History ButtMonkey / Sports

3rd Dec '17 6:14:50 PM Gsueagle31049
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* Along with the Oilers, the three other teams which descended from the World Hockey Association, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the original Winnipeg Jets, were Butt Monkeys deliberately invoked by the NHL as punishment for forcing the NHL to overexpand in the 1970s. Unlike the American Basketball Association, where all four of its surviving teams (Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, New York[=/=]New Jersey[=/=]Brooklyn Nets, and San Antonio Spurs) remain in their respective post-merger markets to this day, only one WHA team, the Edmonton Oilers, is still in its post-merger market as of 2017. As part of the agreement to join the NHL, the four WHA teams' rosters were virtually gutted, the teams received no compensation for players reclaimed by the existing NHL teams and the teams were placed in the bottom of the order in the 1979 rookie draft, instead of at the top as is the standard practice for expansion teams. The four teams were among the smallest markets for any professional team, severely limiting their profit potential. By the 1990s, the four former WHA clubs were also playing in small, outdated arenas. An anemic Canadian dollar in the early 1990s forced the Nordiques and Jets down to Denver (as the Avalanche) and Phoenix (as the Coyotes), respectively, and the Oilers almost moved to Houston not long after Bud Adams moved the NFL's Oilers to Tennessee; however, an Edmonton-based consortium outbid Rockets' owner Leslie Alexander to keep the team in Alberta. The Whalers fared no better as they were essentially strong-armed by the old guard New York Rangers and Boston Bruins (and to some extent, the New York Islanders and New Jersey Devils as well), ultimately moving to Raleigh, North Carolina (as the Hurricanes). Since then, the NHL returned to Winnipeg with the above-mentioned move of the Atlanta Thrashers, and Quebec City has built a new [=NHL-caliber=] arena, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_Vidéotron Centre Videotron]], with hopes of reviving the Nordiques by either expansion or relocation.

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* Along with the Oilers, the three other teams which descended from the World Hockey Association, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the original Winnipeg Jets, were Butt Monkeys deliberately invoked by the NHL as punishment for forcing the NHL to overexpand in the 1970s. Unlike the American Basketball Association, where all four of its surviving teams (Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, New York[=/=]New Jersey[=/=]Brooklyn Nets, and San Antonio Spurs) remain in their respective post-merger markets to this day, only one WHA team, the Edmonton Oilers, is still in its post-merger market as of 2017. As part of the agreement to join the NHL, the four WHA teams' rosters were virtually gutted, the teams received no compensation for players reclaimed by the existing NHL teams and the teams were placed in the bottom of the order in the 1979 rookie draft, instead of at the top as is the standard practice for expansion teams. The four teams were among the smallest markets for any professional team, severely limiting their profit potential. By the 1990s, the four former WHA clubs were also playing in small, outdated arenas. An anemic Canadian dollar in the early 1990s forced the Nordiques and Jets down to Denver (as the Avalanche) in 1995 and Phoenix (as the Coyotes), Coyotes) in 1996, respectively, and the Oilers almost moved to Houston not long in 1998 (two years after Bud Adams moved the NFL's Oilers to Tennessee; Tennessee); however, an Edmonton-based consortium outbid Rockets' then-Rockets' owner Leslie Alexander to keep the team in Alberta. The Whalers fared no better as they were essentially strong-armed by the old guard New York Rangers and Boston Bruins (and to some lesser extent, the New York Islanders and New Jersey Devils as well), ultimately moving to Raleigh, North Carolina (as the Hurricanes).Hurricanes) in 1997. Since then, the NHL returned to Winnipeg with the above-mentioned move of the Atlanta Thrashers, and Quebec City has built a new [=NHL-caliber=] arena, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_Vidéotron Centre Videotron]], with hopes of reviving the Nordiques by either expansion or relocation.
24th Nov '17 11:07:20 AM nombretomado
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** Some of this stems from a general bias against the city of Jacksonville, Florida; while it's actually the largest city in {{Florida}}, it has a reputation of being a small town that thinks it's a metropolis (objectively, these critics are right that "largest city in Florida" is a bit overblown: it has the largest population because it is also the most geographically extensive major city in Florida--Miami, the Tampa Bay Area, and Orlando-Kissimmee have much larger urban populations, but they are divided into a large number of small municipalities). Ever since the team was awarded in 1995, there have been sports writers and fans questioning, "Why a team in Jacksonville?"

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** Some of this stems from a general bias against the city of Jacksonville, Florida; while it's actually the largest city in {{Florida}}, UsefulNotes/{{Florida}}, it has a reputation of being a small town that thinks it's a metropolis (objectively, these critics are right that "largest city in Florida" is a bit overblown: it has the largest population because it is also the most geographically extensive major city in Florida--Miami, the Tampa Bay Area, and Orlando-Kissimmee have much larger urban populations, but they are divided into a large number of small municipalities). Ever since the team was awarded in 1995, there have been sports writers and fans questioning, "Why a team in Jacksonville?"
22nd Nov '17 1:30:27 AM Laevatein
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* The Richmond Tigers are perpetually mocked for always finishing just under the top 8.

