History BrokenAesop / LiveActionTV

17th Jun '17 8:19:52 AM mario0987
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** "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS4E5BeerBad Beer Bad]]" is notorious for its {{Anvilicious}}ness, but its message also just doesn't work. The plot would not change in ''any way'' if the beverage were soda. The moral, if there is one, is "Don't accept food or drink from people who hate you," or possibly "Be polite to waiters and bartenders, because if they snap they can totally mess you up." Which aren't actually bad lessons, albeit a little situational. But as for the beer, the intended moral target? Foamy. In fact, the episode was made to procure funding from the anti-alcohol lobby, who then noticed the broken message and refused to pay up.

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** "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS4E5BeerBad Beer Bad]]" is notorious for its {{Anvilicious}}ness, but its message also just doesn't work. The reason the beer caused the problem is because someone tampered with it. The plot would not change in ''any way'' if the beverage were soda. The moral, if there is one, is "Don't accept food or drink from people who hate you," or possibly "Be polite to waiters and bartenders, because if they snap they can totally mess you up." Which aren't actually bad lessons, albeit a little situational. But as for the beer, the intended moral target? Foamy. In fact, the episode was made to procure funding from the anti-alcohol lobby, who then noticed the broken message and refused to pay up.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]" is yet another and even worse example of the series trying to suggest that the Doctor's attitude to the Daleks is FantasticRacism while still depicting them as AlwaysChaoticEvil. The Doctor treats his clone as wrong for wiping out the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity they're back next series]]), saying it shows how violent and brutal he is. Yet the Daleks had just come very close to wiping out entire Universes and are fictions poster creature for ScaryDogmaticAliens. The Doctor had temporarily incapacitated them but considering how resourceful they are it was unlikely they would have remained like that for long. The moral makes even less sense considering that 10 in the same series had basically done the same thing to a race that wasn't as dangerous as the Daleks and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, even if this was what history decreed. Meanwhile his clone was only wiping out the Daleks and ([[JokerImmunity possibly]]) their OmnicidalManiac Creator Davros, who refused a chance to be saved by the Doctor. Not only that but when the Doctor declined a chance to destroy the last Dalek in their previous appearance, claiming there has been too much death today, that Dalek had escaped and caused the problems of this episode. Not only that but that Dalek had been responsible for most of the deaths, killing the Dalek-Humans that numbered over a thousand because they were not Dalek enough.
** The Doctor talking about how wonderful and resourceful humanity is can be slightly undermined by the fact a lot of their achievements and survival are due to him and many other aliens, the Daemons, the Osirians and the Silence to name a few. It makes you wonder -- what about other races that don't have the benefit of the Doctor helping them out? To be fair, in that story the Doctor may just be using the clone Doctor's supposed 'genocide' of the Daleks as a convenient excuse to put the human Doctor onto Rose and prevent her from damaging the universe through the disk-hopping.

