History BrokenAesop / VideoGames

9th Aug '16 5:39:44 AM starofjusticev21
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** In fact, getting a particular special weapon almost requires this. The key needed to get it is hidden in an alcove high in the room in your hideout where all your money is stored. To get it, you need to accumulate 5,000,000 gold to climb up a hill of coins to reach the key. Now that you have the key, where's the chest it opens? Underneath all that gold, which you now have to get rid of access the chest. Technically you could ''spend'' all that money to reveal the chest, but with how far 5,000,000 goes in that game (plus how merchants keep a limited stock, meaning you can't just go to the alchemist and buy 5,000,000 worth of healing potions even if you have 5,000,000 to spend) and the hefty property income you probably have coming in every few minutes by that point, by far the quickest and simplest way to reveal the chest is to just funnel all that money into the royal treasury. Now you not only have a special weapon, the treasury has a big chunk of the amount it needs to keep all your subjects alive, and you're beloved by your people for generously donating your personal fortune to the kingdom like that.

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** In fact, getting a particular special weapon almost requires this. The key needed to get it is hidden in an alcove high in the room in your hideout where all your money is stored. To get it, you need to accumulate 5,000,000 gold to climb up a hill of coins to reach the key. Now that you have the key, where's the chest it opens? Underneath all that gold, which you now have to get rid of access the chest. Technically you could ''spend'' all that money to reveal the chest, but with how far 5,000,000 goes in that game (plus how merchants keep a limited stock, meaning you can't just go to the alchemist and buy 5,000,000 worth of healing potions even if you have 5,000,000 to spend) and your attempts to get rid of that money being offset by the hefty property income you probably have coming in every few minutes by that point, by far the quickest and simplest way to reveal the chest is to just funnel all that money into the royal treasury. Now you not only have a special weapon, the treasury has a big chunk of the amount it needs to keep all your subjects alive, and you're beloved by your people for generously donating your personal fortune to the kingdom like that.
8th Aug '16 5:21:40 AM starofjusticev21
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** In fact, getting a particular special weapon almost requires this. The key needed to get it is hidden in an alcove high in the room in your hideout where all your money is stored. To get it, you need to accumulate 5,000,000 gold to climb up a hill of coins to reach the key. Now that you have the key, where's the chest it opens? Underneath all that gold, which you now have to get rid of access the chest. Technically you could ''spend'' all that money to reveal the chest, but with how far 5,000,000 goes in that game and the hefty property income you probably have coming in every few minutes by that point, by far the quickest and simplest way to reveal the chest is to just funnel all that money into the royal treasury. Now you not only have a special weapon, the treasury has a big chunk of the amount it needs to keep all your subjects alive, and you're beloved by your people for generously donating your personal fortune to the kingdom like that.

to:

