History BrokenAesop / LiveActionTV

25th Sep '17 4:55:44 PM FictionFan101
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** Jon Snow has been made Lord Commander of the Night's Watch and King in the North mainly for his prowess in battle. Everyone seems to have forgotten that the whole purpose of King Robert's character from Season 1 was to show that good warriors tend to be terrible rulers. As if to drive the point home, Jon has shown very little interest in ruling, choosing instead to ride off into danger and leave the role of governance to his followers. Who knows? Give Jon a decade or two when the crisis is long past, and he may be a fat, drunk, pathetic wreck of a man too.

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** Jon Snow has been made Lord Commander of the Night's Watch and King in the North mainly for his prowess in battle. Everyone seems to have forgotten The show presents both of these events as good things, seemingly forgetting that the whole purpose of King Robert's character from Season 1 was to show that good warriors tend to be terrible rulers. As if to drive the point home, Jon has shown very little interest in ruling, choosing instead to ride off into danger and leave the role of governance to his followers. Who knows? Give Jon a decade or two when the crisis is long past, and he may be a fat, drunk, pathetic wreck of a man too.rulers.
25th Sep '17 6:46:28 AM FictionFan101
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** Jon Snow has been made Lord Commander of the Night's Watch and King in the North mainly for his prowess in battle. Everyone seems to have forgotten that the whole purpose of King Robert's character from Season 1 was to show that good warriors tend to be terrible rulers. As if to drive the point home, Jon has shown very little interest in ruling, choosing instead to ride off into danger and leave the role of governance to his followers. Who knows? Give Jon a decade or two when the crisis is long past, and he may be a fat, drunk, pathetic wreck of a man too.
12th Sep '17 8:22:48 AM Cameron178
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* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}: One episode had Katie reeling from her breakup with Drew, who left her for Bianca. After spending most of the episode depressed and angry, she decided that the best way to deal with her feelings was to show a video of Drew drunkenly bragging about the two of them having sex...during a school event that she herself organized. Drew got dumped by Bianca (but the two of them eventually got back together.) Meanwhile, Katie got suspended and lost her position in the student council, but she said that was ok and she was free now. The episode ended with her smiling over she had done. That's right: the message is that revenge on an ex is worth losing everything you have worked hard on for years and getting a black mark on your record.
12th Sep '17 12:44:52 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' starts by showing how the treatment of illegitimate children in Westerosi society is profoundly unjust, and something that otherwise well-meaning characters like Jon Snow struggle with due to [[BastardAngst never being fully accepted into their father's households]]. This is eventually undermined by Ramsay Snow and the Sand Snakes all being {{Bastard Bastard}}s who fully deserve their reputation by murdering all of their trueborn relatives to seize power, and the only HeroicBastard being revealed as a legitimate heir to two powerful Houses all along.
15th Aug '17 5:15:26 AM MagBas
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** Though another way to look at this is that Eric originally broke up with Donna because he allowed his insecurities to control him. Eric felt Donna was pulling away from the relationship so he broke up with her so she wouldn't be able to eventually leave him, even though Donna never expressed any desire to do so. If anything, Casey was the rebound guy and Donna was only with him because she couldn't be with Eric. So when Donna asked Eric to get back together, his parents saw it as an opportunity to undo a stupid mistake and thought Eric was stupid for squandering it. Not that calling him a dumbass was the best way to help his confidence issues.
14th Aug '17 10:30:25 PM dbdude01
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* The short-lived reality dating show ''Series/BeautyAndTheGeek'' was basically a Broken Aesop incarnate. The premise was that a beautiful, though superficial model was brought into the show on false pretenses, and was forced to date a dozen dorky, unattractive nerds instead of the hunks she was promised. The implied understanding was that she would eventually come to realize that appearances are only skin deep etc etc. However, halfway through the season a team of actual hunks were abruptly thrown into the mix, competing against the nerds. After the crowd was whittled down to the two final men — one nerd, one hunk — ''the beauty always chose the hunk!''

