History BrokenAesop / LiveActionTV

15th Jun '18 8:23:50 PM DesertDragon
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** In Season 6, Coach Beiste comes out as transgender and spends the rest of the final season transitioning into living as a man. The message was supposed to be that you're never to old to live your truth, but this completely contradicted Beiste's previous characterization as a straight woman who had a masculine appearance and interests but still wanted to be seen as a woman. In fact, Beiste was already popular with genderqueer viewers for this exact reason. Making Beiste trans arguably did more harm than help by implying that all tomboys want to be men deep down inside.

to:

** In Season 6, Coach Beiste comes out as transgender and spends the rest of the final season transitioning into living as a man. The message was supposed to be that you're never to too old to live your truth, but this completely contradicted Beiste's previous characterization as a cisgender straight woman who had a masculine appearance and interests but still wanted to be seen as a woman. In fact, Beiste was already popular with genderqueer viewers for this exact reason. Making Beiste trans arguably did more harm than help by implying that all tomboys want to be men deep down inside.
25th May '18 8:24:38 AM Rungles
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* ''Series/{{Derek}}'': This was a recurring criticism of the series as a whole, where the actions of the title character and the central cast generally often failed to honour the stated theme of “kindness is magic” i.e. social ills are best solved by determined benevolence. Verbal and occasional physical abuse was heaped on antagonists, Derek himself is often depicted as self-absorbed, petty and greedy and his constant indulgence is justified in the final episode is justified by the statement “Derek’s always right” which comes across as less a simple statement of accepted wisdom than a concession to ProtagonistCentredMorality. [[https://kindness-is-derek.tumblr.com This Tumblr feed]] began as a log of some of these tonal incosistencies although has since evolved into a repository for ironic fan art.

to:

* ''Series/{{Derek}}'': This was a recurring criticism of the series as a whole, where the actions of the title character and the central cast generally often failed to honour the stated theme of “kindness is magic” i.e. social ills are best solved by determined benevolence. Verbal Conflict was resolved by recourse to verbal and occasional physical abuse was heaped on of designated antagonists, Derek himself is often depicted as self-absorbed, petty and greedy and his constant indulgence is justified in the final episode is justified by the statement “Derek’s always right” which comes across as less a simple statement of accepted wisdom than a concession to ProtagonistCentredMorality. [[https://kindness-is-derek.tumblr.com This Tumblr feed]] began as a log of some of these tonal incosistencies although has since evolved into a repository for ironic fan art.
25th May '18 8:21:16 AM Rungles
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* ''Series/{{Derek}}'': This was a recurring criticism of the series as a whole, where the actions if the title character and the central cast generally often failed to honour the stated theme of “kindness is magic”. Verbal and occasional physical abuse was heaped on antagonists, Derek himself is often depicted as self-absorbed, petty and greedy and his constant indulgence is justified in the final episode is justified by the statement “Derek’s always right” which comes across as less a simple statement of accepted wisdom than a concession to ProtagonistCentredMorality. [[https://kindness-is-derek.tumblr.com This Tumblr feed]] began as a log of some of these tonal incosistencies although has since evolved into a repository for ironic fan art.

to:

