History BrokenAesop / LiveActionTV

21st Mar '17 1:25:13 AM TywinIsGod
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** "The Parting of the Ways" has the Ninth Doctor decline from destroying Earth to destroy the Daleks, claiming that it's the morally better choice to not wipe out humanity with the Daleks. However the Daleks have just attacked Earth with such force they have distorted continents, meaning they have probably wiped out at least nearly all humanity and any survivors will soon be either killed, enslaved or turned into Daleks, which is clearly a FateWorseThanDeath, the Dalek Emperor even saying humanity will be harvested. The Doctor even points out that humanity won't be wiped out with Earth as they have spread to other worlds by now. But the Daleks surviving means they'll attack other worlds, giving humanity even less of a chance. It's only a literal DeusExMachina that saves possibly the Universe from the Daleks. Overall the Doctor's decision, considering he may well be the only non-Dalek in range of the delta wave and the Daleks are about to exterminate him anyway, looks quite odd.

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** "The Parting of the Ways" has the Ninth Doctor decline from destroying Earth to destroy the Daleks, claiming that it's the morally better choice to not wipe out humanity with the Daleks. However the Daleks have just attacked Earth with such force they have distorted continents, meaning they have probably wiped out at least nearly all humanity and any survivors will soon be either killed, enslaved or turned into Daleks, which is clearly a FateWorseThanDeath, the Dalek Emperor even saying humanity will be harvested. The Doctor even points out that humanity won't be wiped out with Earth as they have spread to other worlds by now.now, "You're the only Daleks in existence. The whole universe is in danger if I let you live". But the Daleks surviving means they'll attack other worlds, giving humanity even less of a chance. It's only a literal DeusExMachina that saves possibly the Universe from the Daleks. Overall the Doctor's decision, considering he may well be the only non-Dalek in range of the delta wave and the Daleks are about to exterminate him anyway, looks quite odd.



** The Doctor talking about how wonderful and resourceful humanity is can be slightly undermined by the fact a lot of their achievements and survival are due to him and many other aliens, the Daemons, the Osirians and the Silence to name a few. It makes you wonder -- what about other races that don't have the benefit of the Doctor helping them out?

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** The Doctor talking about how wonderful and resourceful humanity is can be slightly undermined by the fact a lot of their achievements and survival are due to him and many other aliens, the Daemons, the Osirians and the Silence to name a few. It makes you wonder -- what about other races that don't have the benefit of the Doctor helping them out?out? To be fair, in that story the Doctor may just be using the clone Doctor's supposed 'genocide' of the Daleks as a convenient excuse to put the human Doctor onto Rose and prevent her from damaging the universe through the disk-hopping.
29th Jan '17 6:16:15 PM WaggishPony
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* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': Many, ''many'' times, though the episode "Tunes" stands out as the most glaring example. In the episode, the show attempts to have an equality message about women, though in the process, the message itself becomes muddled because the show also intermixes a "rap music causes misogyny" message in the same episode. In short (for full details, see YMMV page under "Designated Hero"), 7th Heaven states that women should be equal to men, which in itself is a great message, and that hip hop shouldn't be listened because of its treatment of women. However, while an equality message would work if the episode were written better, the message becomes broken ''twice'' over because of the way female characters were written in the past, as well as its rap message. In earlier seasons, Lucy and Mary were depicted as boy crazy, and later became shrill stereotypes of female characters in later seasons (though both were exalted because they were great mothers and wives), while many career women were frequently depicted as selfish, rude, uncaring, and often in the wrong. Additionally, John Hamilton (Matt's then-roommate/friend) calls out a doctor after the latter asked him to simply put rap music on during a surgery, calling it "prejudicial" that the doctor would assume him, being black, would be all for it; Matt also states that people shouldn't listen to hip hop because it causes more ignorance about the plights of women (to be specific, he says "Ignorance is the enemy"). However, that statement becomes cracked because the whole episode is basically an excuse to rip on rap listeners, thus the show becoming prejudicial towards them, and if the writers did their homework, they would know that there are numerous ''female'' rappers (e.g. Music/MissyElliott) and tons of ''women'' who listen to rap music themselves. As a result, the writers come off as both ignorant and prejudicial towards both women and rap listeners; though in the case of women, this was likely unintentional (considering that the episode's writer was show creator Brenda Hampton).

