History BrokenAesop / LiveActionTV

25th Jul '16 12:49:06 PM pinkdalek
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** "The Face of Evil" is based on the premise that the Doctor's egotistical attempts to save a space mission AI (by simply imposing a print of his own brain over it instead of actually fixing the problem) led to the AI becoming an insane God who selectively breeds the settlers into opposing CargoCult factions that worship him, and creating a dystopic {{Egopolis}} based on the Doctor's image. It all seems like it's set up to criticise the Doctor's big ego and ChronicHeroSyndrome... but it ends with the AI, having realised who it is, asking the Doctor for an explanation as to where he went wrong, absolving the Doctor of all responsibility and even having 'God' ask him for tips on how to be better. Striking because the new series absolutely would ''never'' have missed the opportunity to criticise the Doctor's god complex.
16th Jul '16 6:20:49 AM MagBas
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* While ''Series/OneTreeHill'' was usually full of [[BrokenAesop broken]] or [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop family unfriendly]] aesops, one particular episode/storyline sticks out. Nathan finally was sick of his mother Deb's alcoholism, [[NeverMyFault lack of any responsibility for her actions]] and overall {{Jerkass}} behavior, especially towards his wife Haley and he decides to confront her about it. However, what should have been a great moment of him [[CallingTheOldManOut calling the old woman out]] was destroyed by him, who after she admitted that she had a disease, he dismisses this and reminds her that Peyton's [[spoiler: biological]] mother, Ellie, died of a ''[[UnfortunateImplications real]]'' [[UnfortunateImplications disease, cancer]]. Even if he was ultimately trying to get her admit she had a problem, take control of her life and get help, whose bright idea was it to imply that alcoholism is just a weak excuse to be an asshole instead of a legitimate disease?
8th Jul '16 2:54:51 AM MGD107
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** "The Daleks" was justified under the show's then {{Edutainment}} premise because it was conceived as anti-war and anti-racism, since the Thals made Skaro virtually uninhabitable through detonating a nuclear device to kill the Dal race, reducing their civilisation to sticks and stones and forcing the remaining Dals to adopt [[LittleGreenManInACan robotic shells]] to survive (making them paranoid and racist regarding outsiders). However, the solution turns out to be Ian making the pacifist Thal civilisation on Skaro go to war with the Daleks to [[GuiltFreeExterminationWar commit genocide against the race]] so they can take all their resources. This is not treated as DirtyBusiness or DarkerAndEdgier or as anything other than a happy ending. It also might have helped if the Thals hadn't been portrayed as tall, uniformly blond Aryan supermen and described as 'perfect'.
26th Jun '16 9:39:56 AM RobTan
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** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite it's pro-tolerance and inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged, for instance a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she will eventually cheat on her with a man, and is never called out for it.

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** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite it's pro-tolerance and inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged, for instance a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she will would have eventually cheat on her cheated with a man, and is never called out for it.
26th Jun '16 9:38:41 AM RobTan
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** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite it's pro-tolerance and inclusivity message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles. It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged.

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** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite it's pro-tolerance and inclusivity inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles. roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged.unchallenged, for instance a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she will eventually cheat on her with a man, and is never called out for it.
23rd Jun '16 8:45:05 AM RobTan
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** In ''[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGeneratioS5E16Ethics Ethics]]'', Worf suffers an injury that leaves him quadriplegic, and, rather than take the standard treatment of implants which would restore most of his mobility, he opts for a risky, unproven spinal surgery performed by a visiting doctor who has a reputation for cutting corners in her research. The operation is a success, although Worf does end up clinically dead for a few minutes during the procedure. Crusher tears into the doctor for using Worf as a guinea pig to prove a pet theory, but this is undercut since: A. it worked perfectly and Worf makes a complete recovery, and B. performing risky procedures based on the scantest evidence is basically a Starfleet doctor's job description, and every CMO in Star Trek, including Crusher, has done much more serious operations on organisms they knew even less about.