* ''Series/{{Derek}}'': This was a recurring criticism of the series as a whole, where the actions if of the title character and the central cast generally often failed to honour the stated theme of “kindness is magic”.magic” i.e. social ills are best solved by determined benevolence. Verbal and occasional physical abuse was heaped on antagonists, Derek himself is often depicted as self-absorbed, petty and greedy and his constant indulgence is justified in the final episode is justified by the statement “Derek’s always right” which comes across as less a simple statement of accepted wisdom than a concession to ProtagonistCentredMorality. [[https://kindness-is-derek.tumblr.com This Tumblr feed]] began as a log of some of these tonal incosistencies although has since evolved into a repository for ironic fan art.
25th May '18 8:16:03 AM Rungles
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Derek}}'': This was a recurring criticism of the series as a whole, where the actions if the title character and the central cast generally often failed to honour the stated theme of “kindness is magic”. Verbal and occasional physical abuse was heaped on antagonists, Derek himself is often depicted as self-absorbed, petty and greedy and his constant indulgence is justified in the final episode is justified by the statement “Derek’s always right” which comes across as less a simple statement of accepted wisdom than a concession to ProtagonistCentredMorality. [[https://kindness-is-derek.tumblr.com This Tumblr feed]] began as a log of some of these tonal incosistencies although has since evolved into a repository for ironic fan art.
9th May '18 3:11:14 AM MrThorfan64
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** How the series handles the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler's codependent relationship. It's very apparent that the Doctor and Rose were just what each other needed in Series 1. The Doctor needed to cope with his depression and survivor's guilt so he could enjoy saving the world again, and Rose needed someone to come along and change her monotone outlook on life. But the problem with the idea of ‘needing someone’ is that that line of thought leads to really codependent places really fast, and that’s what eventually happens with the Doctor and Rose. In Series 2, the Doctor and Rose become increasingly lost in each other and their clever adventures, and increasingly detached from and uninterested in everyone around them, which numerous characters notice and become worried about. By the second half of the season, Rose comes to loathe her old life and builds so much of her new happiness around the Doctor that she can't live without him in her life. She even tries to ditch all of her friends and family in an alternate universe forever so she won't have to say goodbye to him. The denouement of "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Army Of Ghosts]] / [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E13Doomsday Doomsday]]", in which the Doctor and Rose are forcibly separated and Rose in particular is absolutely devastated, appears to be a cautionary tale about why you shouldn’t make one person the center of your world, because it will only lead to your heart being broken (hints of this were seeded back in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E3SchoolReunion School Reunion]]", when Rose realized that while the Doctor might be the center of her world, he's lived far longer than her and she will never be the center of his). But if that’s the case, then Rose’s return in Series 4 is positively baffling. In “[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E12TheStolenEarth The Stolen Earth]] / [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey’s End]]”, we learn Rose has not even tried to move on, she’s spent the last few years trying to think of ways to get back to the Doctor (remember that time moves faster in Pete’s world, so it’s been a good long while since “Doomsday”), and when the Daleks almost destroy the universe Rose leaps at the chance to jump universes so she can try to find the Doctor. She’s rewarded with a clone Doctor that can grow old for the rest of his life with her, and in a deleted scene she was going to receive a TARDIS so they can go traveling again. So that Rose can receive a happy ending, the lesson of her arc is changed from 'beware unhealthy, codependent relationships' to 'if you cling to someone hard enough, and never ever let go, eventually you’ll get everything you ever wanted and more'.

to:

** How the series handles the Tenth Doctor and Rose Tyler's codependent relationship. It's very apparent that the Doctor and Rose were just what each other needed in Series 1. The Doctor needed to cope with his depression and survivor's guilt so he could enjoy saving the world again, and Rose needed someone to come along and change her monotone outlook on life. But the problem with the idea of ‘needing someone’ is that that line of thought leads to really codependent places really fast, and that’s what eventually happens with the Doctor and Rose. In Series 2, the Doctor and Rose become increasingly lost in each other and their clever adventures, and increasingly detached from and uninterested in everyone around them, which numerous characters notice and become worried about. By the second half of the season, Rose comes to loathe her old life and builds so much of her new happiness around the Doctor that she can't live without him in her life. She even tries to ditch all of her friends and family in an alternate universe forever so she won't have to say goodbye to him. The denouement of "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Army Of Ghosts]] / [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E13Doomsday Doomsday]]", in which the Doctor and Rose are forcibly separated and Rose in particular is absolutely devastated, appears to be a cautionary tale about why you shouldn’t make one person the center of your world, because it will only lead to your heart being broken (hints of this were seeded back in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E3SchoolReunion School Reunion]]", when Rose realized that while the Doctor might be the center of her world, he's lived far longer than her and she will never be the center of his). But if that’s the case, then Rose’s return in Series 4 is positively baffling. In “[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E12TheStolenEarth The Stolen Earth]] / [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey’s End]]”, we learn Rose has not even tried to move on, she’s spent the last few years trying to think of ways to get back to the Doctor (remember that time moves faster in Pete’s world, so it’s been a good long while since “Doomsday”), and when the Daleks almost destroy the universe Rose leaps at the chance to jump universes so she can try to find the Doctor. Not only that but her dialogue implies she was trying to travel between universes beforehand even though the Doctor said travelling between universes again would destroy both worlds, meaning Rose risked two worlds just for her happiness. She’s rewarded with a clone Doctor that can grow old for the rest of his life with her, and in a deleted scene she was going to receive a TARDIS so they can go traveling again. So that Rose can receive a happy ending, the lesson of her arc is changed from 'beware unhealthy, codependent relationships' to 'if you cling to someone hard enough, and never ever let go, eventually you’ll get everything you ever wanted and more'.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]" is yet another and even worse example of the series trying to suggest that the Doctor's attitude to the Daleks is FantasticRacism while still depicting them as AlwaysChaoticEvil. The Doctor treats his clone as wrong for wiping out the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity they're back next series]]), saying it shows how violent and brutal he is. Yet the Daleks had just come very close to wiping out entire Universes and are fictions poster creature for ScaryDogmaticAliens. The Doctor had temporarily incapacitated them but considering how resourceful they are it was unlikely they would have remained like that for long. The moral makes even less sense considering that 10 in the same series had basically done the same thing to a race that wasn't as dangerous as the Daleks and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, even if this was what history decreed. Meanwhile his clone was only wiping out the Daleks and ([[JokerImmunity possibly]]) their OmnicidalManiac Creator Davros, who refused a chance to be saved by the Doctor. Not only that but when the Doctor declined a chance to destroy the last Dalek in their previous appearance, claiming there has been too much death today, that Dalek had escaped and caused the problems of this episode. Not only that but that Dalek had been responsible for most of the deaths, killing the Dalek-Humans that numbered over a thousand because they were not Dalek enough. To be fair, the Doctor may just be using the clone Doctor's supposed 'genocide' of the Daleks as a convenient excuse to put the human Doctor onto Rose and prevent her from damaging the universe through the disk-hopping.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]" is yet another and even worse example of the series trying to suggest that the Doctor's attitude to the Daleks is FantasticRacism while still depicting them as AlwaysChaoticEvil. The Doctor treats his clone as wrong for wiping out the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity they're back next series]]), saying it shows how violent and brutal he is. Yet the Daleks had just come very close to wiping out entire Universes and are fictions poster creature for ScaryDogmaticAliens. The Doctor had temporarily incapacitated them but considering how resourceful they are it was unlikely they would have remained like that for long. The moral makes even less sense considering that 10 in the same series had basically done the same thing to a race that wasn't as dangerous as the Daleks and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, even if this was what history decreed. Meanwhile his clone was only wiping out the Daleks and ([[JokerImmunity possibly]]) their OmnicidalManiac Creator Davros, Davros (who is later revealed to have survived), who refused a chance to be saved by the Doctor. Not only that but when the Doctor declined a chance to destroy the last Dalek in their previous appearance, claiming there has been too much death today, that Dalek had escaped and caused the problems of this episode. Not only that but that Dalek had been responsible for most of the deaths, killing the Dalek-Humans that numbered over a thousand because they were not Dalek enough. To be fair, the Doctor may just be using the clone Doctor's supposed 'genocide' of the Daleks as a convenient excuse to put the human Doctor onto Rose and prevent her from damaging the universe through the disk-hopping. Though that leads to further problems (see above).
30th Apr '18 10:41:13 AM Ulkomaalainen
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* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
** Because of course the episode "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS06E23ProfitAndLace Profit and Lace]]" didn't have enough problems, it had to undercut not just one, but two different morals! First was the lesson about female equality, carried out through a display by a sex-changed Quark that was agonizingly sexist ''even after'' Armin Shimerman insisted the script be toned down to be less misogynistic. Then came everything dealing with Quark's relationship with his mother, where the effects of their mutual loathing for each other is portrayed as entirely his fault; sadly for its attempt to portray Quark as in the wrong and badly in need of a lesson, Ishka consistently treats him like shit throughout the episode, either ignoring or forgetting the time Quark risked his own life to save her from the Dominion, even ''after'' he undergoes extensive surgery, flirts with another man, endures Zek hitting on him and pisses off the Acting Grand Nagus in order to bring about a social change ''he doesn't even want'' in order to help Ishka get the reform she was pushing for.
** In Website/SFDebris's review of [=DS9=]'s "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS07E15BaddaBingBaddaBang Badda-Bing, Badda-Bang]]", Chuck notes how Sisko complains about the racism present during the time period of the holodeck program (the 1960s), but says nothing about the sexism also present in that time, made worse by how the team's BatmanGambit uses its three female members in mostly passive roles (e.g. DistractedByTheSexy), rather than taking a fully active part in the casino heist like the men. As Chuck put it:
-->'''Chuck:''' In their attempt to address the elephant in the room, they've unwittingly called attention to the mammoth standing next to it.
* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'':
** {{Deconstructed}} with T'Pol's P'nar syndrome. The Vulcan Mind-Meld subculture and related P'nar syndrome disease served as allegories for homosexuality and AIDS, including the scorn heaped upon the former and the stigma attached to contracting the latter. Archer and Phlox repeatedly expressed their distaste for the Vulcan bigotry related to this issue, but they themselves continually point out that T'Pol, who has P'nar Syndrome, is not a member of the Mind-Meld minority, and attracted the disease through a non-consensual attack. T'Pol eventually pointed out to them that, by attempting to "excuse" her having the disease, they are supporting and even justifying the DoubleStandard that the High Command has against the Mind-Meld minority.
** A straight broken aesop in "The Hatchery". A major theme of the Xindi arc is that humans and Xindi are NotSoDifferent; Archer has met several who are decent people that are either horrified to learn that they're involved in the deaths of millions or hold ''serious'' reservations about destroying Earth. When the crew finds an Insectoid ship with a hatchery, they conclude that the crew pulled a HeroicSacrifice to save the eggs. But Archer's comparison of insect eggs to humanoid babies and attempts to save the hatchery are portrayed as irrational, the crew has to mutiny, and the only reason he cared was because he got hit with egg gunk. So our enemies are people too... unless they're ''bugs,'' 'cause that's just weird. (It also nicely undercuts a general theme of Star Trek: even if life comes in an unfamiliar or creepy form, it deserves respect.)



* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'':
** {{Deconstructed}} with T'Pol's P'nar syndrome. The Vulcan Mind-Meld subculture and related P'nar syndrome disease served as allegories for homosexuality and AIDS, including the scorn heaped upon the former and the stigma attached to contracting the latter. Archer and Phlox repeatedly expressed their distaste for the Vulcan bigotry related to this issue, but they themselves continually point out that T'Pol, who has P'nar Syndrome, is not a member of the Mind-Meld minority, and attracted the disease through a non-consensual attack. T'Pol eventually pointed out to them that, by attempting to "excuse" her having the disease, they are supporting and even justifying the DoubleStandard that the High Command has against the Mind-Meld minority.
** A straight broken aesop in "The Hatchery". A major theme of the Xindi arc is that humans and Xindi are NotSoDifferent; Archer has met several who are decent people that are either horrified to learn that they're involved in the deaths of millions or hold ''serious'' reservations about destroying Earth. When the crew finds an Insectoid ship with a hatchery, they conclude that the crew pulled a HeroicSacrifice to save the eggs. But Archer's comparison of insect eggs to humanoid babies and attempts to save the hatchery are portrayed as irrational, the crew has to mutiny, and the only reason he cared was because he got hit with egg gunk. So our enemies are people too... unless they're ''bugs,'' 'cause that's just weird. (It also nicely undercuts a general theme of Star Trek: even if life comes in an unfamiliar or creepy form, it deserves respect.)
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
** Because of course the episode "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS06E23ProfitAndLace Profit and Lace]]" didn't have enough problems, it had to undercut not just one, but two different morals! First was the lesson about female equality, carried out through a display by a sex-changed Quark that was agonizingly sexist ''even after'' Armin Shimerman insisted the script be toned down to be less misogynistic. Then came everything dealing with Quark's relationship with his mother, where the effects of their mutual loathing for each other is portrayed as entirely his fault; sadly for its attempt to portray Quark as in the wrong and badly in need of a lesson, Ishka consistently treats him like shit throughout the episode, either ignoring or forgetting the time Quark risked his own life to save her from the Dominion, even ''after'' he undergoes extensive surgery, flirts with another man, endures Zek hitting on him and pisses off the Acting Grand Nagus in order to bring about a social change ''he doesn't even want'' in order to help Ishka get the reform she was pushing for.
** In Website/SFDebris's review of [=DS9=]'s "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS07E15BaddaBingBaddaBang Badda-Bing, Badda-Bang]]", Chuck notes how Sisko complains about the racism present during the time period of the holodeck program (the 1960s), but says nothing about the sexism also present in that time, made worse by how the team's BatmanGambit uses its three female members in mostly passive roles (e.g. DistractedByTheSexy), rather than taking a fully active part in the casino heist like the men. As Chuck put it:
-->'''Chuck:''' In their attempt to address the elephant in the room, they've unwittingly called attention to the mammoth standing next to it.



* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3b8mYFPlSR8&list=PLA1CF4B0F7FB2FE18 Totally Minnie]] is a Creator/{{Disney}} special from the [[TheEighties 80s]] about a guy that goes to a place run by Minnie Mouse that teaches people how to be [[TotallyRadical "totally hip"]] to pick up girls. She and her human assistant teach him how to dress, converse, and other things related. What's the ending message? [[BeYourself "Just be yourself."]] Huh?



* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3b8mYFPlSR8&list=PLA1CF4B0F7FB2FE18 Totally Minnie]] is a Creator/{{Disney}} special from the [[TheEighties 80s]] about a guy that goes to a place run by Minnie Mouse that teaches people how to be [[TotallyRadical "totally hip"]] to pick up girls. She and her human assistant teach him how to dress, converse, and other things related. What's the ending message? [[BeYourself "Just be yourself."]] Huh?



* ''Series/TheVampireDiaries'' seems to be making a powerful statement about how unhealthy Stefan and Damon's relationship is, and how bad codependent relationships are in general this season. Everyone keeps telling Damon that Stefan is always suffering due to his selfish behaviour. While that is true, [[spoiler: the problem is that Stefan seems to be the one causing his own problems. First off, his blood feud with Julian, which he kept on pushing with Valerie's help, resulted in his mother's death and Damon being trapped in the phoenix stone. Then, when Damon had a nervous breakdown, he was willing to help, to stop when Damon revealed that he thought he had killed Elena (Enzo led him to believe that). Most recently, Stefan willingly went to Damon for help with Rayna, the vampire hunter, only to complain and fear that Damon would let him down. But, the reason he went to Damon in the first place was because Rayna was released by MATT, who is very angry with Stefan for something that happened during the three years that Damon was asleep that resulted in Matt's girlfriend's death. Maybe the moral is intended to be that "there are just some people you need to let go of", but it's coming off more like "if you have a problem, find an emotional punching bag and blame all of your troubles on that person instead."]]



