History BrokenAesop / VideoGames

16th Apr '17 4:59:30 PM Kadorhal
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*** Which is made worse at the end of the game, when [[spoiler:Alicia]] chooses to completely abandon her Valkyria powers, solely because of the stress the InternalizedCategorism was putting on her. So, racism is bad, but if you're from a bad race, it's better to just pretend you're not and act like everyone else. [[ValuesDissonance Can you tell this game was made in Japan?]]

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*** Which is made worse at the end of the game, when [[spoiler:Alicia]] chooses to completely abandon her Valkyria powers, solely because of the stress the InternalizedCategorism was putting on her. So, racism is bad, bad... but there are still bad races anyway, and if you're from a bad race, one of them, it's better to just pretend you're not and act like everyone else. [[ValuesDissonance Can you tell this game was made in Japan?]]



** [[DesignatedEvil Faldio]] is imprisoned for committing treason by awakening [[spoiler:Alicia]]'s Valkyria powers because doing so required her to have a near-death experience, so he shot her. Later, he apologizes for believing that power is the key to victory [[spoiler:and dies in order to [[DeathEqualsRedemption prove his sincerity]]]], driving home any of the game's anti-war aesops. But if he ''hadn't'' done it, Selvaria would have completely obliterated the army ''and'' the militia, and conquered Gallia in time for tea and ''thusly achieved victory for her side''-- he openly lampshades this at one point.
*** Faldio and Welkin had been friends for years, but when Faldio finally comes around to realizing that he was wrong (even if the events of the game prove he was right) and apologizes, [[spoiler: pointlessly kills himself]], Welkin and Alicia don't react to it any more than they reacted to Ghirlandaio. Friendship and unity, everybody!
*** On top of that, Faldio's big crime is, as stated by the game, believing in power instead of his friends... except not only did the power in question ''actually save the day'', he knew that that power ''belonged'' to one of his friends and his plan ''depended'' on her survival. The activation isn't pleasant by any means, but nothing about the situation meant he was actually choosing the one or the other. If anything, he knew he was risking his career ''because he believed in the power of his friends''.
*** There's another problem with condemning Faldio for believing in power instead of just trusting his friends to find a solution on their own: '''They never actually find a way to deal with Selvaria.''' She is eventually defeated, but that's because [[spoiler: she throws the fight and then kills herself to wipe out the Gallian military after she's captured.]] We're supposed to hate Faldio for not being open to ThePowerOfFriendship, but we're shown multiple times that the only thing that can stop a Valkyria... is a Valkyria.
** While it is pay for DLC, they actually portray one of the Gallian commanders as a heartless bastard by having him use a poison forbidden by their "Geneva convention" against his enemies, and after he loses the commander tells his higher ups that his squad had the poison used against them.

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** [[DesignatedEvil Faldio]] is imprisoned for committing treason by awakening [[spoiler:Alicia]]'s Valkyria powers because doing so required her to have a near-death experience, so he shot her. Later, he apologizes for believing that power is the key to victory [[spoiler:and dies in order to [[DeathEqualsRedemption prove his sincerity]]]], driving home any of the game's anti-war aesops. But if he ''hadn't'' done it, Selvaria would have completely obliterated the army ''and'' the militia, and conquered Gallia in time for tea and ''thusly achieved victory for her side''-- side'' -- he openly lampshades this at one point.
*** Faldio and Welkin had been friends for years, but when Faldio finally comes around to realizing that he was wrong (even if the events of the game prove he was right) and right), apologizes, [[spoiler: [[spoiler:and pointlessly kills himself]], Welkin and Alicia don't react to it any more than they reacted to Ghirlandaio. Friendship and unity, everybody!
*** On top of that, Faldio's big crime is, as stated by the game, believing in power instead of his friends... except not only did the power in question ''actually save the day'', he knew that that power ''belonged'' to one of his friends and his plan ''depended'' on her survival. The activation isn't pleasant by any means, but nothing about the situation meant he was actually choosing the one or the other. If anything, he knew he was risking his career ''because he believed in the power of '''of''' his friends''.
*** There's another problem with condemning Faldio for believing in power instead of just trusting his friends to find a solution on their own: '''They never actually find a way to deal with Selvaria.''' She is eventually defeated, but that's because [[spoiler: she [[spoiler:she throws the fight and then [[TakingYouWithMe kills herself to wipe out the Gallian military military]] after she's captured.]] We're supposed to hate Faldio for not being open to ThePowerOfFriendship, but we're shown multiple times that the only thing that can stop a Valkyria... is a Valkyria.
** While it is pay for pay-for DLC, they actually portray one of the Gallian commanders as a heartless bastard by having him use a poison forbidden by their "Geneva convention" equivalent of the Geneva convention against his enemies, and after he loses the commander loses, tells his higher ups that his squad had the poison used against them.''them''.