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* The Richmond Tigers are were perpetually mocked for always finishing just under the top 8.8... until they quite unexpectedly won the premiership in 2017.
21st Nov '17 12:30:52 PM KYCubbie
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** In the Bay Area, any Oakland team (Raiders and Athletics) to any San Francisco team (49ers and Giants). You can also say this about the sports teams of SF State, San Jose State, and Santa Clara U, which are relatively weak compared to the big athletic programs of Cal (UC Berkeley) and Stanford.

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** In the Bay Area, any Oakland team (Raiders and Athletics) to any San Francisco team (49ers and Giants). You can also say this about the sports teams of SF State, San Francisco, San Jose State, and Santa Clara U, and Saint Mary's, which are relatively weak compared to the big athletic programs of Cal (UC Berkeley) and Stanford.



*** In Florida, the Jaguars to the Dolphins and Buccaneers, the Magic to the Heat, the Rays to the Marlins, UCF compared to Miami and Florida, and the Panthers to the Lightning.
*** In Ohio, the Browns to the Bengals.

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*** In Florida, the Jaguars to the Dolphins and Buccaneers, the Magic to the Heat, the Rays to the Marlins, UCF and USF compared to Miami and Florida, and the Panthers to the Lightning.
Lightning. Drilling down to the Miami area, you have FIU and FAU to Miami in college sports.
*** In Ohio, the Browns to the Bengals.Bengals, and everyone else (most notably Cincinnati) to Ohio State.



*** Spain: In Barcelona, Espanyol to FC Barcelona. In Madrid, any team that is not Real Madrid or Atletico Madrid. In Valencia, Levante to Valencia. In Sevilla, Real Betis to Sevilla.
*** Brazil: In Sao Paulo, Santos is (surprisingly) this compared to Corinthians, Palmeiras, and Sao Paulo FC [[note]]Fans of the latter three teams view Santos as a "Widow" which couldn't succeed without their shining stars Pelé and Neymar [[/note]]. In Rio, Botafogo is this compared to Flamengo, Vasco da Gama, and Fluminense.
*** France: In Paris, any team not named Paris St. Germain.
*** Germany: In Munich, 1860 Munchen to Bayern Munchen. In Post-reunification Berlin, any team not named Hertha BSC (Used to be any team not named Dynamo Berlin during the DDR-Oberliga (East German) years). In Frankfurt, FSV to Eintracht Frankfurt. In Hamburg, St. Pauli to Hamburger SV.
*** Italy: In Turin, Torino aren't that bad, but they're still no Juventus. In Rome, Lazio's slightly less successful than Roma.

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*** Spain: In Barcelona, Espanyol to FC Barcelona. In Madrid, any team that is not Real Madrid or Atletico Atlético Madrid. In Valencia, Levante to Valencia. In Sevilla, Real Betis to Sevilla.
*** Brazil: In Sao São Paulo, Santos is (surprisingly) this compared to Corinthians, Palmeiras, and Sao São Paulo FC [[note]]Fans of the latter three teams view Santos as a "Widow" which couldn't succeed without their shining stars Pelé and Neymar [[/note]]. In Rio, Botafogo is this compared to Flamengo, Vasco da Gama, and Fluminense.
*** France: In Paris, any team not named Paris St. Germain. \n Or, for a long time, Racing 92 to Stade Français in rugby, though that's no longer the case.
*** Germany: In Munich, 1860 Munchen München to Bayern Munchen. München. In Post-reunification post-reunification Berlin, any team not named Hertha BSC (Used (used to be any team not named Dynamo Berlin during the DDR-Oberliga (East German) years). In Frankfurt, FSV to Eintracht Frankfurt. In Hamburg, St. Pauli to Hamburger SV.
*** Italy: In Turin, Torino aren't that bad, but they're still no Juventus. In Rome, Lazio's slightly less successful than Roma. In Verona, Chievo was this to Hellas for a long time, but not any more. In Bologna, Fortitudo to Virtus in basketball.



*** Turkey: In Istanbul, Besikitas lags behind Fenerbahce and Galatasaray.

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*** Turkey: In Istanbul, Besikitas Beşiktaş lags behind Fenerbahce Fenerbahçe and Galatasaray.



*** Argentina: In Buenos Aires, all clubs that are not named Boca Juniors or River Plate (Some examples include Velez Sarsfield and San Lorenzo).

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*** Argentina: In Buenos Aires, all clubs that are not named Boca Juniors or River Plate (Some (some examples include Velez Vélez Sarsfield and San Lorenzo).