* ''Series/TheVampireDiaries'' seems to be making a powerful statement about how unhealthy Stefan and Damon's relationship is, and how bad codependent relationships are in general this season. Everyone keeps telling Damon that Stefan is always suffering due to his selfish behaviour. While that is true, [[spoiler: the problem is that Stefan seems to be the one causing his own problems. First off, his blood feud with Julian, which he kept on pushing with Valerie's help, resulted in his mother's death and Damon being trapped in the phoenix stone. Then, when Damon had a nervous breakdown, he was willing to help, to stop when Damon revealed that he thought he had killed Elena (Enzo led him to believe that). Most recently, Stefan willingly went to Damon for help with Rayna, the vampire hunter, only to complain and fear that Damon would let him down. But, the reason he went to Damon in the first place was because Rayna was released by MATT, who is very angry with Stefan for something that happened during the three years that Damon was asleep that resulted in Matt's girlfriend's death. Maybe the moral is intended to be that "there are just some people you need to let go of", but it's coming off more like "if you have a problem, find an emotional punching bag and blame all of your troubles on that person instead."]]
30th Apr '18 10:35:16 AM Ulkomaalainen
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** In "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E4TheOutrageousOkona The Outrageous Okana]]," Data's entire subplot is similar to the above one from ''Power Rangers Megaforce,'' where he attempts to learn the basics of comedy and not automatically analyze jokes he's told in an aesop of trying to just enjoy humor. Not only does he go about learning about comedy the wrong way for the kind of humor he wasn't getting (learning from a computer simulation of a 20th-century comedian on the holodeck in a recreation of a comedy club from the same era), but the holographic comedian is played by Joe Piscopo; [[UnderminedByReality a comedian whose career didn't survive too long passed the episode's airing.]] Not only that, but the jokes in the episode are either bad because of their deliveries, or are so obtuse and forced (the majority of them ''were'' made up on set, and not just from Joe deciding he could come up with better material frm what was in the script either) to the point that a wordplay joke needs subtitles to understand as it's told because of the delivery before it's explained in the show, that no one in the audience would be laughing at them either, making Data justified in not laughing at them outside of his lacking emotions. Not only that, but with how Brent Spiner was copying Joe during an impression of Jerry Lewis, as SF Debris said, he was making fun of Joe, making Data look like he's faking not understanding at least ''some'' types of humor. Not only that, but the deadpan way Data reacts to the jokes he's told are also decently funny unintentionally.

to:

** In "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E4TheOutrageousOkona The Outrageous Okana]]," Data's entire subplot is similar to the above one from ''Power Rangers Megaforce,'' where he attempts to learn the basics of comedy and not automatically analyze jokes he's told in an aesop of trying to just enjoy humor. Not only does he go about learning about comedy the wrong way for the kind of humor he wasn't getting (learning from a computer simulation of a 20th-century comedian on the holodeck in a recreation of a comedy club from the same era), but the holographic comedian is played by Joe Piscopo; [[UnderminedByReality a comedian whose career didn't survive too long passed past the episode's airing.]] Not only that, but the jokes in the episode are either bad because of their deliveries, or are so obtuse and forced (the majority of them ''were'' made up on set, and not just from Joe deciding he could come up with better material frm what was in the script either) to the point that a wordplay joke needs subtitles to understand as it's told because of the delivery before it's explained in the show, that no one in the audience would be laughing at them either, making Data justified in not laughing at them outside of his lacking emotions. Not only that, but with how Brent Spiner was copying Joe during an impression of Jerry Lewis, as SF Debris said, he was making fun of Joe, making Data look like he's faking not understanding at least ''some'' types of humor. Not only that, but the deadpan way Data reacts to the jokes he's told are also decently funny unintentionally.
30th Apr '18 10:33:03 AM Ulkomaalainen
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* Sophia in ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'' often waxes into BrokenAesop reminiscences.
--> '''Sophia:''' Picture it: Sicily, 1922...
** Rose was also an expert at BrokenAesop stories, mostly because she was TheDitz.

to:

* Sophia in ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'' often waxes into BrokenAesop reminiscences.
--> '''Sophia:''' Picture it: Sicily, 1922...
** Rose was also an expert at BrokenAesop stories, mostly because she was TheDitz.
''Series/TheGoldenGirls''
24th Apr '18 5:47:34 PM dbdude01
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Added DiffLines:

** The episode "Gray" started with a college girl accusing a male classmate of raping her while she was drunk, the man said she consented and didn't remember the next day because she was drunk. This gave Olivia the opportunity to lecture the squad that if a woman has been drinking, it's rape (one might think that a sex crimes detective [[CluelessAesop would know the legal definition of rape]]) and that if a man is equally drunk [[DoubleStandard it's still the man's responsibility not to take advantage of her]]. The episode was set up to be an episode-long AuthorTract about drunken he-said-she-said rape cases, but then the investigation went on a tangent, it turned out that the man got his girlfriend pregnant and then caused her to have a miscarriage by using an abortive agent as a sexual lubricant. When the case went to trial, the defense attorney asked the judge to recuse herself because of her bias involving cases with "this type of victim". The judge then went to the reluctant witness victim to [[AuthorFilibuster tell her own story]] about how she was raped and no one took her seriously. This speech might have been perfectly in place in many other episodes of the series, it might have even made sense to have the judge give this speech to the first victim who accused the man of rape, but by this point in the story everyone had forgotten about her. The victim the judge gave the speech to wasn't raped, in fact she was the one girl everyone knew for certain had consensual sex with the perpetrator. So the judge had no reason to recuse herself, her speech to the victim was weirdly out of place, and the perpetrator was never punished for anything he did to the first victim, and even though the episode was supposed to teach the importance of believing women who say they were raped, they never really proved that the original accusation was true.
15th Apr '18 2:49:27 AM Scsigs
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** In "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E4TheOutrageousOkona The Outrageous Okana]]," Data's entire subplot is similar to the above one from ''Power Rangers Megaforce,'' where he attempts to learn the basics of comedy and not automatically analyze jokes he's told in an aesop of trying to just enjoy humor. Not only does he go about learning about comedy the wrong way for the kind of humor he wasn't getting (learning from a computer simulation of a 20th-century comedian on the holodeck in a recreation of a comedy club from the same era), but the holographic comedian is played by Joe Piscopo; [[UnderminedByReality a comedian whose career didn't survive too long passed the episode's airing.]] Not only that, but the jokes in the episode are either bad because of their deliveries, or are so obtuse and forced (the majority of them ''were'' made up on set, and not just from Joe deciding he could come up with better material frm what was in the script either) to the point that a wordplay joke needs subtitles to understand as it's told because of the delivery before it's explained in the show, that no one in the audience would be laughing at them either, making Data justified in not laughing at them outside of his lacking emotions. Not only that, but with how Brent Spiner was copying Joe during an impression of Jerry Lewis, as SF Debris said, he was making fun of Joe, making Data look like he's faking not understanding at least ''some'' types of humor.

to:

** In "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E4TheOutrageousOkona The Outrageous Okana]]," Data's entire subplot is similar to the above one from ''Power Rangers Megaforce,'' where he attempts to learn the basics of comedy and not automatically analyze jokes he's told in an aesop of trying to just enjoy humor. Not only does he go about learning about comedy the wrong way for the kind of humor he wasn't getting (learning from a computer simulation of a 20th-century comedian on the holodeck in a recreation of a comedy club from the same era), but the holographic comedian is played by Joe Piscopo; [[UnderminedByReality a comedian whose career didn't survive too long passed the episode's airing.]] Not only that, but the jokes in the episode are either bad because of their deliveries, or are so obtuse and forced (the majority of them ''were'' made up on set, and not just from Joe deciding he could come up with better material frm what was in the script either) to the point that a wordplay joke needs subtitles to understand as it's told because of the delivery before it's explained in the show, that no one in the audience would be laughing at them either, making Data justified in not laughing at them outside of his lacking emotions. Not only that, but with how Brent Spiner was copying Joe during an impression of Jerry Lewis, as SF Debris said, he was making fun of Joe, making Data look like he's faking not understanding at least ''some'' types of humor. Not only that, but the deadpan way Data reacts to the jokes he's told are also decently funny unintentionally.
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