to:

* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': Many, ''many'' times, though the episode "Tunes" stands out as the most glaring example. In the episode, the show attempts to have an a pro-woman equality message about women, message, though in the process, the message itself becomes muddled because the show also intermixes a "rap music causes misogyny" message in the same episode. In short (for full details, see YMMV page under "Designated Hero"), 7th Heaven states that women should be equal to men, which in itself is a great message, and that hip hop shouldn't be listened because of its treatment of women. However, while an equality message would work if the episode were written better, the message becomes broken ''twice'' over because of the way female characters were written in the past, as well as its rap message. In earlier seasons, Lucy and Mary were depicted as boy crazy, and later became shrill stereotypes of female characters in later seasons (though both were exalted because they were great mothers and wives), while many career women were frequently depicted as selfish, rude, uncaring, and often in the wrong. Additionally, John Hamilton (Matt's then-roommate/friend) calls out a doctor after the latter asked him to simply put rap music on during a surgery, calling it "prejudicial" that the doctor would assume him, being black, would be all for it; Matt also states that people shouldn't listen to hip hop because it causes more ignorance about the plights of women (to be specific, he says "Ignorance is the enemy"). However, that statement becomes cracked because the whole episode is basically an excuse to rip on rap listeners, thus the show becoming prejudicial towards them, and if the writers did their homework, they would know that there are numerous ''female'' rappers (e.g. Music/MissyElliott) and tons of ''women'' who listen to rap music themselves. As a result, the writers come off as both ignorant and prejudicial towards both women and rap listeners; though in the case of women, this was likely unintentional (considering that the episode's writer was show creator Brenda Hampton).
29th Jan '17 6:14:04 PM WaggishPony
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* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': Many, ''many'' times, though the episode "Tunes" stands out as the most glaring example. In the episode, the show attempts to have an equality message about women, though in the process, the message itself becomes muddled because the show also intermixes a "rap music causes misogyny" message in the same episode. In short (for full details, see YMMV page under "Designated Hero"), 7th Heaven states that women should be equal to men, which in itself is a great message, and that hip hop shouldn't be listened because of its treatment of women. However, while an equality message would work if the episode were written better, the message becomes broken twice over because of the way female characters were written in the past, as well as its rap message. In earlier seasons, Lucy and Mary were depicted as boy crazy, and later became shrill stereotypes of female characters in later seasons (though both were exalted because they were great mothers and wives), while many career women were frequently depicted as selfish, rude, uncaring, and often in the wrong. Additionally, John Hamilton (Matt's then-roommate/friend) calls out a doctor after the latter asked him to simply put rap music on during a surgery, calling it "prejudicial" that the doctor would assume him, being black, would be all for it; Matt also states that people shouldn't listen to hip hop because it causes more ignorance about the plights of women (to be specific, he says "Ignorance is the enemy"). However, that statement becomes cracked because the whole episode is basically an excuse to rip on rap listeners, thus the show becoming prejudicial towards them, and if the writers did their homework, they would know that there are numerous female rappers and tons of women who listen to rap music themselves. As a result, the writers come off as both ignorant and prejudicial towards both women and rap listeners.

to:

* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': Many, ''many'' times, though the episode "Tunes" stands out as the most glaring example. In the episode, the show attempts to have an equality message about women, though in the process, the message itself becomes muddled because the show also intermixes a "rap music causes misogyny" message in the same episode. In short (for full details, see YMMV page under "Designated Hero"), 7th Heaven states that women should be equal to men, which in itself is a great message, and that hip hop shouldn't be listened because of its treatment of women. However, while an equality message would work if the episode were written better, the message becomes broken twice ''twice'' over because of the way female characters were written in the past, as well as its rap message. In earlier seasons, Lucy and Mary were depicted as boy crazy, and later became shrill stereotypes of female characters in later seasons (though both were exalted because they were great mothers and wives), while many career women were frequently depicted as selfish, rude, uncaring, and often in the wrong. Additionally, John Hamilton (Matt's then-roommate/friend) calls out a doctor after the latter asked him to simply put rap music on during a surgery, calling it "prejudicial" that the doctor would assume him, being black, would be all for it; Matt also states that people shouldn't listen to hip hop because it causes more ignorance about the plights of women (to be specific, he says "Ignorance is the enemy"). However, that statement becomes cracked because the whole episode is basically an excuse to rip on rap listeners, thus the show becoming prejudicial towards them, and if the writers did their homework, they would know that there are numerous female ''female'' rappers (e.g. Music/MissyElliott) and tons of women ''women'' who listen to rap music themselves. As a result, the writers come off as both ignorant and prejudicial towards both women and rap listeners.listeners; though in the case of women, this was likely unintentional (considering that the episode's writer was show creator Brenda Hampton).
29th Jan '17 6:12:12 PM WaggishPony
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/SeventhHeaven'': Many, ''many'' times, though the episode "Tunes" stands out as the most glaring example. In the episode, the show attempts to have an equality message about women, though in the process, the message itself becomes muddled because the show also intermixes a "rap music causes misogyny" message in the same episode. In short (for full details, see YMMV page under "Designated Hero"), 7th Heaven states that women should be equal to men, which in itself is a great message, and that hip hop shouldn't be listened because of its treatment of women. However, while an equality message would work if the episode were written better, the message becomes broken twice over because of the way female characters were written in the past, as well as its rap message. In earlier seasons, Lucy and Mary were depicted as boy crazy, and later became shrill stereotypes of female characters in later seasons (though both were exalted because they were great mothers and wives), while many career women were frequently depicted as selfish, rude, uncaring, and often in the wrong. Additionally, John Hamilton (Matt's then-roommate/friend) calls out a doctor after the latter asked him to simply put rap music on during a surgery, calling it "prejudicial" that the doctor would assume him, being black, would be all for it; Matt also states that people shouldn't listen to hip hop because it causes more ignorance about the plights of women (to be specific, he says "Ignorance is the enemy"). However, that statement becomes cracked because the whole episode is basically an excuse to rip on rap listeners, thus the show becoming prejudicial towards them, and if the writers did their homework, they would know that there are numerous female rappers and tons of women who listen to rap music themselves. As a result, the writers come off as both ignorant and prejudicial towards both women and rap listeners.
29th Jan '17 2:38:52 PM PurpleAlert
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* One episode shares with us in great detail the importance of not judging sex workers for their jobs and valuing them as people, because sex work is work, and being paid to perform in pornographic movies does not mean that a porn actress is degraded or less worthy. The ending spits on the whole thing when the actress in question decides to become a full-time porn star, starting with group sex with a crowd of men, something she previously considered too extreme and is framed in a way to show she's going down a dark path. This is explicitly stated to be a result of her rape. In the end, the message maths out to being in porn isn't degrading in and of itself, but degradation will improve your career.

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* ** One episode shares with us in great detail the importance of not judging sex workers for their jobs and valuing them as people, because sex work is work, and being paid to perform in pornographic movies does not mean that a porn actress is degraded or less worthy. The ending spits on the whole thing when the actress in question decides to become a full-time porn star, starting with group sex with a crowd of men, something she previously considered too extreme and is framed in a way to show she's going down a dark path. This is explicitly stated to be a result of her rape. In the end, the message maths out to being in porn isn't degrading in and of itself, but degradation will improve your career.career.
** The opening lines of the intro point out that RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil, but that doesn't stop any of the squad from threatening any of its suspects with PrisonRape. Sure, for them it's just an intimidation tactic, but we see several characters who actually do get raped in prison, and those few who actually survive it end up in very bad places and bring consequences back on the squad. Olivia even gets some severe backlash for a casual PrisonRape threat being interpreted as actually conspiring to have a convict brutally assaulted. The entire premise of the show is that rape is serious and terrible, but still largely buys into the idea that PrisonRape is the icing on the karmic justice cake.
21st Jan '17 6:55:57 AM starofjusticev21
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** An episode of ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' has the Yellow Ranger (Who is Asian of course) being talked to about honor. Most notably, how she should fight monsters all on her own because it's honorable. Besides of all the other things wrong with this aesop, this episode was very closely placed to an episode about teamwork, which had literally the exact opposite aesop. And between the two, on a show where 5 super heroes usually beat up on one monster, the whole honor thing just doesn't make as much sense.

