History BrokenAesop / LiveActionTV

24th Sep '16 9:44:01 AM nmn3r3
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** "The Doctor's Daughter" is one of those anti-violence, anti-gun, and anti-murder stories. The problem is, it calls the Doctor "the man who never would". And while refraining from shooting the man who'd killed Jenny is admirable, the "never would" part is only true when applied to firing the gun-- violence and cold-blooded murder are things the audience already knows the Doctor is capable of, and will continue to be.
22nd Sep '16 11:52:06 AM Alvin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The two-parters story "The Rebel Flesh/ The Almost People" is about a rebellion of clones who are [[CloningBlues sick of being treated as disposable vessels]] by miners to operate in dangerous circumstances. The Doctor even sides with them saying ClonesArePeopleToo and try his best to save them. At the end of the day, the Doctor reveals to his companions the reason of their visit to the factory: [[TomatoInTheMirror Amy has been replaced with a clone all along]]. The Doctor ''immediatly '' [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman kills Amy's clone]] with his sonic screwdriver as if nothing in the last few hours ever happened. The problem is lessened a bit in that Amy's clone appeared to just be remotely controlled by the real Amy, but it's still a matter of how sure was the Doctor that it hadn't been gaining sentience like the others.

to:

** The two-parters story "The Rebel Flesh/ The Almost People" is about a rebellion of clones who are [[CloningBlues sick of being treated as disposable vessels]] by miners to operate in dangerous circumstances. The Doctor even sides with them saying ClonesArePeopleToo and try his best to save them. At the end of the day, the Doctor reveals to his companions the reason of their visit to the factory: [[TomatoInTheMirror Amy has been replaced with a clone all along]]. The Doctor ''immediatly ''immediately '' [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman kills Amy's clone]] with his sonic screwdriver as if nothing in the last few hours ever happened. The problem is lessened a bit in that Amy's clone appeared to just be remotely controlled by the real Amy, but it's still a matter of how sure was the Doctor that it hadn't been gaining sentience like the others.
6th Sep '16 12:58:48 AM RobTan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite it's pro-tolerance and inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged, for instance a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she would have eventually cheated with a man, and is never called out for it.

to:

** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite it's pro-tolerance and inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged, for instance a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she would have eventually cheated with a man, and is never called out for it.it, and a transwoman forced to dress as a man on school property is basically told to suck it up.
3rd Sep '16 4:02:20 PM PhoenixAvalon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One episode shares with us in great detail the importance of not judging sex workers for their jobs and valuing them as people, because sex work is work, and being paid to perform in pornographic movies does not mean that a porn actress is degraded or less worthy. The ending spits on the whole thing when the actress in question decides to become a full-time porn star, starting with group sex with a whole crowd of men... because being in porn led to her being degraded and humiliated, so she might as well consent to being exploited for money.
26th Aug '16 7:18:53 PM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In an episode of ''Series/TheEqualizer'', eponymous character Robert [=McCall=], whose client has been shot, delivers a blistering screed against private ownership of firearms. He's standing in his private arsenal at the time. (Satisfyingly, sidekick [[DeadpanSnarker Mickey Kostmayer]] points this out.)

to:

* In an episode of ''Series/TheEqualizer'', eponymous character Robert [=McCall=], whose client has been shot, delivers a blistering screed against private ownership of firearms. He's standing in his private (and illegal) arsenal at the time. (Satisfyingly, sidekick [[DeadpanSnarker Mickey Kostmayer]] points this out.)
26th Aug '16 12:49:32 PM Sapphirea2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Doctor talking about how wonderful and resourceful humanity is can be slightly undermined by the fact a lot of their achievements and survival are due to him and many other aliens, the Daemons, the Osirians and the Silents to name a few. It makes you wonder what about other races that don't have the benefit of the Doctor helping them out.

to:

** The Doctor talking about how wonderful and resourceful humanity is can be slightly undermined by the fact a lot of their achievements and survival are due to him and many other aliens, the Daemons, the Osirians and the Silents Silence to name a few. It makes you wonder -- what about other races that don't have the benefit of the Doctor helping them out.out?
16th Aug '16 6:23:16 PM abby-anne
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'': In “Kimmy Gives Up!” Jacqueline puts Buckley on a new medication, Dyziplen, which makes him quiet, emotionless, and obedient. By the end of the episode, Jaqueline learns that medication is no substitute for parenting and never gives it to him again. Except the episode repeatedly demonstrates that Buckley is [[EnfantTerrible far more destructive and violent than most children his age]] and previous episodes even imply that he is [[TheSociopath a psychopath in the making.]] So while Dyziplen is wrong for Buckley, the idea of medicating him is not.