** The Hawks have been equally inconsistent since their arrival in Atlanta in 1968 (prior to this, they were in St. Louis, where they won a championship in 1958[[note]]And since the franchise is waiting ever since, it's the second longest drought in the NBA, behind the Sacramento Kings franchise since 1951, when they were the Rochester Royals[[/note]]). The Hawks' first permanent arena in Atlanta, the Omni Coliseum, despite being innovative for its time, was literally a rust bucket. The arena was built with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weathering_steel weathering steel]] as part of its load bearing structure, with the steel intentionally forming a thin layer of rust to seal itself; however, the engineers who designed the arena failed to account for Altanta's humid climate, meaning the steel had rusted more than intended. The arena was also built on a former railroad yard, and unanticipated settling caused further stress to the structure. The Omni's rapid deterioration led to its subsequent demolition and replacement by Philips Arena in the late 1990s. The Hawks' most recent ex-owners, Atlanta Spirit, had been a circus, with the group getting involved in numerous external and internal lawsuits, selling off the NHL's Thrashers to opportunistic Canadians in 2011, and then-GM Danny Ferry and then-controlling owner Bruce Levenson were found to have made racist comments about Luol Deng, a Sudanese-born player, and the black majority fanbase in Atlanta, respectively in 2012 and 2014; the latter incident occurred not long after the NBA ousted ex-Clippers owner Donald Sterling for his three decades of racist behavior. The final season under Atlanta Spirit was ironically the team's best: they finished atop the Eastern Conference, and got to the Conference Finals for the first time ever. [[AntiClimax And then were swept by the Cavaliers.]] The next year, the Hawks again had a good season, won a playoff series, only for the Cavs to beat them 4-0 again, only one round earlier. (Add another sweep in 2009, and it seems Atlanta just can't handle [=LeBron=] James.) Then 2017 had the Hawks falling in round 1 to the same Washington Wizards they beat two years prior...

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** The Hawks have been equally inconsistent since their arrival in Atlanta in 1968 (prior to this, they were in St. Louis, where they won a championship in 1958[[note]]And since the franchise is waiting ever since, it's the second longest drought in the NBA, behind the Sacramento Kings franchise since 1951, when they were the Rochester Royals[[/note]]). The Hawks' first permanent arena in Atlanta, the Omni Coliseum, despite being innovative for its time, was literally a rust bucket. The arena was built with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weathering_steel weathering steel]] as part of its load bearing structure, with the steel intentionally forming a thin layer of rust to seal itself; however, the engineers who designed the arena failed to account for Altanta's humid climate, meaning the steel had rusted more than intended. The arena was also built on a former railroad yard, and unanticipated settling caused further stress to the structure. The Omni's rapid deterioration led to its subsequent demolition and replacement by Philips Arena in the late 1990s. The Hawks' most recent ex-owners, Atlanta Spirit, had been a circus, with the group getting involved in numerous external and [[WeAREStrugglingTogether internal lawsuits, lawsuits]], selling off the NHL's Thrashers to opportunistic Canadians in 2011, and then-GM Danny Ferry and then-controlling owner Bruce Levenson were respectively found to have made racist comments about Luol Deng, a Sudanese-born player, in 2012 and the black majority fanbase in Atlanta, respectively Atlanta in 2012 and 2014; the latter incident occurred not long after the NBA ousted ex-Clippers owner Donald Sterling for his three decades of racist behavior. The final season under Atlanta Spirit was ironically the team's best: they finished atop the Eastern Conference, and got to the Conference Finals for the first time ever. [[AntiClimax And then were swept by the Cavaliers.]] The next year, the Hawks again had a good season, won a playoff series, only for the Cavs to beat them 4-0 again, only one round earlier. (Add another sweep in 2009, and it seems Atlanta just can't handle [=LeBron=] James.UsefulNotes/LeBronJames.) Then 2017 had the Hawks falling in round 1 to the same Washington Wizards they beat two years prior...
7th Nov '17 7:29:15 PM megachao24
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** In 2015, both the city and Spurs Sports and Entertainment put in major investment for Toyota Field and starting up San Antonio FC in the second tier soccer league USL in order to lure a MLS team. After a false start in 2005, sports fans in city felt like [[HopeSpot San Antonio was FINALLY getting that long coveted second team]]. Come 2017, Columbus Crew SC owner Anthony Precourt comes out and threatens to move the team to nearby Austin if he does not get a downtown stadium in Central Ohio. [[InternetBackdraft The fury from fans in San Antonio almost rivaled that of those in Columbus]].
1st Nov '17 9:47:37 PM Yalsaris63
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* Other teams can perhaps claim of longer championship droughts, but the Texas Rangers remain the oldest MLB franchise (including the first 11 years operating and the second installment of the Washington Senators) to have NEVER won the World Series. Since 2002, they were the oldest franchise to never even make it to the Series - until they ended that in 2010. Despite being steamrolled in the 2010 Series to the Giants, they returned to the Fall Classic in 2011 - and proceeded to lose it in the ''most gut-wrenching way possible'', losing what would have been the final out of the Series on a missed fly ball that led to them losing Game Six and then Game Seven. To make matters worse, the team regularly gets little respect and support in its own region, as they play in the shadow of the Dallas Cowboys in the most football-crazy state in the country, so all interest in baseball in North Texas completely vanishes once football training camp starts regardless of where the Rangers stand. Even worse, the Houston Astros, another team ridiculed for their historically sub-par record in baseball, managed to end their 55-year championship drought by winning the 2017 World Series in seven games.