** The anti-racism Aesop is driven with the Darcsen being a fantasy counterpart to European Jews in its World War II pastiche, but the most prominent Darcsen character is written and designed to appeal to its original Japanese audience [[spoiler: in order to maximize the impact of her death]]. Appreciating other cultures and not judging them for being different is a lot easier when [[YamatoNadeshiko they embody your own culture's ideals!]].

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** The anti-racism Aesop is driven with the Darcsen being a fantasy counterpart to European Jews in its World War II pastiche, but the most prominent Darcsen character is written and designed to appeal to its original Japanese audience [[spoiler: in [[spoiler:in order to maximize the impact of her death]]. Appreciating other cultures and not judging them for being different is a lot easier when [[YamatoNadeshiko they embody your own culture's ideals!]].ideals instead!]]



* Creator/{{Godlimations}}' ''Vorago'' bases its story off of the Biblical description of Rapture, and has as its primary conflict a battle of ideals between a character who believes the apocalyptic events have a logical, scientific explanation and another who thinks it was prophesied by the Bible. As the creator of the game is a Christian organization, it seems reasonable to think that the latter would be correct... except the man who is portrayed as "in the right" (and indeed, the only confirmed Christian in the game period) is the ''villain'', who shoots two separate characters for disagreeing with his interpretation, tries to sexually assault the female main character and threatens a young child immediately after, and is so racist (brings up his problems with the Dutch completely out of the blue in the first conversation with him), intolerant (see the two shootings above), and preachy that he comes off as an amalgam of every religious strawman ever cooked up by an atheist writer.

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* Creator/{{Godlimations}}' ''Vorago'' bases its story off of the Biblical description of the Rapture, and has as its primary conflict a battle of ideals between a character who believes the apocalyptic events have a logical, scientific explanation and another who thinks it was prophesied by the Bible. As the creator of the game is a Christian organization, it seems reasonable to think that the latter would be correct... except the man who is portrayed as "in the right" (and indeed, the only confirmed Christian in the game period) is the ''villain'', who shoots two separate characters with little prompting (one for disagreeing with his interpretation, interpretation of what's going on, and another for having a problem with the first time), tries to sexually assault the female main character and threatens a young child immediately after, and is so racist (brings up his problems with the Dutch completely out of the blue in the first conversation with him), intolerant (see the two shootings above), and preachy that he comes off as an amalgam of every religious strawman ever cooked up by an atheist writer.



*** The full explanation is that Ted at the time was under a drug that made him act that way; the sanity call was from people trying to use ''current'' sanity as evidence that the previous insanity was caused by something else, since it's no longer present. But then it falls apart all over again as Ted continues to do extreme things like beating the player character to death for no reason whenever you fail the interview with him in the third part, escaping police custody, and holding you at gunpoint because he's "got nothing to lose" ("nothing" including '''''his still-hidden children whose disappearance inspired those atrocities'''''), all while in his normal state of mind. Add to that, he doesn't express any real regret for his past actions while under the drug, even going so far as to try to justify them as things anyone would have done at the time.
** The games often fail in their goal to teach you about negotiation, in the fact that nobody really comes to an agreement on anything, and you're mostly just telling people what they want to hear, or offering decisions that really make no sense. Episode 9 even allows you to sit back and let someone else do your work.