** In fact, getting a particular special weapon almost requires this. The key needed to get it is hidden in an alcove high in the room in your hideout where all your money is stored. To get it, you need to accumulate 5,000,000 gold to climb up a hill of coins to reach the key. Now that you have the key, where's the chest it opens? Underneath all that gold, which you now have to get rid of access the chest. Technically you could ''spend'' all that money to reveal the chest, but with how far 5,000,000 goes in that game (plus how merchants keep a limited stock, meaning you can't just go to the alchemist and buy 5,000,000 worth of healing potions even if you have 5,000,000 to spend) and the hefty property income you probably have coming in every few minutes by that point, by far the quickest and simplest way to reveal the chest is to just funnel all that money into the royal treasury. Now you not only have a special weapon, the treasury has a big chunk of the amount it needs to keep all your subjects alive, and you're beloved by your people for generously donating your personal fortune to the kingdom like that.
7th Aug '16 1:53:23 PM starofjusticev21
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* In ''VideoGame/FableIII'', you, the ruler of the kingdom, must choose between "good" decisions (mostly benevolent social programs) that cost the kingdom money, and "evil" decisions (cutting off said programs, poor environmental practices, etc.) that save the kingdom money, all in preparation for a supernatural invasion that will kill off many of your citizens if you don't put enough funding into the defense budget. Making this more difficult are that the two options are either tear-jerkingly saccharine (repair and upgrade the damaged orphanage) or ludicrously evil (turn the orphanage into a brothel); there is no third option, even to defer to later, and you cannot remind anyone that ''doom is barreling down on them'' and maybe this isn't the best time to disturb the King with their crap. The intended moral appears to be about having to make hard decisions about security vs. prosperity / quality of life. The problem with this that it's possible to pad the kingdom's treasury out of your own pocket. Like in the previous game, the way you really make money is by buying up lots of property and letting the accumulated rent money roll in every few minutes of play time. And despite there being a countdown to the day of the invasion, it won't get any closer as long as you don't complete any main storyline quests. All the player needs to do to be able to bankroll all the "good" programs and still be able to save all of their subjects is kill a couple hours doing sidequests and letting their income pile up.
** In fact, getting a particular special weapon almost requires this. The key needed to get it is hidden in an alcove high in the room in your hideout where all your money is stored. To get it, you need to accumulate 5,000,000 gold to climb up a hill of coins to reach the key. Now that you have the key, where's the chest it opens? Underneath all that gold, which you now have to get rid of access the chest. Technically you could ''spend'' all that money to reveal the chest, but with how far 5,000,000 goes in that game and the hefty property income you probably have coming in every few minutes by that point, by far the quickest and simplest way to reveal the chest is to just funnel all that money into the royal treasury. Now you not only have a special weapon, the treasury has a hefty chunk of the amount it needs to keep all your subjects alive, and you're beloved by your people for generously donating your personal fortune to the kingdom like that.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/FableIII'', you, the ruler of the kingdom, must choose between "good" decisions (mostly benevolent social programs) that cost the kingdom money, and "evil" decisions (cutting off said programs, poor environmental practices, etc.) that save the kingdom money, all in preparation for a supernatural invasion that will kill off many of your citizens if you don't put enough funding into the defense budget. Making this more difficult are that the two options are either tear-jerkingly saccharine (repair and upgrade the damaged orphanage) or ludicrously evil (turn the orphanage into a brothel); there is no third option, even to defer to later, and you cannot remind anyone that ''doom is barreling down on them'' and maybe this isn't the best time to disturb the King with their crap. The intended moral appears to be about having to make hard decisions about security vs. prosperity / quality of life. The problem with this that it's possible to pad the kingdom's treasury out of your own pocket. Like in the previous game, the way you really make money is by buying up lots of property and letting the accumulated rent money roll in every few minutes of play time. And despite there being a countdown to the day of the invasion, it won't get any closer as long as you don't complete any main storyline quests. All the player needs to do to be able to bankroll all the "good" programs and still be able to save all of their subjects is kill a couple few hours doing sidequests and letting their income pile up.
** In fact, getting a particular special weapon almost requires this. The key needed to get it is hidden in an alcove high in the room in your hideout where all your money is stored. To get it, you need to accumulate 5,000,000 gold to climb up a hill of coins to reach the key. Now that you have the key, where's the chest it opens? Underneath all that gold, which you now have to get rid of access the chest. Technically you could ''spend'' all that money to reveal the chest, but with how far 5,000,000 goes in that game and the hefty property income you probably have coming in every few minutes by that point, by far the quickest and simplest way to reveal the chest is to just funnel all that money into the royal treasury. Now you not only have a special weapon, the treasury has a hefty big chunk of the amount it needs to keep all your subjects alive, and you're beloved by your people for generously donating your personal fortune to the kingdom like that.
27th Jul '16 3:04:31 AM PurpleAlert
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** This is encapsulated with a scene near the end: [[spoiler: Max wins the contest, takes a trip with her class to accept the award, and everything is perfect... but then Chloe calls her in a panic because the tornado is about to kill her, and Max must drop this happy future to save her. The moral breaks ''again'' because the only reason Chloe isn't safely on the trip is because she was expelled due to her behavior, and everyone ''else'' Max shows any care for is already on the trip with her and out of harm's way. The only way to end that scene is to rescue Chloe at your own expense, again.]]
16th Jul '16 8:18:33 AM mario0987
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** ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' breaks it's own moral too. The primary theme of the game is that the current justice system is terrible and in need of a major change. This change comes at the end of the game with the implementation of a jury. The trouble is that the system uses a computer that can show the jurors evidence and conversations that are not present during the trials, including one piece of evidence that is specifically stated to not be admissible in court. Also Phoenix is clearly using the system to bring an old adversary to justice and clear his name for using forged evidence giving him a personal stake. Finally, [[AbortedArc the jury system is never mentioned again after this game.]]
16th Jul '16 4:10:08 AM NNinja
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* A very minor one, but in ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'', Apollo rants about what the point is in a legal system that protects criminals. This remark doesn't make much sense though, when you consider that the real problem should be about why the legal system seems to make it so easy to wrongly accuse someone, yet so difficult to prove a wrongly-accused client's innocence. The system doesn't protect criminals, since someone is always going to be convicted no matter who it is. It's likely that the wording of the line was just unclear though.

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* A very minor one, but in ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'', Apollo rants about what the point is in a legal system that protects criminals. This remark doesn't make much sense though, when you consider that the real problem should be about why the legal system seems to make it so easy to wrongly accuse someone, yet so difficult to prove a wrongly-accused client's innocence. The system doesn't protect criminals, since someone is always going to be convicted no matter who it is. It's likely that the wording of the line was just unclear though.''Franchise/AceAttorney'':