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]" is yet another and even worse example of the series trying to suggest that the Doctor's attitude to the Daleks is FantasticRacism while still depicting them as AlwaysChaoticEvil. The Doctor treats his clone as wrong for wiping out the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity they're back next series]]), saying it shows how violent and brutal he is. Yet the Daleks had just come very close to wiping out entire Universes and are fictions poster creature for ScaryDogmaticAliens. The Doctor had temporarily incapacitated them but considering how resourceful they are it was unlikely they would have remained like that for long. The moral makes even less sense considering that 10 in the same series had basically done the same thing to a race that wasn't as dangerous as the Daleks and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, even if this was what history decreed. Meanwhile his clone was only wiping out the Daleks and ([[JokerImmunity possibly]]) their OmnicidalManiac Creator Davros, who refused a chance to be saved by the Doctor. Not only that but when the Doctor declined a chance to destroy the last Dalek in their previous appearance, claiming there has been too much death today, that Dalek had escaped and caused the problems of this episode. Not only that but that Dalek had been responsible for most of the deaths, killing the Dalek-Humans that numbered over a thousand because they were not Dalek enough.
enough. To be fair, the Doctor may just be using the clone Doctor's supposed 'genocide' of the Daleks as a convenient excuse to put the human Doctor onto Rose and prevent her from damaging the universe through the disk-hopping.
** On a related note, the times the Doctor questions whether he should kill the villains or not contradicts itself. A MonsterOfTheWeek will be slaughtered without a second thought, regardless of motives but when it comes to recurring aliens like the Daleks or the Master,who have proven to be AlwaysChaoticEvil or unlikely to change no matter what, it is suddenly wrong to kill them.
** The Doctor talking about how wonderful and resourceful humanity is can be slightly undermined by the fact a lot of their achievements and survival are due to him and many other aliens, the Daemons, the Osirians and the Silence to name a few. It makes you wonder -- what about other races that don't have the benefit of the Doctor helping them out? To be fair, in that story the Doctor may just be using the clone Doctor's supposed 'genocide' of the Daleks as a convenient excuse to put the human Doctor onto Rose and prevent her from damaging the universe through the disk-hopping.
6th Jun '17 9:00:08 AM DoctorNemesis
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E13ThePartingOfTheWays The Parting of the Ways]]" has the Ninth Doctor decline from destroying Earth to destroy the Daleks, claiming that it's the morally better choice to not wipe out humanity with the Daleks. However the Daleks have just attacked Earth with such force they have distorted continents, meaning they have probably wiped out at least nearly all humanity and any survivors will soon be either killed, enslaved or turned into Daleks, which is clearly a FateWorseThanDeath, the Dalek Emperor even saying humanity will be harvested. The Doctor even points out that humanity won't be wiped out with Earth as they have spread to other worlds by now, "You're the only Daleks in existence. The whole universe is in danger if I let you live". But the Daleks surviving means they'll attack other worlds, giving humanity even less of a chance. It's only a literal DeusExMachina that saves possibly the Universe from the Daleks. Overall the Doctor's decision, considering he may well be the only non-Dalek in range of the delta wave and the Daleks are about to exterminate him anyway, looks quite odd.

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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E13ThePartingOfTheWays The Parting of the Ways]]" has the Ninth Doctor decline from destroying Earth to destroy the Daleks, claiming that it's the morally better choice to not wipe out humanity with the Daleks. However the Daleks have just attacked Earth with such force they have distorted continents, meaning they have probably wiped out at least nearly all humanity and any survivors will soon be either killed, enslaved or turned into Daleks, which is clearly a FateWorseThanDeath, the Dalek Emperor even saying humanity will be harvested. The Doctor even points out that humanity won't be wiped out with Earth as they have spread to other worlds by now, "You're the only Daleks in existence. The whole universe is in danger if I let you live". But the Daleks surviving means they'll attack other worlds, giving humanity even less of a chance. It's only a literal DeusExMachina that saves possibly the Universe from the Daleks. Overall the Doctor's decision, considering he may well be the only non-Dalek in range of the delta wave and the Daleks are about to exterminate him anyway, looks quite odd. It is suggested that his actions are based on his overwhelming guilt at having to destroy the Time Lords in order to also destroy the Daleks, he's too broken and demoralised to essentially make the same decision once again with Earth, and that he's just looking for any thin shred of hope that will justify him not doing so.
4th Jun '17 5:38:07 AM MGD107
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%%** Also in season 1, Puck wants to be recognized as the father of Quinn's baby. Mercedes gives him a stern talking-to, saying Quinn has already chosen the man she wants to be her baby's father, and it's Finn. Who doesn't know it isn't his and has been led to believe that the baby is his responsibility whether he wants it or not. And doesn't know that Quinn cheated on him with his best friend. Yep, the decision is all Quinn's.

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%%** ** Also in season 1, Puck wants to be recognized as the father of Quinn's baby. Mercedes gives him a stern talking-to, saying Quinn has already chosen the man she wants to be her baby's father, and it's Finn. Who doesn't know it isn't his and has been led to believe that the baby is his responsibility whether he wants it or not. And doesn't know that Quinn cheated on him with his best friend. Yep, the decision is all Quinn's.
29th May '17 2:19:36 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* A ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch parodying ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode "The Eye of the Beholder" intentionally does this by having the male characters look at the "ugly" patient (played by Creator/PamelaAnderson) and proclaim, "She's hot!" Not only did they {{lampshade|Hanging}} this trope, they slightly-more-subtly sent a message of modern media eschewing thought-provoking entertainment in favor of gratuitous T&A that ensures ratings. They took this even further by having all the characters ''except'' the patient literally have pig noses, and the male pig-people complain that after having seen the patient, they would no longer be able to stand looking at their pig-faced wives. This drives a pig-nurse to angrily point out (to no avail) that [[YouAreWhatYouHate the men had pig faces themselves]]!

