History BrokenAesop / Literature

30th Nov '16 1:35:45 AM morane
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* The aesop of "The North Wind and Sun". The true lesson is ''not'' that benevolence (sunshine) is a better way to get along with people than outright hostility (north wind), but that indirect and subtle attacks work usually better than all-out assaults.
25th Nov '16 10:36:49 AM Malady
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* The main antagonists in ''Guardians of Ga'Hoole'' are Nazi expies whose belief that certain species are superior to others (barn owls specifically being the peak of evolution, and everyone else's rightful leaders) appalls every heroic character. ''But'', the owl version of [[TheChosenOne King Arthur]], who's destined to rule all owls and usher in a golden age, is always incarnated as a barn owl. And his uncle of the same species inherits the crown later. And TheHero leading a group of other owls just happens to be the only barn owl among them (and the one who initiated [[TheCall their quest]]). So all those coincidences come off less as 'No race is any better or worse than another' than 'Non-Aryans can't do anything without the guidance and virtue of Aryans'. The heroic barn owls just have more ''noblesse oblige''.

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* The main antagonists in ''Guardians of Ga'Hoole'' ''Literature/GuardiansOfGaHoole'' are Nazi expies whose belief that certain species are superior to others (barn owls specifically being the peak of evolution, and everyone else's rightful leaders) appalls every heroic character. ''But'', the owl version of [[TheChosenOne King Arthur]], who's destined to rule all owls and usher in a golden age, is always incarnated as a barn owl. And his uncle of the same species inherits the crown later. And TheHero leading a group of other owls just happens to be the only barn owl among them (and the one who initiated [[TheCall their quest]]). So all those coincidences come off less as 'No race is any better or worse than another' than 'Non-Aryans can't do anything without the guidance and virtue of Aryans'. The heroic barn owls just have more ''noblesse oblige''.
25th Nov '16 8:27:28 AM Argon2
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** The other Aesop of the book is supposed to be about a woman discovering her sexuality and enjoying it. Completely broken by the fact that Anastasia knew ''nothing'' about sex before Christian slept with her, she does not know how to express her desires in words, often referring to her private areas as 'down there' and 'back there' and can only properly admit to herself that she is feeling horny by referring to her Inner Goddess, a mental person of hers who is the epitome of [[SlutShaming a perpetually horny woman]]. Her views on sex are extremely limited, considering it dirty and disgusting, unless one is absolutely in love with the partner. She often shames people, who have casual sex, mentally, including her best friend Kate. Anastasia's discovery of BDSM is not properly done, she is not taught anything, does not understand safe words, and she is actively scared of majority of what BDSM entails. The Aesop is less 'a woman discovers her sexuality and enjoys it' and more 'a woman submits to the old {{lie back and think of England}} trope'.

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** The other Aesop of the book is supposed to be about a woman discovering her sexuality and enjoying it. Completely broken by the fact that Anastasia knew ''nothing'' about sex before Christian slept with her, she does not know how to express her desires in words, often referring to her private areas as 'down there' and 'back there' and can only properly admit to herself that she is feeling horny by referring to her Inner Goddess, a mental person of hers who is the epitome of [[SlutShaming a perpetually horny woman]]. Her views on woman]] and she considers sex are extremely limited, considering it dirty and disgusting, unless one is absolutely in love with the partner. She often shames people, who have casual sex, sex mentally, including her best friend Kate. Anastasia's discovery of BDSM is not properly done, she is not taught anything, does not understand safe words, and she is actively scared of majority of what BDSM entails. The Aesop is less 'a woman discovers her sexuality and enjoys it' and more 'a woman submits to the old {{lie back and think of England}} trope'.



* The main antagonists in ''Guardians of Ga'Hoole'' are Nazi expies whose belief that certain species are superior to others (barn owls specifically being the peak of evolution, and everyone else's rightful leaders) appalls every heroic character. ''But'', the owl version of [[TheChosenOne King Arthur]], who's destined to rule all owls and usher in a golden age, is always incarnated as a barn owl. And his uncle of the same species inherits the crown later. And TheHero leading a group of other owls just happens to be the only barn owl among them (and the one who initiated [[TheCall their quest]]). So all those coincidences come off less as 'No race is any better or worse than another' than 'Non-Aryans can't do anything without the guidance and virtue of Aryans'. The heroic barn owls just have more ''noblesse oblige''.