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* Other teams can perhaps claim of longer championship droughts, but the Texas Rangers remain the oldest MLB franchise (including the first 11 years operating and the second installment of the Washington Senators) to have NEVER won the World Series. Since 2002, they were the oldest franchise to never even make it to the Series - until they ended that in 2010. Despite being steamrolled in the 2010 Series to the Giants, they returned to the Fall Classic in 2011 - and proceeded to lose it in the ''most gut-wrenching way possible'', losing what would have been the final out of the Series on a missed fly ball that led to them losing Game Six and then Game Seven. To make matters worse, the team regularly gets little respect and support in its own region, as they play in the shadow of the Dallas Cowboys in the most football-crazy state in the country, so all interest in baseball in North Texas completely vanishes once football training camp starts regardless of where the Rangers stand. Even worse, the Houston Astros, another team ridiculed for their historically sub-par record in baseball, managed to end their 55-year championship drought by winning the 2017 World Series in seven games.games; the Astros are now the first team in Texas to take home a World Series title.
1st Nov '17 9:37:22 PM Yalsaris63
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* Other teams can perhaps claim of longer championship droughts, but the Texas Rangers remain the oldest MLB franchise (including the first 11 years operating and the second installment of the Washington Senators) to have NEVER won the World Series. Since 2002, they were the oldest franchise to never even make it to the Series - until they ended that in 2010. Despite being steamrolled in the 2010 Series to the Giants, they returned to the Fall Classic in 2011 - and proceeded to lose it in the ''most gut-wrenching way possible'', losing what would have been the final out of the Series on a missed fly ball that led to them losing Game Six and then Game Seven. To make matters worse, the team regularly gets little respect and support in its own region, as they play in the shadow of the Dallas Cowboys in the most football-crazy state in the country, so all interest in baseball in North Texas completely vanishes once football training camp starts regardless of where the Rangers stand. Even worse, the Houston Astros, another team ridiculed for their sub-par record in baseball, managed to end their 55-year championship drought by winning the 2017 World Series in seven games.

to:

* Other teams can perhaps claim of longer championship droughts, but the Texas Rangers remain the oldest MLB franchise (including the first 11 years operating and the second installment of the Washington Senators) to have NEVER won the World Series. Since 2002, they were the oldest franchise to never even make it to the Series - until they ended that in 2010. Despite being steamrolled in the 2010 Series to the Giants, they returned to the Fall Classic in 2011 - and proceeded to lose it in the ''most gut-wrenching way possible'', losing what would have been the final out of the Series on a missed fly ball that led to them losing Game Six and then Game Seven. To make matters worse, the team regularly gets little respect and support in its own region, as they play in the shadow of the Dallas Cowboys in the most football-crazy state in the country, so all interest in baseball in North Texas completely vanishes once football training camp starts regardless of where the Rangers stand. Even worse, the Houston Astros, another team ridiculed for their historically sub-par record in baseball, managed to end their 55-year championship drought by winning the 2017 World Series in seven games.
1st Nov '17 9:36:52 PM Yalsaris63
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* Other teams can perhaps claim of longer championship droughts, but the Texas Rangers remain the oldest MLB franchise (including the first 11 years operating and the second installment of the Washington Senators) to have NEVER won the World Series. Since 2002, they were the oldest franchise to never even make it to the Series - until they ended that in 2010. Despite being steamrolled in the 2010 Series to the Giants, they returned to the Fall Classic in 2011 - and proceeded to lose it in the ''most gut-wrenching way possible'', losing what would have been the final out of the Series on a missed fly ball that led to them losing Game Six and then Game Seven. To make matters worse, the team regularly gets little respect and support in its own region, as they play in the shadow of the Dallas Cowboys in the most football-crazy state in the country, so all interest in baseball in North Texas completely vanishes once football training camp starts regardless of where the Rangers stand.

to:

* Other teams can perhaps claim of longer championship droughts, but the Texas Rangers remain the oldest MLB franchise (including the first 11 years operating and the second installment of the Washington Senators) to have NEVER won the World Series. Since 2002, they were the oldest franchise to never even make it to the Series - until they ended that in 2010. Despite being steamrolled in the 2010 Series to the Giants, they returned to the Fall Classic in 2011 - and proceeded to lose it in the ''most gut-wrenching way possible'', losing what would have been the final out of the Series on a missed fly ball that led to them losing Game Six and then Game Seven. To make matters worse, the team regularly gets little respect and support in its own region, as they play in the shadow of the Dallas Cowboys in the most football-crazy state in the country, so all interest in baseball in North Texas completely vanishes once football training camp starts regardless of where the Rangers stand. Even worse, the Houston Astros, another team ridiculed for their sub-par record in baseball, managed to end their 55-year championship drought by winning the 2017 World Series in seven games.
24th Oct '17 11:31:40 AM Gsueagle31049
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* The current Winnipeg Jets are the runt of not only the NHL, but among ''all'' of the teams in the five major North American professional leagues. With less than a million residents in its metro area, the team plays in the smallest standalone media market among professional sports in North America[[note]]Even though Green Bay is the ''absolute'' smallest pro sports market in North America, the Packers also claim the larger Milwaukee media market, and the state of Wisconsin is more than twice as populous than the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan ''combined''[[/note]]. The team plays in the league's smallest arena, Bell MTS Place, which seats only 15,000; even though it's considered a large, modern arena, it is undersized by NHL standards, meaning the Jets end up finishing near the bottom of the league and dead last among Canadian teams for attendance despite all their home games being sold out for the foreseeable future. Many top-tier free agents have Winnipeg on or near the top of their "no-move" lists because of the city's perception of being located out in the middle of nowhere and having nothing to do during the off-season. True North Sports and Entertainment originally sought to bring the ''original'' Winnipeg Jets, the Arizona Coyotes, home; however, the NHL instead persuaded True North to buy a bargain basement team in the [[ReplacementGoldfish former Atlanta Thrashers]], a team ran into the ground by its ex-owners (See Atlanta's section in "Cities in General" for more details). Aside from dysfunctional ownership in Atlanta, the only reason the NHL even considered returning to Winnipeg was [[MoneyDearBoy a then-strong loonie]]; if the Canadian dollar falls too far below its US counterpart as it did in the early '90s, the Jets would be most likely the first Canadian team to be put up for relocation or contraction. The team had to spend their first two seasons in the Thrashers' place in the now-defunct Southeast Division, putting the team at a competitive and geographical disadvantage since their nearest divisional opponent was more than ''1500 miles'' away. And their attempt at getting the final seed of the East in 2013 still fell short! Realignment for 2013-14 hasn't helped much, as the Jets finished dead last in the reorganized Central Division. The Jets did make the playoffs in 2015 as the second wild card in the Western Conference, only to get swept in the first round by the Anaheim Ducks. Unlike the NFL's Cleveland Browns, MLS's San Jose Earthquakes, and the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, the Jets have not reclaimed the original franchise's history; [[ContinuitySnarl it's still tied to the Arizona Coyotes' history]][[note]]Despite the NHL owning the Coyotes in 2011, the league chose not to allow True North to reclaim the original Jets' history and retcon the Coyotes as a 1996 expansion team, only giving them rights to the intellectual property (i.e. the name and logos) of the original team[[/note]].

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* The current Winnipeg Jets are the runt of not only the NHL, but among ''all'' of the teams in the five major North American professional leagues. With less than a million residents in its metro area, the team plays in the smallest standalone media market among professional sports in North America[[note]]Even though Green Bay is the ''absolute'' smallest pro sports market in North America, the Packers also claim the larger Milwaukee media market, and the state of Wisconsin is more than twice as populous than the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan ''combined''[[/note]]. The team plays in the league's smallest arena, Bell MTS Place, which seats only 15,000; even though it's considered a large, modern arena, it is undersized by NHL standards, meaning the Jets end up finishing near the bottom of the league and dead last among Canadian teams for attendance despite all their home games being sold out for the foreseeable future. Many top-tier free agents have Winnipeg on or near the top of their "no-move" lists because of the city's perception of being located out in the middle of nowhere and having nothing to do during the off-season. True North Sports and Entertainment originally sought to bring the ''original'' Winnipeg Jets, the Arizona Coyotes, home; however, the NHL instead persuaded True North to buy a bargain basement team in the [[ReplacementGoldfish former Atlanta Thrashers]], a team ran into the ground by its ex-owners (See Atlanta's section in "Cities in General" for more details). Aside from dysfunctional ownership in Atlanta, the only reason the NHL even considered returning to Winnipeg was [[MoneyDearBoy a then-strong loonie]]; if the Canadian dollar falls too far below its US counterpart as it did in the early '90s, the Jets would be most likely the first Canadian team to be put up for relocation or contraction. The team had to spend their first two seasons in the Thrashers' place in the now-defunct Southeast Division, putting the team at a competitive and geographical disadvantage since their nearest divisional opponent was more than ''1500 miles'' away. And their attempt at getting the final seed of the East in 2013 still fell short! Realignment for 2013-14 hasn't helped much, as the Jets finished dead last in the reorganized Central Division. The Jets did make the playoffs in 2015 as the second wild card in the Western Conference, only to get swept in the first round by the Anaheim Ducks. Unlike the NFL's Cleveland Browns, MLS's San Jose Earthquakes, and the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, the Jets have not reclaimed the original franchise's history; [[ContinuitySnarl it's still tied to the Arizona Coyotes' history]][[note]]Despite the NHL owning the Coyotes in 2011, the league chose not to allow True North to reclaim the original Jets' history and retcon the Coyotes as a 1996 expansion team, only giving them rights to the intellectual property (i.e. the name and logos) of the original team[[/note]].