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* A ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch parodying ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode "The Eye of the Beholder" intentionally does this by having the male characters look at the "ugly" patient (played by Creator/PamelaAnderson) and proclaim, "She's hot!" Not only did they {{lampshade|Hanging}} this trope, they slightly-more-subtly sent a message of modern media eschewing thought-provoking entertainment in favor of gratuitous T&A that ensures ratings. They took this even further by having all the characters ''except'' the patient literally have pig noses, and the male pig-people complain that after having seen the patient, they would no longer be able to stand looking at their pig-faced wives. This drives a pig-nurse to angrily point out (to no avail) that [[YouAreWhatYouHate the men had pig faces themselves]]!themselves]]! Even Rod Serling (played by Creator/NormMacDonald) has to concede that he didn't have a point this time, because c'mon; she really ''was'' hot.
19th May '17 1:20:48 PM MagBas
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** The ending of "Guilt" would have you believe that Cabot's crossed the MoralEventHorizon by using a fake search warrant to stop the BigBad once and for all. Despite the facts that (1) all of her clean attempts to stop him have failed, (2) he's an unrepentant and unwilling-to-stop pedophile, (3) she still goes out of her way to shift the blame for the fake warrant onto herself and away from her colleagues, and (4) she's definitely not the type to convict someone innocent just to wrap things up. While she definitely enters gray territory here, she comes across as much more of a DesignatedVillain and/or PragmaticHero than the AmoralAttorney and/or KnightTemplar that her superiors won't stop vilifying her as. [[note]]Especially glaring is that she initially does try to get a real warrant, only for the respective judge to rather-obnoxiously '''''laugh her off''''' because of a seeming lack of enough probable cause.[[/note]]
19th May '17 12:09:33 PM Peridonyx
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** The ending of "Guilt" would have you believe that Cabot's practically crossed the MoralEventHorizon by using a fake search warrant to stop the BigBad once and for all. Despite the facts that all of her clean attempts to stop him have utterly failed, he's an unrepentant and unwilling-to-stop pedophile, she still goes out of her way to shift the blame for the fake warrant all toward herself and away from her colleagues, and she's definitely not the type to convict someone innocent just to wrap things up. While she definitely enters gray territory here, she comes across as much more of a DesignatedVillain and/or PragmaticHero than the AmoralAttorney and/or KnightTemplar that her superiors won't seem to stop vilifying her as.

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** The ending of "Guilt" would have you believe that Cabot's practically crossed the MoralEventHorizon by using a fake search warrant to stop the BigBad once and for all. Despite the facts that (1) all of her clean attempts to stop him have utterly failed, (2) he's an unrepentant and unwilling-to-stop pedophile, (3) she still goes out of her way to shift the blame for the fake warrant all toward onto herself and away from her colleagues, and (4) she's definitely not the type to convict someone innocent just to wrap things up. While she definitely enters gray territory here, she comes across as much more of a DesignatedVillain and/or PragmaticHero than the AmoralAttorney and/or KnightTemplar that her superiors won't seem to stop vilifying her as.as. [[note]]Especially glaring is that she initially does try to get a real warrant, only for the respective judge to rather-obnoxiously '''''laugh her off''''' because of a seeming lack of enough probable cause.[[/note]]
15th May '17 12:35:52 AM RobTan
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%%** Also in season 1, Puck wants to be recognized as the father of Quinn's baby. Mercedes gives him a stern talking-to, saying Quinn has already chosen the man she wants to be her baby's father, and it's Finn. Who doesn't know it isn't his and has been led to believe that the baby is his responsibility whether he wants it or not. And doesn't know that Quinn cheated on him with his best friend. Yep, the decision is all Quinn's.