to:

* ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'': In “Kimmy Gives Up!” one episode of ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'', Jacqueline puts Buckley on a new medication, Dyziplen, which makes him quiet, emotionless, and obedient. By the end of the episode, Jaqueline learns that medication is no substitute for parenting and never gives it to him again. Except the episode repeatedly demonstrates that Buckley is [[EnfantTerrible far more destructive and violent than most children his age]] and previous episodes even imply that he is [[TheSociopath a psychopath in the making.]] So while Dyziplen is wrong for Buckley, the idea of medicating him is not.
16th Aug '16 6:22:08 PM abby-anne
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'': In “Kimmy Gives Up!” Jacqueline puts Buckley on a new medication, Dyziplen, which makes him quiet, emotionless, and obedient. By the end of the episode, Jaqueline learns that medication is no substitute for parenting and never gives it to him again. Except the episode repeatedly demonstrates that Buckley is [[EnfantTerrible far more destructive and violent than most children his age]] and previous episodes even imply that he is [[TheSociopath a psychopath in the making.]] So while Dyziplen is wrong for Buckley, the idea of medicating him is not.
11th Aug '16 1:30:58 PM jackrabbit7617
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/That70sShow'': The episode "Love, Wisconsin Style" focuses primarily on {{jerkass}} Casey Kelso breaking up with Donna. Donna then attempted to get back together with Eric, but Eric rejected her because he felt like her "backup". Red and Kitty then proceed to ridicule Eric for "being so stupid" for not taking her back. Where to begin? For one, the previous episode focused on the fact that Casey was a known jerkass (in which his younger brother even concurred), and Eric tried to warn Donna that she could be hurt. Donna, of course, shrugged it off. When the inevitable happened, Donna was broken down and crying from the heartbreak, and almost immediately asked Eric if they could get back together. So why should Red and Kitty ridicule Eric for rejecting her? She was clearly shaken, and not thinking straight. And she clearly came back to her "safe, good boy" Eric after her "cool bad boy" boyfriend Casey left her in the dust. Everything about how that situation played out screamed out that Eric was clearly a backup that Donna ran to when feeling loney and shaken. The Broken Aesop additionally plays out when you consider the series' history. It's almost as if Eric was right when he said that his parents (mostly Red) don't truly respect him. Especially if they think he should be somoene's backup. Perhaps they don't think he can do better?

to:

* ''Series/That70sShow'': The episode Season 4 finale "Love, Wisconsin Style" focuses primarily on {{jerkass}} Casey Kelso breaking up with Donna. Donna then attempted to get back together with Eric, but Eric rejected her because he felt like her "backup". Red and Kitty then proceed to ridicule Eric for "being so stupid" for not taking her back. Where to begin? For one, the previous episode episode, "Everybody Loves Casey", focused on the fact that Casey was a known jerkass (in which his younger brother even concurred), and Eric tried to warn Donna that she could be hurt. Donna, of course, shrugged it off. When the inevitable happened, Donna was broken down and crying from the heartbreak, and almost immediately asked Eric if they could get back together. So why should Red and Kitty ridicule Eric for rejecting her? She was clearly shaken, and not thinking straight. And she clearly came back to her "safe, good boy" Eric after her "cool bad boy" boyfriend Casey left her in the dust. Everything about how that situation played out screamed out that Eric was clearly a backup that Donna ran to when feeling loney and shaken. The Broken Aesop additionally plays out when you consider the series' history. It's almost as if Eric was right when he said that his parents (mostly Red) don't truly respect him. Especially if they think he should be somoene's backup. Perhaps they don't think he can do better?