** The Calgary Flames, who had broken a seven-year drought as they reached the final in 2004 (lost to the Tampa Bay Lightning), lost in Round 1 the following four seasons, and failed to qualify for another five, with the final nail in their coffin being team star Jarome Iginla leaving in 2013. Then a surprisingly improved campaign in 2014-15 managed to break the Flames' playoff drought, where they even won a round against the Vancouver Canucks before bowing to the Anaheim Ducks. With intraprovincial rival Edmonton opening the new Rogers Place in 2016, and Detroit set to replace Joe Louis Arena with Little Caesars Arena in 2017, the Saddledome is currently the oldest arena in the NHL outside of Madison Square Garden.

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** The Calgary Flames, who had broken a seven-year drought as they reached the final in 2004 (lost to the Tampa Bay Lightning), lost in Round 1 the following four seasons, and failed to qualify for another five, with the final nail in their coffin being team star Jarome Iginla leaving in 2013. Then a surprisingly improved campaign in 2014-15 managed to break the Flames' playoff drought, where they even won a round against the Vancouver Canucks before bowing to the Anaheim Ducks. With intraprovincial rival Edmonton opening replacing the new Northlands Coliseum with Rogers Place in 2016, and Detroit set to replace replacing the Joe Louis Arena with Little Caesars Arena in 2017, the Scotiabank Saddledome is currently the oldest arena in the NHL outside of Madison Square Garden.Garden, which underwent major renovations in the early 2010s.
20th Oct '17 8:56:17 PM Gsueagle31049
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** Many teams, primarily those based in warm-weather markets, are financially struggling; many hockey purists blame expansion and relocation into the Southern US for the league's financial hardships as well as diluting the talent pool (though the last one [[http://espn.go.com/nhl/story/_/id/14334574/nhl-talent-dilution-not-blame-drop-goal-scoring is not as true as it seems]]); one such purist, the statistician Nate Silver (a big hockey fan--he grew up in Michigan), even attempted to back this argument up [[http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why-cant-canada-win-the-stanley-cup/ with the power of math]]! However, many Southern hockey fans argue that a hockey team at any level can thrive in the South under the right ownership.
** As much as hockey purists ''love'' to blame the league's expansion into the Southern US for its struggles, the expansion of the late 1960s and 1970s was possibly worse than the 1990s expansion, as the league had expanded too quickly by more than tripling in size, first doubling from Original Six in 1967[[note]]Philadelphia Flyers, Pittsburgh Penguins, Minnesota North Stars (now Dallas Stars), St. Louis Blues, Oakland Seals (later Cleveland Barons), and Los Angeles Kings[[/note]] then adding 9 more teams[[note]]added Buffalo Sabres and Vancouver Canucks in 1970, added NY Islanders and Atlanta (now Calgary) Flames in 1972, added Kansas City Scouts (later Colorado Rockies, now New Jersey Devils) and Washington Capitals in 1974, contracted the Cleveland Barons in 1978, and added Quebec Nordiques (now Colorado Avalanche), Hartford Whalers (now Carolina Hurricanes), the original Winnipeg Jets (now Arizona Coyotes), and Edmonton Oilers in the WHA merger in 1979[[/note]] in just 13 years. Many of those expansion teams struggled both on and off the ice early on with the Oakland Seals[=/=]Cleveland Barons franchise becoming one of the few major professional teams to fold since 1960.
** The league has seven Canadian teams. Canadian teams in predominately US-based leagues[[note]]Despite the NHL being formed in Montreal, its modern day headquarters is in New York City[[/note]] tend to be Butt Monkeys, and four of those teams, Ottawa, Calgary, Edmonton, and Winnipeg, are among the smallest markets in not only the NHL, but across all five major North American professional leagues. The Canadian teams collect revenue and pay their expenses in Canadian dollars; however, per league rules, team payroll is paid out in US dollars, meaning Canadian owners' profits dwindle whenever the Canadian dollar trades well below its US counterpart. Seeing all seven miss the playoffs in 2016 hurt Canada as few things could.