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%%** Also in season 1, Puck wants to be recognized as the father of Quinn's baby. Mercedes gives him a stern talking-to, saying Quinn has already chosen the man she wants to be her baby's father, and it's Finn. Who doesn't know it isn't his and has been led to believe that the baby is his responsibility whether he wants it or not. And doesn't know that Quinn cheated on him with his best friend. Yep, the decision is all Quinn's.
18th Apr '17 5:59:24 PM nombretomado
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* On the Nevada Day episode of ''Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'', The writers clearly tried to get across a message about how not everyone in small towns is an unreasonable, stuck in the dark ages bible bashing gun-nut (To the point where John Goodman's character actually says something to that effect). Its a nice if glaringly obvious aesop that gets broken because the Judge was giving them every reason to believe that he really was as bad as they thought he was. When he comes into the sheriff's office, He puts a holstered gun on the table,refers to nearby chinese people as "Japs", refuses to listen to any legal arguments from the attorney and threatens to have him shot if he keeps talking (I.e, actually trying to defend his client) and claims to have never heard of the station they work for. He then has a good laugh at their expense and chastises them in a manner clearly directed at audience members who had made their mind up. Its like calling someone a racist name and chastising them for assuming you're racist. The judge even tells Tom that he doesn't like his show in a manner that basically says "I don't like what you do for a living so I'm not going to be fair or do my job right". The only thing that saves Tom is having a brother in the army and we never get a sense that the judge would have been fair or lenient otherwise. It also doesn't help that the show has previously shown Tom's parents from the midwest as so hopelessly out of touch with pop culture that they've never heard of Abbot & Costello despite presumable growing up in the 1950's.

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* On the Nevada Day episode of ''Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'', ''Series/Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'', The writers clearly tried to get across a message about how not everyone in small towns is an unreasonable, stuck in the dark ages bible bashing gun-nut (To the point where John Goodman's character actually says something to that effect). Its a nice if glaringly obvious aesop that gets broken because the Judge was giving them every reason to believe that he really was as bad as they thought he was. When he comes into the sheriff's office, He puts a holstered gun on the table,refers to nearby chinese people as "Japs", refuses to listen to any legal arguments from the attorney and threatens to have him shot if he keeps talking (I.e, actually trying to defend his client) and claims to have never heard of the station they work for. He then has a good laugh at their expense and chastises them in a manner clearly directed at audience members who had made their mind up. Its like calling someone a racist name and chastising them for assuming you're racist. The judge even tells Tom that he doesn't like his show in a manner that basically says "I don't like what you do for a living so I'm not going to be fair or do my job right". The only thing that saves Tom is having a brother in the army and we never get a sense that the judge would have been fair or lenient otherwise. It also doesn't help that the show has previously shown Tom's parents from the midwest as so hopelessly out of touch with pop culture that they've never heard of Abbot & Costello despite presumable growing up in the 1950's.
17th Apr '17 7:33:29 PM DrOO7
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** In another episode, Danny dumps a woman he's been dating after seeing what a slob she is. When he tells Joey and Jesse about this, they gently, but firmly tell him that everytime he meets a woman he likes, [[MinorFlawMajorBreakup he dumps her for some ridiculous reason]] because he still misses his late wife and doesn't want to let her go. They lecture him about how unhealthy this pattern is, etc, etc. This is all true. . . except Danny didn't break up with this woman for a dumb reason. He dumped her because her apartment looked like a trash heap, something that would bother anybody, especially a NeatFreak like Danny.
30th Mar '17 3:08:11 AM CumbersomeTercel
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** "The Ark" is about a slave race, the Monoids, who are mute and subservient to humans. After a plague occurs, the Monoids eventually rise up over the humans and enslave them instead. The (apparent) attempted moral is announced at the end of the episode when the Doctor tells the humans and Monoids that they need to live in equality to survive, but thanks to WhatMeasureIsANonHuman writing (in which the Doctor doesn't care about the deaths of tens of Monoids but realises it's an emergency when a human dies) and the fact that the Monoids' defining character traits are being "savages" and [[IdiotBall making terrible tactical decisions for no reasons other than to allow the humans to win]], how the Monoids are returned to an underclass at the end, and how the story was made in 1966, it comes across more like a racist allegory for how extending civil rights will cause the oppressor to become oppressed by a race that can only run civilisation with incompetent savagery unless they are returned to HappinessInSlavery. Philip Sandifer of the TARDIS Eruditorum subscribes to this interpretation and believes the stupidity of the Monoids was intentional, rather than the SpecialEffectFailure it is generally imagined as.

