob/Splash Brothers-era renaissance seems to have taken care of some of these problems. For example, Coach Mark Jackson helped foster a culture of tough, effective defense with the Warriors (said defensive efficiency was retained by his successor, Steve Kerr). Likewise, the Dubs acquired noted defensive big Andrew Bogut and drafted center Festus Ezeli in 2012; while the two aren't exactly on par with, say, Anthony Davis or Marc Gasol, their defense and strength in the paint has been enough to ensure that the Warriors weren't easily pushed around beneath the basket. The Dubs' defensive renaissance has also been helped by the acquisition and development of great defenders, such as Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala. It helps to note that the 2015 Championship wasn't won solely by the Dubs' scintillating offense; their excellent defense, a far cry from the crap defenses of the Don Nelson/Small Ball era, was their key to winning the title. [[note]] [[LightningBruiser While the Dubs were ranked 2nd in the NBA with regards to Offensive efficiency, they ranked 1ST in DEFENSIVE EFFICIENCY! And they were also the fastest-paced team in the NBA!]] [[/note]]

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*** Two of the main reasons why the Warriors suffered a lot between 1975 and 2015 were their [[GlassCannon terrible defense]] and relative lack of reliable big-men. Even during their best years (Run TMC, We Believe), the Dubs' offense built large leads in many games...only for the Warriors' crappy defenses to squander the lead and gift the Dubs either a VERY slim victory or a heartbreaking loss. Some may argue that the Dubs' frequently used strategies that involved a [[FragileSpeedster LOT of scoring and fast break plays led to the lack of defense]] (and, subsequently, the lack of concrete success). The real constant of the problems the early iterations of the Dubs had suffered during their attempts for championship contention was their head coach Don Nelson. He popularized the "Nellie Ball" strategy (named after his nickname), which prioritized fast break offense over defense, which, while effective in the short run, does not generally guarantee success in the playoff level; level and is usually relegated to high school competition; thus the 80s and 90s Dubs constantly fizzled out during either the playoffs or the regular seasons because of this rather short-sighted strategy they implemented. Likewise, Golden State, for the most part, didn't have a great center/big-man since the departure of Nate Thurmond; it wouldn't surprise Dubs fans to see guys like Alton Lister (Made famous for getting dunked on and taunted by Shawn Kemp), Erick Dampier, Adonal Foyle, and Andris Biedrins man the middle. Even 6'9" Billy Owens, a natural small forward, saw some time at center for the Dubs! Thankfully, the Lacob/Splash Brothers-era renaissance seems to have taken care of some of these problems. For example, Coach Mark Jackson helped foster a culture of tough, effective defense with the Warriors (said defensive efficiency was retained by his successor, Steve Kerr). Likewise, the Dubs acquired noted defensive big Andrew Bogut and drafted center Festus Ezeli in 2012; while the two aren't exactly on par with, say, Anthony Davis or Marc Gasol, their defense and strength in the paint has been enough to ensure that the Warriors weren't easily pushed around beneath the basket. The Dubs' defensive renaissance has also been helped by the acquisition and development of great defenders, such as Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala. It helps to note that the 2015 Championship wasn't won solely by the Dubs' scintillating offense; their excellent defense, a far cry from the crap defenses of the Don Nelson/Small Ball era, was their key to winning the title. [[note]] [[LightningBruiser While the Dubs were ranked 2nd in the NBA with regards to Offensive efficiency, they ranked 1ST in DEFENSIVE EFFICIENCY! And they were also the fastest-paced team in the NBA!]] [[/note]]
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