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*** The full explanation is that Ted at the time was under a drug that made him act that way; the sanity call was from people trying to use ''current'' sanity as evidence that the previous insanity was caused by something else, since it's no longer present. But then it falls apart all over again as Ted continues to do extreme things like beating the player character to death for no reason whenever you fail the interview with him in the third part, escaping police custody, custody multiple times (even if [[spoiler:people behind the scenes are deliberately letting him out - but even that's to pin their own crimes on him, because they ''know'' he'll take the option every time]]), and holding you at gunpoint because he's "got nothing to lose" ("nothing" including '''''his still-hidden children whose disappearance inspired those atrocities'''''), all while in his normal state of mind. Add to that, he doesn't express any real regret for his past actions while under the drug, even going so far as to try to justify them as things anyone would have done at the time.
** The games often fail in their goal to teach you about negotiation, in the fact that nobody really comes to an agreement on anything, and you're mostly just telling people what they want to hear, or offering decisions that really make no sense. Episode 9 even allows you to sit back and let someone else do your work.work if and when you fail to complete it on your own a few times.



*** If your bike gets stolen, don't ask a teacher for help, because [[AdultsAreUseless he's more interested in showing off how much more clever he is than his students than actually solving the problem]]. In this ''anti-bullying'' game, you're more likely to get results by chasing the thief, shoving him off your bike, and taking it back yourself; you can always correct a mistake you made yourself, but once you involve a teacher, you're essentially putting all your faith in a very powerful idiot. It doesn't help if you've played any of the other Zap Dramatic games, and you know that, [[CreatorsPet no matter what Zap Dramatic wants you to believe,]] Mr. Hartrup is ''pants-on-head insane''.
*** The stolen bike puzzle itself breaks its own moral because the lesson is not to make assumptions. The bike isn't being stolen, but another kid, whom you've never seen before, is riding an identical bike and taunting you about how you can't catch him as he speeds away from the place where you left your own bike unattended. It gives you the option to look for your own bike first (knowing the other kid will definitely get away if you don't give chase ''right now''), but if you take it, you get a congratulations message about how you're one of the rare few who wouldn't see all these things and ''not'' assume your bike is being stolen - [[ButThouMust and then you're told the story can't continue if you don't go through the mistaken thief subplot, and takes you back to the branch to choose to assume the bike is stolen.]]

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*** If your bike gets stolen, don't ask a teacher for help, because [[AdultsAreUseless he's more interested in showing off how much more clever he is than his students than actually solving the problem]]. In this ''anti-bullying'' game, you're more likely to get results by chasing the thief, shoving him off your bike, and taking it back yourself; you can always correct a mistake you made yourself, but once you involve a teacher, you're essentially putting all your faith in a very powerful idiot. It doesn't help if you've played any of that Mr. Hartrup is more or less meant to be the other Zap Dramatic games, same character as Ted from ''Ambition'' - and you know that, [[CreatorsPet no matter what Zap Dramatic wants you to believe,]] Mr. Hartrup believe]], he is ''pants-on-head ''one hundred percent pants-on-head insane''.
*** The stolen bike puzzle itself breaks its own moral because the lesson is not to make assumptions. The bike isn't being stolen, but another kid, whom you've never seen before, is riding an identical bike and taunting you about how you can't catch him as he speeds away from the place where you left your own bike unattended. It gives you the option to look for your own bike first (knowing the other kid will definitely get away if you don't give chase ''right now''), but if you take it, you get a congratulations message about how you're one of the rare few who wouldn't see all these things and ''not'' assume your bike is being stolen - [[ButThouMust and then you're told the story can't continue if you don't go through the mistaken thief subplot, and takes you back to the branch to choose to assume the bike is stolen.]]]] For good measure, it then also assumes that, since you're one of the few who wouldn't react to a situation with violence, you're probably better off playing as a girl.
25th Mar '17 12:43:13 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** [[WordOfGod According to the developers]] of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', the risk of a Broken Aesop was why one of the MultipleEndings for the town of Junktown was changed. The player has to decide between aiding a sheriff or a sleazy casino owner. Originally, the ending for assisting the Sheriff reveals that he [[spoiler:becomes a low-grade KnightTemplar]], and Junktown [[spoiler:stays small because people avoid the hassle]]. Assist the sleazy casino owner, though, and Junktown [[spoiler:thrives, because [[EvenEvilHasStandards the sleazy casino owner understands that slavers, drug users, and actively immoral people are bad for his business, and wipes them out]]]]. In the game proper, though, the Sheriff is the 'good' choice.