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** Many teams, primarily those based in warm-weather southern markets, are financially struggling; many hockey purists blame expansion and relocation into the Southern US for the league's financial hardships as well as diluting the talent pool (though the last one [[http://espn.go.com/nhl/story/_/id/14334574/nhl-talent-dilution-not-blame-drop-goal-scoring is not as true as it seems]]); one such purist, the statistician Nate Silver (a big hockey fan--he grew up in Michigan), even attempted to back this argument up [[http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why-cant-canada-win-the-stanley-cup/ with the power of math]]! However, many Southern hockey fans argue that a hockey team at any level can thrive in the South under the right ownership.
** As much as hockey purists ''love'' to blame the league's 1990s southern expansion into the Southern US for its struggles, the expansion of the late 1960s and 1970s was possibly worse than the 1990s expansion, worse, as the league had expanded too quickly by more than tripling in size, first doubling from Original Six in 1967[[note]]Philadelphia Flyers, Pittsburgh Penguins, Minnesota North Stars (now Dallas Stars), St. Louis Blues, Oakland Seals (later Cleveland Barons), and Los Angeles Kings[[/note]] then adding 9 more teams[[note]]added Buffalo Sabres and Vancouver Canucks in 1970, added NY Islanders and Atlanta (now Calgary) Flames in 1972, added Kansas City Scouts (later Colorado Rockies, now New Jersey Devils) and Washington Capitals in 1974, contracted the Cleveland Barons in 1978, and added Quebec Nordiques (now Colorado Avalanche), Hartford Whalers (now Carolina Hurricanes), the original Winnipeg Jets (now Arizona Coyotes), and Edmonton Oilers in the WHA merger in 1979[[/note]] in just 13 years. Many of those expansion teams struggled both on and off the ice early on on[[note]]although the four former WHA clubs were deliberately crippled by the NHL, as detailed below[[/note]] with the Oakland Seals[=/=]Cleveland Barons franchise becoming one of the few major professional teams to fold since 1960.
** The league has seven Canadian teams. Canadian teams in predominately US-based leagues[[note]]Despite the NHL being formed in Montreal, its modern day headquarters is in New York City[[/note]] tend to be Butt Monkeys, and four of those teams, Ottawa, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa, and Winnipeg, are among the smallest markets in not only the NHL, but across all five major North American professional leagues. The Canadian teams collect revenue and pay their expenses in Canadian dollars; however, per league rules, team payroll is paid out in US dollars, meaning Canadian owners' profits dwindle whenever the Canadian dollar trades well below its US counterpart. Seeing all seven miss the playoffs in 2016 hurt Canada as few things could.



* The current Winnipeg Jets are the runt of not only the NHL, but among ''all'' of the teams in the five major North American professional leagues. With less than a million residents in its metro area, the team plays in the smallest standalone media market among professional sports in North America[[note]]Even though Green Bay is the ''absolute'' smallest pro sports market in North America, the Packers also claim the larger Milwaukee media market, and the state of Wisconsin is more than twice as populous than the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan ''combined''[[/note]]. The team plays in the league's smallest arena, Bell MTS Place, which seats only 15,000; even though it's considered a large, modern arena, it is undersized by NHL standards, meaning the Jets end up finishing in the bottom third in the league and dead last among Canadian teams for attendance despite having sell outs for all of their home games. Many top-tier free agents have Winnipeg on or near the top of their "no-move" lists because of the city's perception of being located out in the middle of nowhere and having nothing to do in the off-season. True North Sports and Entertainment originally sought to bring the ''original'' Winnipeg Jets, the Arizona Coyotes, home; however, the NHL instead persuaded True North to buy a bargain basement team in the [[ReplacementGoldfish former Atlanta Thrashers]], a team ran into the ground by its ex-owners (See Atlanta's section in "Cities in General" for more details). Aside from dysfunctional ownership in Atlanta, the only reason the NHL even considered returning to Winnipeg was [[MoneyDearBoy a then-strong Canadian dollar]]; if the Canadian dollar falls too far below its US counterpart as it did in the early '90s or if True North goes bankrupt, the Jets would be most likely the first Canadian team to be put up for relocation or contraction. The team had to spend their first two seasons in the Thrashers' place in the now-defunct Southeast Division, putting the team at a competitive and geographical disadvantage since their nearest divisional opponent was more than ''1500 miles'' away. And their attempt at getting the final seed of the East in 2013 still fell short! Realignment for 2013-14 hasn't helped much, as the Jets finished dead last in the reorganized Central Division. The Jets did make the playoffs in 2015 as the second wild card in the Western Conference, only to get swept in the first round by the Anaheim Ducks. Unlike the NFL's Cleveland Browns, MLS's San Jose Earthquakes, and the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, the Jets have not reclaimed the original franchise's history; [[ContinuitySnarl it's still tied to the Arizona Coyotes' history]][[note]]Despite the NHL owning the Coyotes in 2011, the league chose not to allow True North to reclaim the original Jets' history, only giving them rights to the intellectual property (i.e. the name and logos) of the original team[[/note]].