* ''Series/TheWestWing'': The two-parter "[[Recap/TheWestWingS04E01TwentyHoursInAmericaPartOne 24 Hours in America]]" ends with Donna eloquently scolding Toby and Josh for politicizing everything, telling them that, in all the time they were traveling from Indiana to D.C., no one brought up the Bartlet vs. Ritchie election except them. It's a nice speech, but it's not true: at several points along the way, when Toby or Josh merely mentions working for Bartlet, whoever they were talking to would immediately shoot back a surly, "Didn't vote for him the first time, don't plan to the second time."

to:

* ''Series/TheWestWing'': The Season 4 premiere two-parter "[[Recap/TheWestWingS04E01TwentyHoursInAmericaPartOne 24 Hours in America]]" ends with Donna eloquently scolding Toby and Josh for politicizing everything, telling them that, in all the time they were traveling from Indiana to D.C., no one brought up the Bartlet vs. Ritchie election except them. It's a nice speech, but it's not true: at several points along the way, when Toby or Josh merely mentions working for Bartlet, whoever they were talking to would immediately shoot back a surly, "Didn't vote for him the first time, don't plan to the second time."



** The episode "Moving On" is all about how Justin needs to move on and be open to new relationships after his girlfriend (a vampire) gets scratched by a werewolf (Alex's boyfriend) and RapidAging sets in, causing her to run into the woods to hide. Near the end of "Wizards Vs. Everything", guess who comes back, returned to her teenage form and ready to date Justin again?

to:

** The Season 3 episode "Moving On" is all about how Justin needs to move on and be open to new relationships after his girlfriend (a vampire) gets scratched by a werewolf (Alex's boyfriend) and RapidAging sets in, causing her to run into the woods to hide. Near the end of "Wizards Vs. Everything", guess who comes back, returned to her teenage form and ready to date Justin again?



** In the episode "Here She Comes, Miss Amphipolis" Xena has to go undercover in a beauty pageant, and finds that one of the other contestants has only entered because she wants to get a winter's supply of food for her village. At the end of the episode (along with the other girls), she quits, stating that winning the competition isn't worth losing her pride and dignity. First of all (according to her), she's already lost it, so she may as well have hung in there and gotten a winter's supply of food to go with it. Secondly, endangering the lives of hungry children over the winter isn't a particularly good reason to quit a competition for the sake of one's dignity. Thirdly, it doesn't seem to occur to her that she had her pride and dignity ''all along'' considering she only entered the pageant in the first place for the sake of others. For an episode that was meant to demonstrate that beauty pageant contestants aren't just pretty faces, they really missed the boat with this one. It gets [[CluelessAesop slightly more off-key]], since most beauty pageants aren't held for charity, and when they are, the charitable donations don't go ''to the winner''.

to:

** In the Season 2 episode "Here She Comes, Miss Amphipolis" Xena has to go undercover in a beauty pageant, and finds that one of the other contestants has only entered because she wants to get a winter's supply of food for her village. At the end of the episode (along with the other girls), she quits, stating that winning the competition isn't worth losing her pride and dignity. First of all (according to her), she's already lost it, so she may as well have hung in there and gotten a winter's supply of food to go with it. Secondly, endangering the lives of hungry children over the winter isn't a particularly good reason to quit a competition for the sake of one's dignity. Thirdly, it doesn't seem to occur to her that she had her pride and dignity ''all along'' considering she only entered the pageant in the first place for the sake of others. For an episode that was meant to demonstrate that beauty pageant contestants aren't just pretty faces, they really missed the boat with this one. It gets [[CluelessAesop slightly more off-key]], since most beauty pageants aren't held for charity, and when they are, the charitable donations don't go ''to the winner''.
25th Jul '16 12:49:06 PM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** "The Face of Evil" is based on the premise that the Doctor's egotistical attempts to save a space mission AI (by simply imposing a print of his own brain over it instead of actually fixing the problem) led to the AI becoming an insane God who selectively breeds the settlers into opposing CargoCult factions that worship him, and creating a dystopic {{Egopolis}} based on the Doctor's image. It all seems like it's set up to criticise the Doctor's big ego and ChronicHeroSyndrome... but it ends with the AI, having realised who it is, asking the Doctor for an explanation as to where he went wrong, absolving the Doctor of all responsibility and even having 'God' ask him for tips on how to be better. Striking because the new series absolutely would ''never'' have missed the opportunity to criticise the Doctor's god complex.
This list shows the last 10 events of 190. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BrokenAesop.LiveActionTV