** Another theme is the PowerOfLove conquering all. You have Lily's sacrifice, Snape being GoodAfterAll because of love, platonic love saves the day all the time... and then there's Dumbledore. WordOfGod says he was [[InformedGay in love with Gellert Grindewald,]] who also happened to be known as the most powerful Dark Wizard of his time. The crush eventually culminates in a duel which kills Dumbledore's sister and starts Grindewald's career as a Dark revolutionary. Did I mention that Dumbledore is also the [[TokenGay only gay character in the series?]] So the Power Of Love saves the day in most cases... unless you're gay, in which case, well, [[UnfortunateImplications bad news, kiddos.]]
2nd Nov '16 11:48:43 AM StarTropes
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** Another theme is the [[PowerOfLove]] conquering all. You have Lily's sacrifice, Snape being [[GoodAfterAll]] because of love, platonic love saves the day all the time... and then there's Dumbledore. [[WordOfGod]] says he was [[InformedGay in love with Gellert Grindewald,]] who also happened to be known as the most powerful Dark Wizard of his time. The crush eventually culminates in a duel which kills Dumbledore's sister and starts Grindewald's career as a Dark revolutionary. Did I mention that Dumbledore is also the [[TokenGay only gay character in the series?]] So the Power Of Love saves the day in most cases... unless you're gay, in which case, well, [[UnfortunateImplications bad news, kiddos.]]

to:

** Another theme is the [[PowerOfLove]] PowerOfLove conquering all. You have Lily's sacrifice, Snape being [[GoodAfterAll]] GoodAfterAll because of love, platonic love saves the day all the time... and then there's Dumbledore. [[WordOfGod]] WordOfGod says he was [[InformedGay in love with Gellert Grindewald,]] who also happened to be known as the most powerful Dark Wizard of his time. The crush eventually culminates in a duel which kills Dumbledore's sister and starts Grindewald's career as a Dark revolutionary. Did I mention that Dumbledore is also the [[TokenGay only gay character in the series?]] So the Power Of Love saves the day in most cases... unless you're gay, in which case, well, [[UnfortunateImplications bad news, kiddos.]]
30th Oct '16 5:30:00 PM Dere
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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'': The series is largely centered around the message of unity and tolerance. Specifically, unity and tolerance between pure-blood and half-blood wizards. Discrimination and segregation between them are always depicted as wrong. It also has the bad guys seeking to enslave non-magical people (aka Muggles) as an analogue to Nazism. This would all be fine and dandy, if it weren't for the fact that wizards (even the good ones) are highly guilty of separatism and segregation by hiding themselves and their society from Muggles and rejecting their culture (the reason wizards are still stuck with medieval technology is that they're largely ignorant of modern technology and science due to their rejection of anything "Muggle"), and the books never portray this behavior as being wrong. Okay, being fair, many wizards believe in Muggles' rights, and some have an interest in Muggle culture, and they have a class called Muggle Studies dedicated to it. But in those cases, this is done in an incredibly condescending way, almost as if dealing with an animal species, and it's never done with the intention of integration. In other words, being a promoter of Muggle rights practically makes you the wizard of equivalent a PETA activist. Consider how Ron's father's job is specifically to study Muggle culture but still has to ask Harry what the point of a rubber duck is and that the existence of wizards with fully Muggle parents means that they don't even need to leave their veil to get most of the info they could ever need to see how seriously they honestly take it..