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** [[WordOfGod According to the developers]] of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', the risk of a Broken Aesop was why one of the MultipleEndings for the town of Junktown was changed. The player has to decide between aiding a sheriff or a sleazy casino owner. Originally, the ending for assisting the Sheriff reveals that he [[spoiler:becomes a low-grade KnightTemplar]], and Junktown [[spoiler:stays small because people avoid the hassle]]. Assist the sleazy casino owner, though, and Junktown [[spoiler:thrives, because [[EvenEvilHasStandards [[PragmaticVillainy the sleazy casino owner understands that slavers, drug users, and actively immoral people are bad for his business, and wipes them out]]]]. In the game proper, though, the Sheriff is the 'good' choice.
21st Feb '17 2:33:47 PM Bugfragged
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* ''VideoGame/NocturneRebirth'' emphasizes that it's possible for anyone to change for the better, including Reviel, the VillainProtagonist. However, this aesop doesn't apply to the non-Ancestor Devils, who are mentally programmed to be AlwaysChaoticEvil. As such, Reviel's attempts to reason with one of the more sentient Devils fall flat.
21st Feb '17 12:58:08 PM StarSword
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* [[WordOfGod According to the developers]] of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout|1}}'', the risk of a Broken Aesop was why one of the MultipleEndings for the town of Junktown was changed. The player has to decide between aiding a sheriff or a sleazy casino owner. Originally, the ending for assisting the Sheriff reveals that he [[spoiler:becomes a low-grade KnightTemplar]], and Junktown [[spoiler:stays small because people avoid the hassle]]. Assist the sleazy casino owner, though, and Junktown [[spoiler:thrives, because [[EvenEvilHasStandards the sleazy casino owner understands that slavers, drug users, and actively immoral people are bad for his business, and wipes them out]]]]. In the game proper, though, the Sheriff is the 'good' choice.
* Unfortunately, Bethesda wasn't so smart with ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and its infamous Tenpenny Tower questline. In synopsis, there is a conflict revolving around a heavily fortified and luxuriant hotel between a thuggish band of wandering [[OurZombiesAreDifferent Ghouls]] who want in and the existing human inhabitants, who are rather displeased with the motion. The player can either murder one party on behalf of the other, or go through the trouble of diplomatically convincing the humans that these ghouls can be trusted and so earn them a place inside the tower, which is big enough for them all. Except that, afterwards, you find [[spoiler:the ghouls have murdered the human inhabitants and dumped them in the basement while you weren't looking]]. Now, this could easily pull off any (or all) of three {{Family Unfriendly Aesop}}s: the oppressed can be as bad as their oppressors when given the chance, diplomacy doesn't always work, you can't always get a happy ending. Except the game is very clearly aiming for you to ''support the ghouls'', to the point of giving Good Karma when you get the ghouls inside and causing Three Dog to hound you incessantly for "racism" if you murder the ghouls instead. Even if this comes ''after'' TheReveal. This has frustrated many a player, since the blatant anti-racism motif to the quest is undercut by A: the fact you can convince the humans that they were wrong to be racist to begin with and B: the ghouls are just as racist, as shown by their [[spoiler: ''murdering the humans once you get them in'']].
** Speaking of which, Roy, the leader of the ghouls, tries to convince you to side with him because of the [[FantasticRacism bigotry]] of Tenpenny Tower's human residents. Except that, if you do, one of the ways he suggests you can get him and his followers inside is by opening a door into the underground tunnels inside so he can herd waves of feral ghouls in as CannonFodder. So, it's okay for ghouls to abuse other ghouls, but not okay for humans to do the same?
** The actual ''narrative'' of the Fallout series does not shy away from pointing out that DrugsAreBad, as they are produced and sold almost exclusively by terrible people and used by people who are, at absolute best, 'troubled.' They also come with the risk of addiction, even for the player, and some fairly severe stat penalties. However... addiction applies ONLY these vague numeric penalties, and addictions can be removed nigh-effortlessly by certain cheap and readily available methods. So, for the player, [[DrugsAreGood drugs are awesome]] and should be used copiously for great bonuses.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'':
**
[[WordOfGod According to the developers]] of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout|1}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', the risk of a Broken Aesop was why one of the MultipleEndings for the town of Junktown was changed. The player has to decide between aiding a sheriff or a sleazy casino owner. Originally, the ending for assisting the Sheriff reveals that he [[spoiler:becomes a low-grade KnightTemplar]], and Junktown [[spoiler:stays small because people avoid the hassle]]. Assist the sleazy casino owner, though, and Junktown [[spoiler:thrives, because [[EvenEvilHasStandards the sleazy casino owner understands that slavers, drug users, and actively immoral people are bad for his business, and wipes them out]]]]. In the game proper, though, the Sheriff is the 'good' choice.
* ** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'':