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** "The Ark" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E6TheArk The Ark]]" is about a slave race, the Monoids, who are mute and subservient to humans. After a plague occurs, the Monoids eventually rise up over the humans and enslave them instead. The (apparent) attempted moral is announced at the end of the episode when the Doctor tells the humans and Monoids that they need to live in equality to survive, but thanks to WhatMeasureIsANonHuman writing (in which the Doctor doesn't care about the deaths of tens of Monoids but realises it's an emergency when a human dies) and the fact that the Monoids' defining character traits are being "savages" and [[IdiotBall making terrible tactical decisions for no reasons other than to allow the humans to win]], how the Monoids are returned to an underclass at the end, and how the story was made in 1966, it comes across more like a racist allegory for how extending civil rights will cause the oppressor to become oppressed by a race that can only run civilisation with incompetent savagery unless they are returned to HappinessInSlavery. Philip Sandifer of the TARDIS Eruditorum subscribes to this interpretation and believes the stupidity of the Monoids was intentional, rather than the SpecialEffectFailure it is generally imagined as.



** "The Dominators" has two. The WordOfGod aim was an allegory about how the hippie movement is bad because they would have got their arses kicked if they'd been in control when the Nazis had invaded. However, the oppressed, pacifistic Dulcians don't work as a hippie allegory, as they're characterised either as elderly politicians or as attractive young people who unthinkingly repeat the elders' lessons by rote until the Doctor and companions turn them against their racist, fascist oppressors, while the old Dulcians get slaughtered through trying to negotiate with AlwaysChaoticEvil aliens. The result is that it comes off as an allegory about how student activism is the future because the apathetic old politicians are only concerned with keeping superficial comfort and not with fixing big societal problems, and have engineered their own destruction. The second is in the B-plot: The villains have an internal conflict, between Rago, who favours caution and condemns meaningless destruction, and Toba, a PsychoForHire who just loves destroying things. The problem is that everything Toba says is right - if he just had blown everyone up on sight (including the Doctor and Jamie) the Dominators would have succeeded in their plan. The result of this is that the story is simultaneously far more left-wing than intended and far more right-wing than intended.
** In the ScriptWank at the end of "Planet of the Daleks", the Doctor delivers a heartfelt speech that the Thals must tell their people WarIsHell, and not to make it sound like their adventure was a 'fun game'. The story involves, amongst other things, them escaping fun, toyetic AlwaysChaoticEvil nasty pepperpot people by [[DressingAsTheEnemy dressing up in purple fur coats]] and MacGyvering a hot air balloon. The reason for this discrepancy is because the scene was appended to the end by Terrance Dicks at the last minute because [[{{Padding}} the script was underrunning]].

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** "The Dominators" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]" has two. The WordOfGod aim was an allegory about how the hippie movement is bad because they would have got their arses kicked if they'd been in control when the Nazis had invaded. However, the oppressed, pacifistic Dulcians don't work as a hippie allegory, as they're characterised either as elderly politicians or as attractive young people who unthinkingly repeat the elders' lessons by rote until the Doctor and companions turn them against their racist, fascist oppressors, while the old Dulcians get slaughtered through trying to negotiate with AlwaysChaoticEvil aliens. The result is that it comes off as an allegory about how student activism is the future because the apathetic old politicians are only concerned with keeping superficial comfort and not with fixing big societal problems, and have engineered their own destruction. The second is in the B-plot: The villains have an internal conflict, between Rago, who favours caution and condemns meaningless destruction, and Toba, a PsychoForHire who just loves destroying things. The problem is that everything Toba says is right - if he just had blown everyone up on sight (including the Doctor and Jamie) the Dominators would have succeeded in their plan. The result of this is that the story is simultaneously far more left-wing than intended and far more right-wing than intended.
** In the ScriptWank at the end of "Planet "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS10E4PlanetOfTheDaleks Planet of the Daleks", Daleks]]", the Doctor delivers a heartfelt speech that the Thals must tell their people WarIsHell, and not to make it sound like their adventure was a 'fun game'. The story involves, amongst other things, them escaping fun, toyetic AlwaysChaoticEvil nasty pepperpot people by [[DressingAsTheEnemy dressing up in purple fur coats]] and MacGyvering a hot air balloon. The reason for this discrepancy is because the scene was appended to the end by Terrance Dicks at the last minute because [[{{Padding}} the script was underrunning]].