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** An episode of ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' has the Yellow Ranger (Who is Asian of course) being talked to about honor. Most notably, how she should fight monsters all on her own because it's honorable. Besides of all the other things wrong with this aesop, this episode was very closely placed to an episode about teamwork, which had literally the exact opposite aesop. And between the two, on a show where 5 super heroes usually beat up on one monster, the whole honor thing just doesn't make as much sense.
26th Dec '16 8:08:24 AM MagBas
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*** Although the intended Aesop may have been that you have to put up with [[JerkAss Jerkasses]] throughout your life, including in school, and you can't let their jerkassery stop you from pursuing important life goals. As far as what was wrong with the board of education, Jerkass teachers can, unfortunately, be TruthInTelevision.
26th Dec '16 6:38:27 AM AsForMyHandle
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** Although the intended Aesop may have been that you have to put up with [[JerkAss Jerkasses]] throughout your life, including in school, and you can't let their jerkassery stop you from pursuing important life goals. As far as what was wrong with the board of education, Jerkass teachers can, unfortunately, be TruthInTelevision.

to:

** *** Although the intended Aesop may have been that you have to put up with [[JerkAss Jerkasses]] throughout your life, including in school, and you can't let their jerkassery stop you from pursuing important life goals. As far as what was wrong with the board of education, Jerkass teachers can, unfortunately, be TruthInTelevision.



* ''Series/GilligansIsland'': According to series creator Sherwood Schwartz, the show was supposed to be about the need for us all to work together. So who ends up getting off the island? The guest stars, by betraying the regular cast.

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* ''Series/GilligansIsland'': ''Series/GilligansIsland'':
**
According to series creator Sherwood Schwartz, the show was supposed to be about the need for us all to work together. So who ends up getting off the island? The guest stars, by betraying the regular cast.



* When Hiro from ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' discovers that [[spoiler:his father had died]], he traveled back into the past to [[spoiler:save his father, but his father declined the offer]] by saying that he should not play God with his powers; then the entire episode is about Hiro learning that [[spoiler:his father]] is absolutely correct and he presents this as AnAesop [[spoiler:during his father's funeral]]. The problem is that Hiro's TimeTravel abilities are about changing the past and he had done it before without complaining once. Worse, [[spoiler:Present!Dad wouldn't have died]] if Future!Hiro hadn't traveled through time to [[spoiler:save Past!Dad from dying]] in the first place! It could be that the very Stargate-Aesop is, "Time Travel gives everyone a headache, even when it's their main ability."
** This was somewhat lampshaded when Hiro was put on trial in his own mind for playing around with causality for his own benefit.

to:

* When Hiro from ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' discovers that [[spoiler:his father had died]], he traveled back into the past to [[spoiler:save his father, but his father declined the offer]] by saying that he should not play God with his powers; then the entire episode is about Hiro learning that [[spoiler:his father]] is absolutely correct and he presents this as AnAesop [[spoiler:during his father's funeral]]. The problem is that Hiro's TimeTravel abilities are about changing the past and he had done it before without complaining once. Worse, [[spoiler:Present!Dad wouldn't have died]] if Future!Hiro hadn't traveled through time to [[spoiler:save Past!Dad from dying]] in the first place! It could be that the very Stargate-Aesop is, "Time Travel gives everyone a headache, even when it's their main ability."
**
" This was somewhat lampshaded when Hiro was put on trial in his own mind for playing around with causality for his own benefit.
26th Dec '16 6:36:58 AM AsForMyHandle
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* A later episode of ''Series/FullHouse'' had Jesse going back to school so he can get his GED. The Aesop of “stay in school, no matter what” ends up being undermined by the fact that he has to deal with the same rude teacher who was convinced that he would never amount to anything and who scared him away from his education in the first place. Oh, sure on one hand he should not have let him deter him from graduating, but on the other hand, what the hell is wrong with that board of education for allowing such an unprofessional and condescending JerkAss that has no problem humiliating others to continue teaching students? Even worse, at the end of the episode, it was ''[[StrawLoser Jesse]]'' [[StrawLoser who was completely in the wrong for not staying in the class.]] What's more, Jesse isn't exactly a loser; some of the (very successful) jobs he's had over the years have included rock star, nightclub owner, and Radio DJ, plus he's got a hot wife and is clearly doing well for himself. Not graduating clearly hasn't hurt his life in the slightest.