***
Unfortunately, Bethesda wasn't so smart with ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and its the infamous Tenpenny Tower questline. In synopsis, there is a conflict revolving around a heavily fortified and luxuriant hotel between a thuggish band of wandering [[OurZombiesAreDifferent Ghouls]] who want in and the existing human inhabitants, who are rather displeased with the motion. The player can either murder one party on behalf of the other, or go through the trouble of diplomatically convincing the humans that these ghouls can be trusted and so earn them a place inside the tower, which is big enough for them all. Except that, afterwards, you find [[spoiler:the ghouls have murdered the human inhabitants and dumped them in the basement while you weren't looking]]. Now, this could easily pull off any (or all) of three {{Family Unfriendly Aesop}}s: the oppressed can be as bad as their oppressors when given the chance, diplomacy doesn't always work, you can't always get a happy ending. Except the game is very clearly aiming for you to ''support the ghouls'', to the point of giving Good Karma when you get the ghouls inside and causing Three Dog to hound you incessantly for "racism" if you murder the ghouls instead. Even if this comes ''after'' TheReveal. This has frustrated many a player, since the blatant anti-racism motif to the quest is undercut by A: the fact you can convince the humans that they were wrong to be racist to begin with and B: the ghouls are just as racist, as shown by their [[spoiler: ''murdering the humans once you get them in'']].
** *** Speaking of which, Roy, the leader of the ghouls, tries to convince you to side with him because of the [[FantasticRacism bigotry]] of Tenpenny Tower's human residents. Except that, if you do, one of the ways he suggests you can get him and his followers inside is by opening a door into the underground tunnels inside so he can herd waves of feral ghouls in as CannonFodder. So, it's okay for ghouls to abuse other ghouls, but not okay for humans to do the same?
** *** The actual ''narrative'' of the Fallout series does not shy away from pointing out that DrugsAreBad, as they are produced and sold almost exclusively by terrible people and used by people who are, at absolute best, 'troubled.' They also come with the risk of addiction, even for the player, and some fairly severe stat penalties. However... addiction applies ONLY these vague numeric penalties, and addictions can be removed nigh-effortlessly by certain cheap and readily available methods. So, for the player, [[DrugsAreGood drugs are awesome]] and should be used copiously for great bonuses.
19th Feb '17 8:41:42 PM Zaptech
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* ''VideoGame/StardewValley'' is a charming game where you play as an office drone who inherits their grandfather's farm in the titular valley. Get out of [[SoulSuckingRetailJob the rat race]]. [[CallToAgriculture Go live a new, simple life in the country]]. Rediscover the things that really matter, like [[ThePowerOfLove love]], [[ThePowerOfFriendship friendships]] and [[GreenAesop a connection with nature]]. Oh, and make sure to ''make a million gold'' while you're at it, as that's the single biggest part of [[spoiler:your grandfather's evaluation at the end of Year 3.]]
10th Feb '17 4:34:31 PM Valiona
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*** There's a little aside where you can stand up for a girl being picked on. If you do, you get a colorful animated musical number where you and the girl rock out to her anti-bullying song... which is kind of an amateur emo-rock hate song about how much better she is than the other kids. It doesn't help that if you ''don't'' stand up for her, she does the song anyway, and she pretty much just dances by herself in a mundane school hallway, utterly submerged in her own imagination and making everybody else kind of uncomfortable. Even before that, the other kids point out that she gets picked on ''because'' she's an outspoken braggart who pushes other kids around; in one of the classroom scenes, she actually punches another student for no apparent reason.
* ''VideoGame/Persona4'' will spend the entire game beating you over the head with how important it is to accept the truth, no matter how awful it is. This is consistent for most of the game, until you get to some of the social links. They have a tendency to backpedal on the message by presenting a personal conflict, taking steps to resolve that conflict, and then concluding it by ''not'' resolving the conflict and realizing that the thing that made them miserable the whole game is really just the thing that makes them happy. [[ValuesDissonance It also means they don't rock Japanese society's boat.]]
** [[AlphaBitch Ai Ebihara's]] backstory is that she was bullied for [[FormerlyFat being overweight as a child]], and eventually she comes to the conclusion that beauty isn't about the way you look, but the sort of person you are. However, the cast's classmate Hanako is just about every negative stereotype of a fat girl rolled into one; sure, her personality isn't the best (not that she's ever given the chance for CharacterDevelopment outside of a small instance of PetTheDog), but it's obvious that every scene where she's treated as the butt of the joke has to do with her appearance...and the fact that she ''doesn't'' care about how she looks, which would otherwise be a great message for a game that's so obsessed with staying true to yourself. In fact, just about every JerkAss in the game is ''also'' [[{{Gonk}} extremely unattractive]], something fans have criticized a fair amount.