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** ExecutiveMeddling in ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' broke initially intact aesop from ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyTrialsAndTribulations''. The message in the game was that even if something is broken it can be rebuilt, better than before. This is brought up mostly in context of relationships between [[HappilyMarried Ron and Dessie]] and Phoenix and [[spoiler: [[NewOldFlame Iris]]]](with broken and rebuilt urn thrown in for symbolism). The second relationship was initially based on a lie, and the game ends with them seemingly coming back together with no more lies between them. If Phoenix's story ended here and now [[WhatCouldHaveBeen as was initially planned]] the Aesop would've remained intact. However the next game brought Phoenix back while almost outright stating that he's not in relationship with anyone[[labelnote: details]] His adoptive daughter Trucy said a few times that he needs to find her "a new mommy" which wouldn't make sense if he was with someone[[/labelnote]] so he and [[spoiler: Iris]] either broke up again in the meantime or never reconciled in the first place, either way the rebuilt relationship didn't work after all.
14th Jul '16 11:10:49 AM Quanyails
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* [[WordOfGod According to the developers]] of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout|1}}'', the risk of a Broken Aesop was why one of the MultipleEndings for the town of Junktown was changed. The player has to decide between aiding a sherrif or a sleazy casino owner. Originally, the ending for assisting the Sheriff reveals that he [[spoiler:becomes a low-grade KnightTemplar]], and Junktown [[spoiler:stays small because people avoid the hassle]]. Assist the sleazy casino owner, though, and Junktown [[spoiler:thrives, because [[EvenEvilHasStandards the sleazy casino owner understands that slavers, drug users, and actively immoral people are bad for his business, and wipes them out]]]]. In the game proper, though, the Sheriff is the 'good' choice.

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* [[WordOfGod According to the developers]] of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout|1}}'', the risk of a Broken Aesop was why one of the MultipleEndings for the town of Junktown was changed. The player has to decide between aiding a sherrif sheriff or a sleazy casino owner. Originally, the ending for assisting the Sheriff reveals that he [[spoiler:becomes a low-grade KnightTemplar]], and Junktown [[spoiler:stays small because people avoid the hassle]]. Assist the sleazy casino owner, though, and Junktown [[spoiler:thrives, because [[EvenEvilHasStandards the sleazy casino owner understands that slavers, drug users, and actively immoral people are bad for his business, and wipes them out]]]]. In the game proper, though, the Sheriff is the 'good' choice.
10th Jul '16 5:40:04 AM PurpleAlert
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* ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange'' has a lot to say about assertiveness, decisions, and consequences, and having the courage to make the most of your gifts and achieve your dreams. But then the endings happen. [[spoiler: Sacrificing Chloe means negating everything you did for the entire game so that it never happened, but all the loose ends tie themselves up anyway, so Max essentially saves the day by hiding in a bathroom stall and deliberately choosing not to act. Sacrificing Arcadia Bay means Max and Chloe ride off into the sunset with no consequences at all, because the tornado that Max caused ''inadvertently'' has destroyed everything that was stopping them from doing exactly that from the beginning.]]
8th Jul '16 12:32:07 AM MsDevin92
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* ''VideoGame/Persona4'' will spend the entire game beating you over the head with how important it is to accept the truth, no matter how awful it is. This is consistent for most of the game, until you get to some of the social links. They have a tendency to backpedal on the message by presenting a personal conflict, taking steps to resolve that conflict, and then concluding it by ''not'' resolving the conflict and realizing that the thing that made them miserable the whole game is really just the thing that makes them happy. [[ValuesDissonance It also means they don't rock Japanese society's boat.]]

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* ''VideoGame/Persona4'' will spend the entire game beating you over the head with how important it is to accept the truth, no matter how awful it is. This is consistent for most of the game, until you get to some of the social links. They have a tendency to backpedal on the message by presenting a personal conflict, taking steps to resolve that conflict, and then concluding it by ''not'' resolving the conflict and realizing that the thing that made them miserable the whole game is really just the thing that makes them happy. [[ValuesDissonance It also means they don't rock Japanese society's boat.]]]]
** [[AlphaBitch Ai Ebihara's]] backstory is that she was bullied for [[FormerlyFat being overweight as a child]], and eventually she comes to the conclusion that beauty isn't about the way you look, but the sort of person you are. However, the cast's classmate Hanako is just about every negative stereotype of a fat girl rolled into one; sure, her personality isn't the best (not that she's ever given the chance for CharacterDevelopment outside of a small instance of PetTheDog), but it's obvious that every scene where she's treated as the butt of the joke has to do with her appearance...and the fact that she ''doesn't'' care about how she looks, which would otherwise be a great message for a game that's so obsessed with staying true to yourself. In fact, just about every JerkAss in the game is ''also'' [[{{Gonk}} extremely unattractive]], something fans have criticized a fair amount.
7th Jul '16 7:57:07 PM KingLyger
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* The main plot thread of ''VideoGame/TalesOfLegendia'' resolves when Shirley realizes that just because Senel doesn't love her romantically doesn't mean that he doesn't care about her, AnAesop that a man and a woman can deeply care about each other without the need for romance. The second half of the game has Senel and Shirley get engaged, breaking the Aesop.

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* The main plot thread of ''VideoGame/TalesOfLegendia'' resolves when Shirley realizes that just because Senel doesn't love her romantically doesn't mean that he doesn't care about her, AnAesop that a man and a woman can deeply care about each other without the need for romance. The second half of the game has Senel Chloe's entire Character Quest be about her romantic feelings for Senel, and Shirley get engaged, breaking the Aesop.ends not when she gets over her need to be with Senel, but when she steps aside for Shirley, who ends up engaged to Senel!
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