to:

* ''Series/FullHouse'':
**
A later episode of ''Series/FullHouse'' had Jesse going back to school so he can get his GED. The Aesop of “stay in school, no matter what” ends up being undermined by the fact that he has to deal with the same rude teacher who was convinced that he would never amount to anything and who scared him away from his education in the first place. Oh, sure on one hand he should not have let him deter him from graduating, but on the other hand, what the hell is wrong with that board of education for allowing such an unprofessional and condescending JerkAss that has no problem humiliating others to continue teaching students? Even worse, at the end of the episode, it was ''[[StrawLoser Jesse]]'' [[StrawLoser who was completely in the wrong for not staying in the class.]] What's more, Jesse isn't exactly a loser; some of the (very successful) jobs he's had over the years have included rock star, nightclub owner, and Radio DJ, plus he's got a hot wife and is clearly doing well for himself. Not graduating clearly hasn't hurt his life in the slightest.



** Popular blogger Billy Superstar of ''Full House Reviewed'' has also pointed out that many times--especially in the later seasons, when [[CreatorsPet Michelle]] became the major focus of most plots--the intended Aesops of "Sometimes things don't work out the way you want to" or "You don't always get what you want" almost ''always'' fall flat. Why? Because after Michelle (or, more rarely, Stephanie or D.J.) decides to accept the lesson, they're immediately rewarded with what they wanted in the first place. For instance, in one episode, Michelle is upset because she doesn't get to play Yankee Doodle in a school play; after she accepts her new role and encourages Derek, who's playing Yankee Doodle, to do the best he can, he makes up an entire verse of the song all about her to sing to everyone. Similarly, in "Day of the Rhino," Michelle is tricked into spending her saved-up money on what turns out to be a cheap toy given away by Rigby the Rhino, her favorite TV character. She leads a protest against his unfair tricks, which Joey praises as the right thing to do, as she may have kept other kids from making the same mistake she did...but then Rigby literally ''shows up at the Tanner'' house to give Michelle a much better toy!

to:

** Popular blogger Billy Superstar of ''Full House Reviewed'' has also pointed out that many times--especially in the later seasons, when [[CreatorsPet Michelle]] became the major focus of most plots--the intended Aesops of "Sometimes things don't work out the way you want to" or "You don't always get what you want" almost ''always'' fall flat. Why? Because after Michelle (or, more rarely, Stephanie or D.J.) decides to accept the lesson, they're immediately rewarded with what they wanted in the first place. For instance, in one episode, Michelle is upset because she doesn't get to play Yankee Doodle in a school play; after she accepts her new role and encourages Derek, who's playing Yankee Doodle, to do the best he can, he makes up an entire verse of the song all about her to sing to everyone. Similarly, in "Day of the Rhino," Michelle is tricked into spending her saved-up money on what turns out to be a cheap toy given away by Rigby the Rhino, her favorite TV character. She leads a protest against his unfair tricks, which Joey praises as the right thing to do, as she may have kept other kids from making the same mistake she did... but then Rigby literally ''shows up at the Tanner'' house to give Michelle a much better toy!toy!
** One episode had Michelle being picked on by a kid. Michelle is then told to fight back the next time, and she does. It gets her in trouble at school, and she learns that she should always go to an adult when she is picked on. The problem? The one who told her to fight back was ''[[CoolUncle Jesse]]''. Michelle ''did'' go to an adult, and it was how the situation got worse in the first place.
3rd Dec '16 4:00:01 PM Gravidef
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** Popular blogger Billy Superstar of ''Full House Reviewed'' has also pointed out that many times--especially in the later seasons, when [[CreatorsPet Michelle]] became the major focus of most plots--the intended Aesops of "Sometimes things don't work out the way you want to" or "You don't always get what you want" almost ''always'' fall flat. Why? Because after Michelle (or, more rarely, Stephanie or D.J.) decides to accept the lesson, they're immediately rewarded with what they wanted in the first place. For instance, in one episode, Michelle is upset because she doesn't get to play Yankee Doodle in a school play; after she accepts her new role and encourages Derek, who's playing Yankee Doodle, to do the best he can, he makes up an entire verse of the song all about her to sing to everyone. Similarly, in "Day of the Rhino," Michelle is tricked into spending her saved-up money on what turns out to be a cheap toy given away by Rigby the Rhino, her favorite TV character. She leads a protest against his unfair tricks, which Joey praises as the right thing to do, as she may have kept other kids from making the same mistake she did...but then Rigby literally ''shows up at the Tanner'' house to give Michelle a much better toy!



** Towards the end of Season 1, the show tried to promote a GayAesop. [[BigManOnCampus Finn]] learns to his shock from his mother that they're moving in with her boyfriend. Her boyfriend happens to be the father of [[CampGay Kurt]], who has a crush on Finn. The two have to room together, and Finn's homophobia causes tension between the two. Eventually at the end, Finn has to learn to respect others despite their differences. Sounds simple enough, but the way they go about achieving this aesop made it broken. Kurt, both in this episode and over the course of the season, '''had''' a blatant crush on Finn and the rooming situation was part of his plan to seduce Finn in hopes of him becoming his boyfriend. In other words, despite the aesop, Kurt never did respect Finn's boundaries.

to:

** Towards the end of Season 1, the show tried to promote a GayAesop. [[BigManOnCampus Finn]] learns to his shock from his mother that they're moving in with her boyfriend. Her boyfriend happens to be the father of [[CampGay Kurt]], who has a crush on Finn. The two have to room together, and Finn's homophobia causes tension between the two. Eventually at the end, Finn has to learn to respect others despite their differences. Sounds simple enough, but the way they go about achieving this aesop made it broken. Kurt, both in this episode and over the course of the season, '''had''' a blatant crush on Finn, and continued to make advances toward him despite Finn and clearly being uncomfortable with the situation; Kurt even deliberately arranged the rooming situation was part of his plan to seduce Finn in hopes of him becoming his boyfriend. In other words, despite while making the aesop, Kurt never did respect room itself look "romantic" to try to get into Finn's boundaries.pants. Thankfully, the writers realized this flawed Aesop, and had Kurt's father give his son a speech in the following season which made it clear that Kurt's behavior was completely unacceptable, and that if [[DoubleStandard Finn had been a girl and Kurt a straight guy, the latter probably would have been arrested]].



** In the Christmas episode in season 3, the club is given the choice between volunteering at a homeless shelter for the holidays and filming a christmas special. They arrive near the end and we are clearly supposed to see it as a noble heartwarming moment which ignores the fact that they filmed the special anyway and arrived later. It wouldn't be as troubling but for the way the writers obviously want this to be seen as a selfless moment on their part. The message comes across "Do the right thing but only if it doesn't cost you anything".

to:

** In the Christmas episode in season 3, the club is given the choice between volunteering at a homeless shelter for the holidays and filming a christmas Christmas special. They arrive near the end and we are clearly supposed to see it as a noble heartwarming moment which ignores the fact that they filmed the special anyway and arrived later. It wouldn't be as troubling but for the way the writers obviously want this to be seen as a selfless moment on their part. The message comes across "Do the right thing but only if it doesn't cost you anything".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BrokenAesop.LiveActionTV