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* The short-lived reality dating show ''Series/BeautyAndTheGeek'' ''Series/AverageJoe'' was basically a Broken Aesop incarnate. The premise was that a beautiful, though superficial model was brought into the show on false pretenses, and was forced to date a dozen dorky, unattractive nerds instead of the hunks she was promised. The implied understanding was that she would eventually come to realize that appearances are only skin deep etc etc. However, halfway through the season a team of actual hunks were abruptly thrown into the mix, competing against the nerds. After the crowd was whittled down to the two final men — one nerd, one hunk — ''the beauty always chose the hunk!''


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** Though another way to look at this is that Eric originally broke up with Donna because he allowed his insecurities to control him. Eric felt Donna was pulling away from the relationship so he broke up with her so she wouldn't be able to eventually leave him, even though Donna never expressed any desire to do so. If anything, Casey was the rebound guy and Donna was only with him because she couldn't be with Eric. So when Donna asked Eric to get back together, his parents saw it as an opportunity to undo a stupid mistake and thought Eric was stupid for squandering it. Not that calling him a dumbass was the best way to help his confidence issues.
20th Jul '17 8:48:34 PM Gravidef
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** One ChristmasEpisode saw Stephanie and Michelle greedily thinking about all the presents they'll be getting. Uncle Jesse promises to give them a truly unique gift; later, the girls come home and reveal that the mystery gift was time spent volunteering at a homeless shelter. Stephanie and Michelle talk about how eye-opening and inspiring the visit was...a visit that ''the audience never sees.'' And neither of them imply that they're going to give up any of the presents they received anyway to homeless people. S

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** One ChristmasEpisode saw Stephanie and Michelle greedily thinking about all the presents they'll be getting. Uncle Jesse promises to give them a truly unique gift; later, the girls come home and reveal that the mystery gift was time spent volunteering at a homeless shelter. Stephanie and Michelle talk about how eye-opening and inspiring the visit was...a visit that ''the audience never sees.'' And neither of them imply that they're going to give up any of the presents they received anyway to homeless people. Speople.
** Another ChristmasEpisode had the whole family stranded in an airport on Christmas Eve; the presents get lost, the connecting flights are all snowed in, and everyone's miserable in general. Uncle Jesse then steps up to give a speech about how Christmas isn't about material things. How does he do that? By comparing random objects in the airport to material things. So he's cancelling out his own Aesop ''as he's speaking''. And then, just to twist the knife further, [[RealAfterAll the real Santa Claus]] shows up to magically summon the girls' missing presents, so they get them anyway. What is it about this show and Christmas episodes?
20th Jul '17 8:43:34 PM Gravidef
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** A later episode of had Jesse going back to school so he can get his GED. The Aesop of “stay in school, no matter what” ends up being undermined by the fact that he has to deal with the same rude teacher who was convinced that he would never amount to anything and who scared him away from his education in the first place. Oh, sure on one hand he should not have let him deter him from graduating, but on the other hand, what the hell is wrong with that board of education for allowing such an unprofessional and condescending JerkAss that has no problem humiliating others to continue teaching students? Even worse, at the end of the episode, it was ''[[StrawLoser Jesse]]'' [[StrawLoser who was completely in the wrong for not staying in the class.]] What's more, Jesse isn't exactly a loser; some of the (very successful) jobs he's had over the years have included rock star, nightclub owner, and Radio DJ, plus he's got a hot wife and is clearly doing well for himself. Not graduating clearly hasn't hurt his life in the slightest.
** Popular blogger Billy Superstar of ''Full House Reviewed'' has also pointed out that many times--especially in the later seasons, when [[CreatorsPet Michelle]] became the major focus of most plots--the intended Aesops of "Sometimes things don't work out the way you want to" or "You don't always get what you want" almost ''always'' fall flat. Why? Because after Michelle (or, more rarely, Stephanie or D.J.) decides to accept the lesson, they're immediately rewarded with what they wanted in the first place. For instance, in one episode, Michelle is upset because she doesn't get to play Yankee Doodle in a school play; after she accepts her new role and encourages Derek, who's playing Yankee Doodle, to do the best he can, he makes up an entire verse of the song all about her to sing to everyone. Similarly, in "Day of the Rhino," Michelle is tricked into spending her saved-up money on what turns out to be a cheap toy given away by Rigby the Rhino, her favorite TV character. She leads a protest against his unfair tricks, which Joey praises as the right thing to do, as she may have kept other kids from making the same mistake she did... but then Rigby literally ''shows up at the Tanner'' house to give Michelle a much better toy!