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'': The series is largely centered around the message of unity and tolerance. Specifically, unity and tolerance between pure-blood and half-blood wizards. Discrimination and segregation between them are always depicted as wrong. It also has the bad guys seeking to kill or enslave non-magical non-wizard people (aka Muggles) as an analogue to Nazism. This would all be fine and dandy, if it weren't for the fact that wizards (even ―even the good ones) ones― are highly guilty of separatism and segregation by hiding themselves and their society from Muggles and rejecting their culture (the reason wizards are still stuck with medieval technology is that they're largely ignorant of modern technology and science due to their rejection of anything "Muggle"), and the books never portray this behavior as being wrong. Okay, being fair, many wizards believe in Muggles' rights, and some have an interest in Muggle culture, and they have a class study called Muggle Studies dedicated to it. But in those cases, this is done in an incredibly condescending way, manner, almost as if dealing with an animal species, and it's never done with the intention objective of integration. In other words, being a promoter of Muggle rights practically makes you the wizard of equivalent a PETA activist. Consider how Ron's father's job is specifically to study Muggle culture but still has to ask Harry what the point of a rubber duck is and that the existence of wizards with fully Muggle parents means that they don't even need to leave their veil to get most of the info they could ever need to see how seriously they honestly take it..it.
23rd Oct '16 9:48:43 PM sweatergoth
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** Another theme is the [[PowerOfLove]] conquering all. You have Lily's sacrifice, Snape being [[GoodAfterAll]] because of love, platonic love saves the day all the time... and then there's Dumbledore. [[WordOfGod]] says he was [[InformedGay in love with Gellert Grindewald,]] who also happened to be known as the most powerful Dark Wizard of his time. The crush eventually culminates in a duel which kills Dumbledore's sister and starts Grindewald's career as a Dark revolutionary. Did I mention that Dumbledore is also the [[TokenGay only gay character in the series?]] So the Power Of Love saves the day in most cases... unless you're gay, in which case, well, [[UnfortunateImplications bad news, kiddos.]]
18th Sep '16 8:38:49 PM DrOO7
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* Several times in the ''Literature/NancyDrew Files'' series, Nancy is blasted for her snooping not just by the people she's investigating, but by her friends and her father. Problem is, not only does Nancy turn out to be right about the people she was suspicious of (while not guilty, they were involved somehow), in one book, boyfriend Ned gets so angry at her that he breaks up with her, but in the next book, he asks her to help his new girlfriend. Apparently, Nancy's meddling is only bad when it affects him. When he needs her help, it's perfectly fine--she herself points out his hypocrisy.
15th Sep '16 3:37:50 PM PugBuddies
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*** Throughout the books, the message of friendship and putting aside differences is hammered pretty hard; Malfoy is portrayed as a self-righteous {{Jerkass}} for warning Harry about befriending "the wrong sort," and the series' PowerTrio is made up of three students from radically different backgrounds. The aesop is shattered to pieces, however, by the way Slytherins are treated: Dumbledore reverses their victory, giving the House Cup to their bitter rivals in full view of the entire school; when Harry, disguised as a Slytherin student, asks another student for directions, she flat refuses, primly claiming "''I'm'' a Ravenclaw" before walking off with her nose in the air; Gryffindors "hate Slytherins on principle"; and so on. And all of this loathing is portrayed as 100 percent justified (and even commendable) in-universe, and every halfway decent Slytherin has a DarkAndTroubledPast that they never quite managed to rise above. So, a more accurate aesop might be: "Make friends with people who are different from you.... [[IronicEcho so long as they're not the wrong sort]]."



** Throughout the books, the message of friendship and putting aside differences is hammered pretty hard; Malfoy is portrayed as a self-righteous {{Jerkass}} for warning Harry about befriending "the wrong sort," and the series' PowerTrio is made up of three students from radically different backgrounds. The aesop is shattered to pieces, however, by the way Slytherin is treated: Dumbledore reverses their victory, giving the House Cup to their bitter rivals in full view of the entire school; when Harry, disguised as a Slytherin student, asks another student for directions, she flat refuses, primly claiming "''I'm'' a Ravenclaw" before walking off with her nose in the air; Gryffindors "hate Slytherins on principle"; and so on. And all of this hatred is portrayed as 100 percent justified in-universe, and every halfway decent Slytherin has a DarkAndTroubledPast that they never quite managed to rise above, not to mention ''many'' Jerkass moments. So, a more accurate aesop might be: "Make friends with people who are different from you.... [[IronicEcho so long as they're not the wrong sort]]."
15th Sep '16 3:31:47 PM PugBuddies
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Added DiffLines:

** Throughout the books, the message of friendship and putting aside differences is hammered pretty hard; Malfoy is portrayed as a self-righteous {{Jerkass}} for warning Harry about befriending "the wrong sort," and the series' PowerTrio is made up of three students from radically different backgrounds. The aesop is shattered to pieces, however, by the way Slytherin is treated: Dumbledore reverses their victory, giving the House Cup to their bitter rivals in full view of the entire school; when Harry, disguised as a Slytherin student, asks another student for directions, she flat refuses, primly claiming "''I'm'' a Ravenclaw" before walking off with her nose in the air; Gryffindors "hate Slytherins on principle"; and so on. And all of this hatred is portrayed as 100 percent justified in-universe, and every halfway decent Slytherin has a DarkAndTroubledPast that they never quite managed to rise above, not to mention ''many'' Jerkass moments. So, a more accurate aesop might be: "Make friends with people who are different from you.... [[IronicEcho so long as they're not the wrong sort]]."
8th Sep '16 7:03:52 PM Malady
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* In-universe example: In ''The Barsoom Project'', sequel to ''Literature/DreamPark'', a live-action adventure about Inuit mythology is re-staged as a "Fat Ripper", in which players are psychologically conditioned to overcome their eating disorders and other dependencies while completing their mission. This could've been a real coup for the Park's operators, if one of the game's challenges hadn't required them to ''smoke cigarettes'' as part of a magical ritual. So we're training Gamers to trade one unhealthy habit for another, are we?