** "The Face of Evil" is based on the premise that the Doctor's egotistical attempts to save a space mission AI (by simply imposing a print of his own brain over it instead of actually fixing the problem) led to the AI becoming an insane God who selectively breeds the settlers into opposing CargoCult factions that worship him, and creating a dystopic {{Egopolis}} based on the Doctor's image. It all seems like it's set up to criticise the Doctor's big ego and ChronicHeroSyndrome... but it ends with the AI, having realised who it is, asking the Doctor for an explanation as to where he went wrong, absolving the Doctor of all responsibility and even having 'God' ask him for tips on how to be better. Striking because the new series absolutely would ''never'' have missed the opportunity to criticise the Doctor's god complex.
** "The Sunmakers" is supposed to be a right-wing allegory about how taxation is bad, written by an openly Conservative writer. However, ignoring a few throwaway flippant comments made by the Doctor, the story is really about the evil of taxation that targets the poorest in society, and societies that strip away social safety nets so the untaxed rich can rake in massive profits. The reason for this situation is privatisation, where every utility (including sunlight) is run by corporate interests and the government is viewed only as an extension of the MegaCorp. At the very least, it comes across as left-wing in an Occupy kind of way. If you choose to read into the fact that the Doctor wins by inspiring a populist revolt to execute their leaders while quoting Karl Marx, it becomes actively ''Communist''. Not what you'd expect from something written by a Margaret Thatcher supporter in 1977.
** The character of Whizzkid in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E4TheGreatestShowInTheGalaxy The Greatest Show in the Galaxy]]'' was intended as a TakeThat to fans who criticised 80s Doctor Who by saying it wasn't as good as it used to be in a time they couldn't possibly remember. The problem here is that Whizzkid's similar opinions about the titular Psychic Circus are shown to be absolutely correct. Consequently, all Whizzkid does is vindicate the same fans the character was supposed to be chastising.
** In the episode "Dalek", while the Doctor is certainly being unpleasant in torturing the Lone Dalek, he is treated as wrong for wanting to kill the Dalek and treating it as absolutely evil. However when the Dalek gets free it kills hundreds of people and it is clear it intends to wipe out all humanity. It does gain human feelings but is clearly an exception and Rose's sympathy towards it is largely born from ignorance, while the Doctor knows first-hand how dangerous the Daleks are and is proved right.
** "The Parting of the Ways" has the Ninth Doctor decline from destroying Earth to destroy the Daleks, claiming that it's the morally better choice to not wipe out humanity with the Daleks. However the Daleks have just attacked Earth with such force they have distorted continents, meaning they have probably wiped out at least nearly all humanity and any survivors will soon be either killed, enslaved or turned into Daleks, which is clearly a FateWorseThanDeath, the Dalek Emperor even saying humanity will be harvested. The Doctor even points out that humanity won't be wiped out with Earth as they have spread to other worlds by now, "You're the only Daleks in existence. The whole universe is in danger if I let you live". But the Daleks surviving means they'll attack other worlds, giving humanity even less of a chance. It's only a literal DeusExMachina that saves possibly the Universe from the Daleks. Overall the Doctor's decision, considering he may well be the only non-Dalek in range of the delta wave and the Daleks are about to exterminate him anyway, looks quite odd.
** This seems to be a general problem with Dalek stories in New Who, as "Daleks In Manhattan"[=/=]"Evolution of the Daleks" tries to be a story entirely themed around the evils of racism, while still blatantly depicting humans and Time Lords being good and Daleks being evil as [[InTheBlood overwhelmingly determined by their genes]].
** "The Doctor's Daughter" is one of those anti-violence, anti-gun, and anti-murder stories. The problem is, it calls the Doctor "the man who never would". And while refraining from shooting the man who'd killed Jenny is admirable, the "never would" part is only true when applied to firing the gun-- violence and cold-blooded murder are things the audience already knows the Doctor is capable of, and will continue to be.
** "Journey's End" is yet another and even worse example of the series trying to suggest that the Doctor's attitude to the Daleks is FantasticRacism while still depicting them as AlwaysChaoticEvil. The Doctor treats his clone as wrong for wiping out the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity they're back next series]]), saying it shows how violent and brutal he is. Yet the Daleks had just come very close to wiping out entire Universes and are fictions poster creature for ScaryDogmaticAliens. The Doctor had temporarily incapacitated them but considering how resourceful they are it was unlikely they would have remained like that for long. The moral makes even less sense considering that 10 in the same series had basically done the same thing to a race that wasn't as dangerous as the Daleks and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, even if this was what history decreed. Meanwhile his clone was only wiping out the Daleks and ([[JokerImmunity possibly]]) their OmnicidalManiac Creator Davros, who refused a chance to be saved by the Doctor. Not only that but when the Doctor declined a chance to destroy the last Dalek in their previous appearance, claiming there has been too much death today, that Dalek had escaped and caused the problems of this episode. Not only that but that Dalek had been responsible for most of the deaths, killing the Dalek-Humans that numbered over a thousand because they were not Dalek enough.