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** A later episode of had Jesse going back to school so he can get his GED. The Aesop of “stay in school, no matter what” ends up being undermined by the fact that he has to deal with the same rude teacher who was convinced that he would never amount to anything and who scared him away from his education in the first place. Oh, sure on one hand he should not have let him deter him from graduating, but on the other hand, what the hell is wrong with that board of education for allowing such an unprofessional and condescending JerkAss that has no problem humiliating others to continue teaching students? Even worse, at the end of the episode, it was ''[[StrawLoser Jesse]]'' [[StrawLoser who was completely in the wrong for not staying in the class.]] What's more, Jesse isn't exactly a loser; some of the (very successful) jobs he's had over the years have included rock star, nightclub owner, and Radio DJ, plus he's got a hot wife and is clearly doing well for himself. Not graduating clearly hasn't hurt his life in the slightest.
** Popular blogger Billy Superstar of ''Full House Reviewed'' has also pointed out that many times--especially in the later seasons, when [[CreatorsPet Michelle]] became the major focus of most plots--the intended Aesops of "Sometimes things don't work out the way you want to" or "You don't always get what you want" almost ''always'' fall flat. Why? Because after Michelle (or, more rarely, Stephanie or D.J.) decides to accept the lesson, they're immediately rewarded with what they wanted in the first place. For instance, in one episode, Michelle is upset because she doesn't get to play Yankee Doodle in a school play; after she accepts her new role and encourages Derek, who's playing Yankee Doodle, to do the best he can, he makes up an entire verse of the song all about her to sing to everyone. Similarly, in "Day of the Rhino," Michelle is tricked into spending her saved-up money on what turns out to be a cheap toy given away by Rigby the Rhino, her favorite TV character. She leads a protest against his unfair tricks, which and while she doesn't get her money back, Joey praises as the right thing to do, as she may have kept her for speaking up and therefore keeping other kids from making the same mistake she did... but then Rigby literally ''shows up at the Tanner'' house Tanner house'' to give Michelle a much better toy!



** In another episode, Danny dumps a woman he's been dating after seeing what a slob she is. When he tells Joey and Jesse about this, they gently, but firmly tell him that everytime he meets a woman he likes, [[MinorFlawMajorBreakup he dumps her for some ridiculous reason]] because he still misses his late wife and doesn't want to let her go. They lecture him about how unhealthy this pattern is, etc, etc. This is all true. . . except Danny didn't break up with this woman for a dumb reason. He dumped her because her apartment looked like a trash heap, something that would bother anybody, especially a NeatFreak like Danny.

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** In another episode, Danny dumps a woman he's been dating after seeing what a slob she is. When he tells Joey and Jesse about this, they gently, but firmly tell him that everytime he meets a woman he likes, [[MinorFlawMajorBreakup he dumps her for some ridiculous reason]] because he still misses his late wife and doesn't want to let her go. They lecture him about how unhealthy this pattern is, etc, etc. This is all true. . . true...except Danny didn't break up with this woman for a dumb reason. He dumped her because her apartment looked like a trash heap, something that would bother anybody, especially a NeatFreak like Danny.Danny.
** The episode "Aftershocks" tries to promote a positive message about therapy, and how parents shouldn't be embarrassed to admit that their children need help, by having Stephanie become obsessively clingy to Danny after an earthquake. The Aesop falls apart because Stephanie is only in therapy for about ten minutes: the psychologist asks her to draw a picture of her family, and Stephanie depicts Danny as outside of the house, because he was late getting home during the earthquake and she didn't know where he was. The psychologist suggests making a list of ways for Stephanie to feel better about knowing where Danny is, and she's apparently cured of her separation anxiety, which makes the Aesop seem like "if you talk to a therapist for a few minutes and draw a picture, all of your problems will be revealed and instantly solved." Yeah...
** One ChristmasEpisode saw Stephanie and Michelle greedily thinking about all the presents they'll be getting. Uncle Jesse promises to give them a truly unique gift; later, the girls come home and reveal that the mystery gift was time spent volunteering at a homeless shelter. Stephanie and Michelle talk about how eye-opening and inspiring the visit was...a visit that ''the audience never sees.'' And neither of them imply that they're going to give up any of the presents they received anyway to homeless people. S



** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite its pro-tolerance and inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged, for instance a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she would have eventually cheated with a man, and is never called out for it, and a transwoman forced to dress as a man on school property is basically told to suck it up.