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* In-universe example: In ''The Barsoom Project'', ''Literature/TheBarsoomProject'', sequel to ''Literature/DreamPark'', a live-action adventure about Inuit mythology is re-staged as a "Fat Ripper", in which players are psychologically conditioned to overcome their eating disorders and other dependencies while completing their mission. This could've been a real coup for the Park's operators, if one of the game's challenges hadn't required them to ''smoke cigarettes'' as part of a magical ritual. So we're training Gamers to trade one unhealthy habit for another, are we?



* The original ''Beauty and the Beast'' story by Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve actually contains this. After the Beast's curse is broken and he has returned to human form, his mother returns home and is indignant that he married Beauty and refuses to acknowledge her, because Beauty is not royalty or nobility. The woman who cursed the Beast sees this and tells the mother what a horrible person she is for being so narrow-minded and refusing to see Beauty as the one who broke the curse on her son... and ''then'' reveals out of nowhere that [[AssPull Beauty is actually of royal birth, who was placed to be raised by a merchant and is actually]] [[HalfHumanHybrid part-fairy]], making the mother's refusal pointless and ruin the idea that love is more important than one's birth.

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* The original ''Beauty and the Beast'' ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' story by Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve actually contains this. After the Beast's curse is broken and he has returned to human form, his mother returns home and is indignant that he married Beauty and refuses to acknowledge her, because Beauty is not royalty or nobility. The woman who cursed the Beast sees this and tells the mother what a horrible person she is for being so narrow-minded and refusing to see Beauty as the one who broke the curse on her son... and ''then'' reveals out of nowhere that [[AssPull Beauty is actually of royal birth, who was placed to be raised by a merchant and is actually]] [[HalfHumanHybrid part-fairy]], making the mother's refusal pointless and ruin the idea that love is more important than one's birth.



* The Dutch book ''The Chatroom Trap'' tries to convey the Aesop that Chatrooms are dangerous place for underage users, by having Floor and Marcia, two 15 years old girls, doing a lot of dumb things in chatroom, culminating in Marcia posing naked for various persons. The catch is, all of this has no negative consequences whatsoever (even Marcia's naked photos are kept in private). Instead, the reason the girls are targeted by the criminals (which leads to them being molested) is that they post their profile on a (legit) site for aspiring models, with the entire baiting process happening via E-Mails.

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* The Dutch book ''The Chatroom Trap'' ''Literature/TheChatroomTrap'' tries to convey the Aesop that Chatrooms are dangerous place for underage users, by having Floor and Marcia, two 15 years old girls, doing a lot of dumb things in chatroom, culminating in Marcia posing naked for various persons. The catch is, all of this has no negative consequences whatsoever (even Marcia's naked photos are kept in private). Instead, the reason the girls are targeted by the criminals (which leads to them being molested) is that they post their profile on a (legit) site for aspiring models, with the entire baiting process happening via E-Mails.



* The aesop of "The Tortoise and The Hare" is "Slow And Steady Wins The Race". While "slow and steady" is certainly a good approach for a number of things, racing is ''not'' one of them even in the story. The tortoise did not win because he was going slow and steady. He clearly won because of the hare stopping to rest. The aesop can more accurately be described as "Don't Be Cocky." Or even more so "Whatever you do, do with all your might". As Lore Sjöberg put it, "Slow and steady wins the race if your opponent is narcoleptic".

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* The aesop of "The Tortoise and The Hare" "Literature/TheTortoiseAndTheHare" is "Slow And Steady Wins The Race". While "slow and steady" is certainly a good approach for a number of things, racing is ''not'' one of them even in the story. The tortoise did not win because he was going slow and steady. He clearly won because of the hare stopping to rest. The aesop can more accurately be described as "Don't Be Cocky." Or even more so "Whatever you do, do with all your might". As Lore Sjöberg put it, "Slow and steady wins the race if your opponent is narcoleptic".