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*** There's a little aside where you can stand up for a girl being picked on. If you do, you get a colorful animated musical number where you and the girl rock out to her anti-bullying song... which is kind of an amateur emo-rock hate song about how much better she is than the other kids. It doesn't help that if you ''don't'' stand up for her, she does the song anyway, and she pretty much just dances by herself in a mundane school hallway, utterly submerged in her own imagination and making everybody else kind of uncomfortable. Even before that, the other kids point out that she gets picked on ''because'' she's an outspoken braggart who pushes other kids around; in one of the classroom scenes, she actually punches another student for no apparent reason.
* ''VideoGame/Persona4'' will spend the entire game beating you over the head with how important it is to accept the truth, no matter how awful it is. This is consistent for most of the game, until you get to some of the social links. They have a tendency to backpedal on the message by presenting a personal conflict, taking steps to resolve that conflict, and then concluding it by ''not'' resolving the conflict and realizing that the thing that made them miserable the whole game is really just the thing that makes them happy. [[ValuesDissonance It also means they don't rock Japanese society's boat.]]
** [[AlphaBitch Ai Ebihara's]] backstory is that she was bullied for [[FormerlyFat being overweight as a child]], and eventually she comes to the conclusion that beauty isn't about the way you look, but the sort of person you are. However, the cast's classmate Hanako is just about every negative stereotype of a fat girl rolled into one; sure, her personality isn't the best (not that she's ever given the chance for CharacterDevelopment outside of a small instance of PetTheDog), but it's obvious that every scene where she's treated as the butt of the joke has to do with her appearance...and the fact that she ''doesn't'' care about how she looks, which would otherwise be a great message for a game that's so obsessed with staying true to yourself. In fact, just about every JerkAss in the game is ''also'' [[{{Gonk}} extremely unattractive]], something fans have criticized a fair amount.
reason.
9th Feb '17 2:40:02 PM TheNewBig
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* After the battle for Area Zero in ''VideoGame/MegaManZero 4'', Neige shoots a WhatTheHellHero speech at Zero, blaming him for all the damage caused in the fight. The anti-violence message is undercut by the fact that there's no indication that, if it wasn't for Zero, she and the other refugees wouldn't have been slaughtered. Nice job, sister. It gets worse: in her speech, the point she makes to Zero of how he and the resistance's actions are unjustifiable because they're both "fighting the same stupid war." The fact is, if they never fought, Neo Arcadia would've wiped out their entire race, save Copy X and his cronies. Hell, everything she and the other humans were doing was to survive, and what's more, even though she and the rest suffered ''less'' than the Reploids, who've barely avoided extinction, she thinks they have the right to complain about the suffering they're just now experiencing while disregarding the fact that the Reploids have no other choice. It actually manages to break the aesop that's been shown throughout the entire franchise, from [[VideoGame/MegaManClassic the original Mega Man]] choosing to fight Wily since no one else will, to the [[VideoGame/MegaManX X series]] showing how sometimes fighting is the only choice, to the heroes of [[VideoGame/MegaManZX ZX and Advent]] fighting to protect people simply because it's right. Even LighterAndSofter ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends'' showed a Mega Man fighting against pirates who were terrorizing a city as the heroic action it is. Apparently, the message from Neige's speech is "Don't ever fight to defend the innocent from certain death because things might eventually turn out bad for others".