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** Much of the criticism of ''Glee'' stems from a perception that, despite its pro-tolerance and inclusive message, it frequently undercuts itself through the fact that many of its minority [[note]]Anyone who is not white, American and either hetero- or homosexual[[/note]] characters are heavily stereotyped and often reduced to background roles, e.g. an Asian character freaking out over an A-, calling it an "Asian F". It also doesn't help matters that, while the show routinely condemns homophobia; biphobic or transphobic statements made in-universe go by almost entirely unchallenged, for instance unchallenged. For instance, a lesbian dumps her bisexual girlfriend on the assumption that she would have eventually cheated with a man, and is never called out for it, and a transwoman forced to dress as a man on school property is basically told to suck it up.up. In another instance, Kurt--who's [[CreatorsPet the show's poster boy]] for "Don't mock/bully/harm gay people"--becomes upset when Blaine thinks he might be bisexual after kissing Rachel while drunk. Kurt (remember--the one who tells us that bullying is never, ever, ever, ever right) ''outright says that's impossible'', and that [[NoBisexuals bisexual men are clearly just gay guys who don't want to admit it]]. Blaine tries to speak up for himself, but Kurt keeps shooting him down. And guess who's proven right in the end? Kurt, of course! Because Blaine was gay all along!



** One episode had a visit by Blanche's estranged daughter Rebecca, who, during her time in Paris, has become [[FormerlyFit very overweight]]. Rebecca wants to introduce her mother to her boyfriend, who's an asshole: he verbally abuses her and makes cruel, rude comments about her weight. This is treated as unacceptable, and she dumps him in the end. But the moral of the story breaks, because the whole first half of the episode involves some fat jokes being made at her expense (either by [[ScrewPolitenessImASenior snarky Sophia]] or by [[InnocentlyInsensitive dumb Rose]] ) and ends with Blanche suggesting they go outside rather than the previous intent to eat some cheesecake.

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** One episode had a visit by Blanche's estranged daughter Rebecca, who, during her time in Paris, has become [[FormerlyFit very overweight]]. Rebecca wants to introduce her mother to her boyfriend, boyfriend Jeremy, who's an asshole: a massive JerkAss: he verbally abuses her and makes cruel, rude comments about her weight. This is treated as unacceptable, and she dumps him in the end. But the moral of the story breaks, because the whole first half of the episode involves some fat jokes being made at her expense (either by [[ScrewPolitenessImASenior snarky Sophia]] or by [[InnocentlyInsensitive dumb Rose]] ) and ends with Blanche suggesting they go outside rather than the previous intent to eat some cheesecake. It's somewhat justified in that Sophia can't censor her statements due to a stroke and Rose is, to be frank, too stupid to realize that she's being mean; furthermore, Blanche's initial statements about Rebecca's weight are treated as serious by the younger woman, who makes it clear that she won't take her mother's interference any longer. But still, it could have been presented better--especially because Rebecca was later recast, with a much thinner actress playing the role.
14th Jul '17 10:09:29 AM Arivne
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* In ''Series/HighwayToHeaven'':

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* In ''Series/HighwayToHeaven'':''Series/HighwayToHeaven''
14th Jul '17 8:38:47 AM Arivne
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** On a related note, the times the Doctor questions whether he should kill the villains or not contradicts itself. A MonsterOfTheWeek will be slaughtered without a second thought, regardless of motives but when it comes to recurring aliens like the Daleks or the Master,who have proven to be AlwaysChaoticEvil or unlikely to change no matter what, it is suddenly wrong to kill them.

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** On a related note, the times the Doctor questions whether he should kill the villains or not contradicts itself. A MonsterOfTheWeek will be slaughtered without a second thought, regardless of motives but when it comes to recurring aliens like the Daleks or the Master,who Master, who have proven to be AlwaysChaoticEvil or unlikely to change no matter what, it is suddenly wrong to kill them.
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