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** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E4TheFaceOfEvil The Face of Evil" Evil]]" is based on the premise that the Doctor's egotistical attempts to save a space mission AI (by simply imposing a print of his own brain over it instead of actually fixing the problem) led to the AI becoming an insane God who selectively breeds the settlers into opposing CargoCult factions that worship him, and creating a dystopic {{Egopolis}} based on the Doctor's image. It all seems like it's set up to criticise the Doctor's big ego and ChronicHeroSyndrome... but it ends with the AI, having realised who it is, asking the Doctor for an explanation as to where he went wrong, absolving the Doctor of all responsibility and even having 'God' ask him for tips on how to be better. Striking because the new series absolutely would ''never'' have missed the opportunity to criticise the Doctor's god complex.
** "The Sunmakers" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers]]" is supposed to be a right-wing allegory about how taxation is bad, written by an openly Conservative writer. However, ignoring a few throwaway flippant comments made by the Doctor, the story is really about the evil of taxation that targets the poorest in society, and societies that strip away social safety nets so the untaxed rich can rake in massive profits. The reason for this situation is privatisation, where every utility (including sunlight) is run by corporate interests and the government is viewed only as an extension of the MegaCorp. At the very least, it comes across as left-wing in an Occupy kind of way. If you choose to read into the fact that the Doctor wins by inspiring a populist revolt to execute their leaders while quoting Karl Marx, it becomes actively ''Communist''. Not what you'd expect from something written by a Margaret Thatcher supporter in 1977.
** The character of Whizzkid in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E4TheGreatestShowInTheGalaxy "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E4TheGreatestShowInTheGalaxy The Greatest Show in the Galaxy]]'' Galaxy]]" was intended as a TakeThat to fans who criticised 80s Doctor Who by saying it wasn't as good as it used to be in a time they couldn't possibly remember. The problem here is that Whizzkid's similar opinions about the titular Psychic Circus are shown to be absolutely correct. Consequently, all Whizzkid does is vindicate the same fans the character was supposed to be chastising.
** In the episode "Dalek", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E6Dalek Dalek]]", while the Doctor is certainly being unpleasant in torturing the Lone Dalek, he is treated as wrong for wanting to kill the Dalek and treating it as absolutely evil. However when the Dalek gets free it kills hundreds of people and it is clear it intends to wipe out all humanity. It does gain human feelings but is clearly an exception and Rose's sympathy towards it is largely born from ignorance, while the Doctor knows first-hand how dangerous the Daleks are and is proved right.
** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E13ThePartingOfTheWays The Parting of the Ways" Ways]]" has the Ninth Doctor decline from destroying Earth to destroy the Daleks, claiming that it's the morally better choice to not wipe out humanity with the Daleks. However the Daleks have just attacked Earth with such force they have distorted continents, meaning they have probably wiped out at least nearly all humanity and any survivors will soon be either killed, enslaved or turned into Daleks, which is clearly a FateWorseThanDeath, the Dalek Emperor even saying humanity will be harvested. The Doctor even points out that humanity won't be wiped out with Earth as they have spread to other worlds by now, "You're the only Daleks in existence. The whole universe is in danger if I let you live". But the Daleks surviving means they'll attack other worlds, giving humanity even less of a chance. It's only a literal DeusExMachina that saves possibly the Universe from the Daleks. Overall the Doctor's decision, considering he may well be the only non-Dalek in range of the delta wave and the Daleks are about to exterminate him anyway, looks quite odd.
** This seems to be a general problem with Dalek stories in New Who, as "Daleks In Manhattan"[=/=]"Evolution "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E4DaleksInManhattan Daleks in Manhattan]]" / "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E5EvolutionOfTheDaleks Evolution of the Daleks" Daleks]]" tries to be a story entirely themed around the evils of racism, while still blatantly depicting humans and Time Lords being good and Daleks being evil as [[InTheBlood overwhelmingly determined by their genes]].
** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter The Doctor's Daughter" Daughter]]" is one of those anti-violence, anti-gun, and anti-murder stories. The problem is, it calls the Doctor "the man who never would". And while refraining from shooting the man who'd killed Jenny is admirable, the "never would" part is only true when applied to firing the gun-- violence and cold-blooded murder are things the audience already knows the Doctor is capable of, and will continue to be.
** "Journey's End" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]" is yet another and even worse example of the series trying to suggest that the Doctor's attitude to the Daleks is FantasticRacism while still depicting them as AlwaysChaoticEvil. The Doctor treats his clone as wrong for wiping out the Daleks ([[JokerImmunity they're back next series]]), saying it shows how violent and brutal he is. Yet the Daleks had just come very close to wiping out entire Universes and are fictions poster creature for ScaryDogmaticAliens. The Doctor had temporarily incapacitated them but considering how resourceful they are it was unlikely they would have remained like that for long. The moral makes even less sense considering that 10 in the same series had basically done the same thing to a race that wasn't as dangerous as the Daleks and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, even if this was what history decreed. Meanwhile his clone was only wiping out the Daleks and ([[JokerImmunity possibly]]) their OmnicidalManiac Creator Davros, who refused a chance to be saved by the Doctor. Not only that but when the Doctor declined a chance to destroy the last Dalek in their previous appearance, claiming there has been too much death today, that Dalek had escaped and caused the problems of this episode. Not only that but that Dalek had been responsible for most of the deaths, killing the Dalek-Humans that numbered over a thousand because they were not Dalek enough.