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* The current Winnipeg Jets are the runt of not only the NHL, but among ''all'' of the teams in the five major North American professional leagues. With less than a million residents in its metro area, the team plays in the smallest standalone media market among professional sports in North America[[note]]Even though Green Bay is the ''absolute'' smallest pro sports market in North America, the Packers also claim the larger Milwaukee media market, and the state of Wisconsin is more than twice as populous than the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan ''combined''[[/note]]. The team plays in the league's smallest arena, Bell MTS Place, which seats only 15,000; even though it's considered a large, modern arena, it is undersized by NHL standards, meaning the Jets end up finishing in near the bottom third in of the league and dead last among Canadian teams for attendance despite having sell outs for all of their home games. games being sold out for the foreseeable future. Many top-tier free agents have Winnipeg on or near the top of their "no-move" lists because of the city's perception of being located out in the middle of nowhere and having nothing to do in during the off-season. True North Sports and Entertainment originally sought to bring the ''original'' Winnipeg Jets, the Arizona Coyotes, home; however, the NHL instead persuaded True North to buy a bargain basement team in the [[ReplacementGoldfish former Atlanta Thrashers]], a team ran into the ground by its ex-owners (See Atlanta's section in "Cities in General" for more details). Aside from dysfunctional ownership in Atlanta, the only reason the NHL even considered returning to Winnipeg was [[MoneyDearBoy a then-strong Canadian dollar]]; loonie]]; if the Canadian dollar falls too far below its US counterpart as it did in the early '90s or if True North goes bankrupt, '90s, the Jets would be most likely the first Canadian team to be put up for relocation or contraction. The team had to spend their first two seasons in the Thrashers' place in the now-defunct Southeast Division, putting the team at a competitive and geographical disadvantage since their nearest divisional opponent was more than ''1500 miles'' away. And their attempt at getting the final seed of the East in 2013 still fell short! Realignment for 2013-14 hasn't helped much, as the Jets finished dead last in the reorganized Central Division. The Jets did make the playoffs in 2015 as the second wild card in the Western Conference, only to get swept in the first round by the Anaheim Ducks. Unlike the NFL's Cleveland Browns, MLS's San Jose Earthquakes, and the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, the Jets have not reclaimed the original franchise's history; [[ContinuitySnarl it's still tied to the Arizona Coyotes' history]][[note]]Despite the NHL owning the Coyotes in 2011, the league chose not to allow True North to reclaim the original Jets' history, history and retcon the Coyotes as a 1996 expansion team, only giving them rights to the intellectual property (i.e. the name and logos) of the original team[[/note]].



* Along with the Oilers, the three other teams which descended from the World Hockey Association, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the original Winnipeg Jets, were Butt Monkeys deliberately invoked by the NHL as punishment for forcing the NHL to overexpand in the 1970s. Unlike the American Basketball Association, where all four of its surviving teams (Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, New York[=/=]New Jersey[=/=]Brooklyn Nets, and San Antonio Spurs) remain in their respective post-merger markets to this day, only one WHA team, the Edmonton Oilers, is still in its post-merger market as of 2017. As part of the agreement to join the NHL, the four WHA teams' rosters were virtually gutted, the teams received no compensation for players reclaimed by the existing NHL teams and the teams were placed in the bottom of the order in the 1979 rookie draft, instead of at the top as is the standard practice for expansion teams. The four teams were among the smallest markets for any professional team, severely limiting their profit potential. By the 1990s, the four former WHA clubs were also playing in small, outdated arenas. An anemic Canadian dollar in the early 1990s forced the Nordiques and Jets down to Denver (as the Avalanche) and Phoenix (as the Coyotes), respectively, and the Oilers almost moved to Houston not long after Bud Adams moved the NFL's Oilers to Tennessee; however, an Edmonton-based consortium outbid Rockets' owner Leslie Alexander to keep the team in Alberta. The Whalers fared no better as they were essentially strong-armed by the old guard New York Rangers and Boston Bruins, ultimately moving to Raleigh, North Carolina (as the Hurricanes). Since then, the NHL returned to Winnipeg with the above-mentioned move of the Atlanta Thrashers, and Quebec City has built a new [=NHL-caliber=] arena, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_Vidéotron Centre Videotron]], with hopes of reviving the Nordiques.

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* Along with the Oilers, the three other teams which descended from the World Hockey Association, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the original Winnipeg Jets, were Butt Monkeys deliberately invoked by the NHL as punishment for forcing the NHL to overexpand in the 1970s. Unlike the American Basketball Association, where all four of its surviving teams (Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, New York[=/=]New Jersey[=/=]Brooklyn Nets, and San Antonio Spurs) remain in their respective post-merger markets to this day, only one WHA team, the Edmonton Oilers, is still in its post-merger market as of 2017. As part of the agreement to join the NHL, the four WHA teams' rosters were virtually gutted, the teams received no compensation for players reclaimed by the existing NHL teams and the teams were placed in the bottom of the order in the 1979 rookie draft, instead of at the top as is the standard practice for expansion teams. The four teams were among the smallest markets for any professional team, severely limiting their profit potential. By the 1990s, the four former WHA clubs were also playing in small, outdated arenas. An anemic Canadian dollar in the early 1990s forced the Nordiques and Jets down to Denver (as the Avalanche) and Phoenix (as the Coyotes), respectively, and the Oilers almost moved to Houston not long after Bud Adams moved the NFL's Oilers to Tennessee; however, an Edmonton-based consortium outbid Rockets' owner Leslie Alexander to keep the team in Alberta. The Whalers fared no better as they were essentially strong-armed by the old guard New York Rangers and Boston Bruins, Bruins (and to some extent, the New York Islanders and New Jersey Devils as well), ultimately moving to Raleigh, North Carolina (as the Hurricanes). Since then, the NHL returned to Winnipeg with the above-mentioned move of the Atlanta Thrashers, and Quebec City has built a new [=NHL-caliber=] arena, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_Vidéotron Centre Videotron]], with hopes of reviving the Nordiques.Nordiques by either expansion or relocation.
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