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* After the battle for Area Zero in ''VideoGame/MegaManZero 4'', Neige shoots a WhatTheHellHero speech at Zero, blaming him for all the damage caused in the fight. The anti-violence message is undercut by the fact that there's no indication that, if it wasn't for Zero, she and the other refugees wouldn't have been slaughtered. Nice job, sister. It gets worse: in
** Worse still is
her speech, the point she makes to Zero condemnation of how he and the resistance's actions are as unjustifiable because they're both "fighting the same stupid war." The fact is, if they never fought, Neo Arcadia would've wiped out their entire race, save Copy X and his cronies. Hell, everything She should well understand what little choice they had as she and the other humans were doing was struggling to survive, and what's more, even though she and the rest suffered ''less'' than the Reploids, who've barely avoided extinction, she thinks they have the right to complain about the suffering they're just now experiencing while disregarding the fact that the survive themselves. The Reploids have had no other choice. It more choice in fighting then they did in fleeing. This speech actually manages to break the aesop that's been shown throughout the entire franchise, from [[VideoGame/MegaManClassic the original Mega Man]] choosing to fight Wily since no one else will, would, to the [[VideoGame/MegaManX X series]] showing how sometimes fighting is the only choice, to the heroes of [[VideoGame/MegaManZX ZX and Advent]] fighting to protect people simply because it's right. Even the LighterAndSofter ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends'' showed a Mega Man fighting against pirates who were terrorizing a city as the heroic action it is. Apparently, So the message moral goes from Neige's speech is "Fight for the sake of protecting people" to "Don't ever fight to defend the innocent people, even from certain death because things tragedy might eventually turn out bad for others".befall other people in the process".
4th Feb '17 7:39:10 AM ironballs16
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*** This is partially repaired in that expansion, as Garrosh's fight with Thrall has the former berating the latter for putting too much responsibility on his shoulders too quickly - Thrall grew into leadership, whereas Garrosh (from his perspective) had it thrust upon him, which ties into his original appearance in the ''Burning Crusade'' expansion, where he was crippled with self-doubt after learning [[DealWithTheDevil what his father had done]].
17th Jan '17 10:11:05 AM triscion
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** The main Aseop is supposed to be "Good intentions have consequences", and to establish why the sereies [[StarTrek Federation]] {{Expy}} adopted the [[AlienNonInterferenceClause Undeveloped Planet Preservation Pact (UP3)]]. But it got kinda muddled due to ham-fisted story telling.
16th Jan '17 8:46:05 AM Tinandel_1
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Added DiffLines:

** The actual ''narrative'' of the Fallout series does not shy away from pointing out that DrugsAreBad, as they are produced and sold almost exclusively by terrible people and used by people who are, at absolute best, 'troubled.' They also come with the risk of addiction, even for the player, and some fairly severe stat penalties. However... addiction applies ONLY these vague numeric penalties, and addictions can be removed nigh-effortlessly by certain cheap and readily available methods. So, for the player, [[DrugsAreGood drugs are awesome]] and should be used copiously for great bonuses.
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