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** In ''[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGeneratioS5E16Ethics Ethics]]'', "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E16Ethics Ethics]]", Worf suffers an injury that leaves him quadriplegic, and, rather than take the standard treatment of implants which would restore most of his mobility, he opts for a risky, unproven spinal surgery performed by a visiting doctor who has a reputation for cutting corners in her research. The operation is a success, although Worf does end up clinically dead for a few minutes during the procedure. Crusher tears into the doctor for using Worf as a guinea pig to prove a pet theory, but this is undercut since: A. it worked perfectly and Worf makes a complete recovery, and B. performing risky procedures based on the scantest evidence is basically a Starfleet doctor's job description, and every CMO in Star Trek, including Crusher, has done much more serious operations on organisms they knew even less about.
5th Jun '16 8:26:34 PM Peridonyx
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** The ending of "Guilt" would have you believe that Cabot's practically crossed the MoralEventHorizon by using a fake search warrant to stop the BigBad once and for all. Despite the facts that all of her clean attempts to stop him have utterly failed, he's an unrepentant and unwilling-to-stop pedophile, she still goes out of her way to shift the blame for the fake warrant all toward herself and away from her colleagues, and she's definitely not the type to convict someone innocent just to wrap things up. While she definitely enters gray territory here, she comes across as much more of a DesignatedVillain and/or PragmaticHero than the AmoralAttorney and/or KnightTemplar that her superiors won't seem to stop villifying her as.

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** The ending of "Guilt" would have you believe that Cabot's practically crossed the MoralEventHorizon by using a fake search warrant to stop the BigBad once and for all. Despite the facts that all of her clean attempts to stop him have utterly failed, he's an unrepentant and unwilling-to-stop pedophile, she still goes out of her way to shift the blame for the fake warrant all toward herself and away from her colleagues, and she's definitely not the type to convict someone innocent just to wrap things up. While she definitely enters gray territory here, she comes across as much more of a DesignatedVillain and/or PragmaticHero than the AmoralAttorney and/or KnightTemplar that her superiors won't seem to stop villifying vilifying her as.
13th May '16 12:21:10 PM NNinja
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* In ''Series/TheFlash2014'' season two SuperSerum Velocity 9 gives that temporary SuperSpeed or improves it if one already has it is used as stand-in for performance-enchancing drugs in sports. At one point Barry is tempted to use V9 to level the playing field against evil speedster but is discouraged from it by Dr Wells. Message is pretty clear, but earlier in the series Jay Garrick was ''encouraged'' to use Velocity and 3 out of 4 times he used it he ended up saving the day thanks to it. Bonus points for Wells saying "Be like Jay" when discouraging Barry from doing [[{{Irony}} exacly what Jay did]].
13th May '16 12:04:58 PM NNinja
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** Also in season 1, Puck wants to be recognized as the father of Quinn's baby. Mercedes gives him a stern talking-to, saying Quinn has already chosen the man she wants to be her baby's father, and it's Finn. Who doesn't know it isn't his and has been led to believe that the baby is his responsibility whether he wants it or not. And doesn't know that Quinn cheated on him with his best friend. Yep, the decision is all Quinn's.

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** %%** Also in season 1, Puck wants to be recognized as the father of Quinn's baby. Mercedes gives him a stern talking-to, saying Quinn has already chosen the man she wants to be her baby's father, and it's Finn. Who doesn't know it isn't his and has been led to believe that the baby is his responsibility whether he wants it or not. And doesn't know that Quinn cheated on him with his best friend. Yep, the decision is all Quinn's.
11th May '16 1:42:01 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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*** There's some justification of this in that Sophia has had a stroke which removed her ability to censor her speech (however, they don't mention that in the episode at all, which would have prevented some of the cracks in the Aesop), while Rose is more naive than malicious (her only comment is "We weren't expecting you to be so fat," which is certainly rude, but not deliberately mean). But Blanche literally pulling her daughter away from the kitchen (where the cheesecake is waiting) still stings--as does the fact that the producers later recast Rebecca as a conventionally thin woman, with no reference to her previous weight struggles at all.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BrokenAesop.LiveActionTV