** The two-parters story "The Rebel Flesh/ The Almost People" is about a rebellion of clones who are [[CloningBlues sick of being treated as disposable vessels]] by miners to operate in dangerous circumstances. The Doctor even sides with them saying ClonesArePeopleToo and try his best to save them. At the end of the day, the Doctor reveals to his companions the reason of their visit to the factory: [[TomatoInTheMirror Amy has been replaced with a clone all along]]. The Doctor ''immediately '' [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman kills Amy's clone]] with his sonic screwdriver as if nothing in the last few hours ever happened. The problem is lessened a bit in that Amy's clone appeared to just be remotely controlled by the real Amy, but it's still a matter of how sure was the Doctor that it hadn't been gaining sentience like the others.

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** The two-parters story "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E5TheRebelFlesh The Rebel Flesh/ Flesh]] / [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheAlmostPeople The Almost People" People]]" is about a rebellion of clones who are [[CloningBlues sick of being treated as disposable vessels]] by miners to operate in dangerous circumstances. The Doctor even sides with them saying ClonesArePeopleToo and try his best to save them. At the end of the day, the Doctor reveals to his companions the reason of their visit to the factory: [[TomatoInTheMirror Amy has been replaced with a clone all along]]. The Doctor ''immediately '' [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman kills Amy's clone]] with his sonic screwdriver as if nothing in the last few hours ever happened. The problem is lessened a bit in that Amy's clone appeared to just be remotely controlled by the real Amy, but it's still a matter of how sure was the Doctor that it hadn't been gaining sentience like the others.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=BrokenAesop.LiveActionTV