* The four book series ''The Dreamers'' has a powerful one at the end. The series appears to build on the Aesop that the gods are supposed to barely affect people and use their powers sparingly and let things go naturally; so, after the gods are given children, [[spoiler:who are their replacements]], who are said to be able to save the world, they collect people from around the planet to help them fight off a HiveMind force of super insects. How is the Aesop broken? During the last two chapters of the last book, [[spoiler:the new gods in turn go back in time, render the original Hive Mother infertile, and give the man who almost single-handedly won the war because the loss of his wife caused him not to care about dying and made him want unending revenge his wife back. All this actively Unmakes all four books, and the main character's life is removed from existence. ]] Now, that is first-class meddling!
* Literature/EightCousins criticizes adventure books where, supposedly, boy protagonists become rich by finding a treasure or get adopted by a millionaire because he happened to find and return the millionaire's purse. [[MoralGuardians Why can't we have wholesome books that teach children the value of hard work?]] Fair enough, but Literature/EightCousins itself has a heroine who is a rich heiress through no action of her own, and she "adopts" a poor orphan girl as her sister just because she sings beautifully and delivered an encouraging talk to the protagonist. "Write as I say, not as I write"?

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* The four book series ''The Dreamers'' ''Literature/TheDreamers'' has a powerful one at the end. The series appears to build on the Aesop that the gods are supposed to barely affect people and use their powers sparingly and let things go naturally; so, after the gods are given children, [[spoiler:who are their replacements]], who are said to be able to save the world, they collect people from around the planet to help them fight off a HiveMind force of super insects. How is the Aesop broken? During the last two chapters of the last book, [[spoiler:the new gods in turn go back in time, render the original Hive Mother infertile, and give the man who almost single-handedly won the war because the loss of his wife caused him not to care about dying and made him want unending revenge his wife back. All this actively Unmakes all four books, and the main character's life is removed from existence. ]] Now, that is first-class meddling!
* Literature/EightCousins ''Literature/EightCousins'' criticizes adventure books where, supposedly, boy protagonists become rich by finding a treasure or get adopted by a millionaire because he happened to find and return the millionaire's purse. [[MoralGuardians Why can't we have wholesome books that teach children the value of hard work?]] Fair enough, but Literature/EightCousins itself has a heroine who is a rich heiress through no action of her own, and she "adopts" a poor orphan girl as her sister just because she sings beautifully and delivered an encouraging talk to the protagonist. "Write as I say, not as I write"?



* Kevin J. Anderson arguably did this ''well'' in ''Hopscotch''. One of the parallel story threads follows a girl who joins an increasingly abusive cult whose founder is obsessed with the idea of sharing everything--this being a soft sci-fi story, this includes [[FreakyFridayFlip sharing bodies]]. [[spoiler:The group is quickly set up to be "bad," and the girl is forced out of it and forced to leave her original body behind. She finds another leader-type to follow, a fellow who claims that body-swapping is bad and should never be practiced, and he gets a lengthy CharacterFilibuster on the subject. The astute reader might notice that this moral is actively contradicted in the other story threads, so it seems like a broken aesop. Later on, however, she discovers that her original body is dead, and gets to decide whether or not to trade for a body similar, but not identical, to the one she had. For a few seconds, she considers which choice would be more in line with the precepts she's adopted--then she realizes that she's still blindly doing whatever she's told, and for the first time in the book, she makes her decision based on her own instincts rather than someone else's advice.]]

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* Kevin J. Anderson arguably did this ''well'' in ''Hopscotch''.''Literature/{{Hopscotch}}''. One of the parallel story threads follows a girl who joins an increasingly abusive cult whose founder is obsessed with the idea of sharing everything--this being a soft sci-fi story, this includes [[FreakyFridayFlip sharing bodies]]. [[spoiler:The group is quickly set up to be "bad," and the girl is forced out of it and forced to leave her original body behind. She finds another leader-type to follow, a fellow who claims that body-swapping is bad and should never be practiced, and he gets a lengthy CharacterFilibuster on the subject. The astute reader might notice that this moral is actively contradicted in the other story threads, so it seems like a broken aesop. Later on, however, she discovers that her original body is dead, and gets to decide whether or not to trade for a body similar, but not identical, to the one she had. For a few seconds, she considers which choice would be more in line with the precepts she's adopted--then she realizes that she's still blindly doing whatever she's told, and for the first time in the book, she makes her decision based on her own instincts rather than someone else's advice.]]



* The book ''Lady in Waiting'' states first that a single woman was encouraged to pursue a doctorate, and that the spirit-filled woman is interesting and has goals for herself. But later it says that seeking fulfillment through a career is wrong and that a single woman should only seek fulfillment in serving God in whatever way, method, location, and time God wants.

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* The book ''Lady in Waiting'' ''Literature/LadyInWaiting'' states first that a single woman was encouraged to pursue a doctorate, and that the spirit-filled woman is interesting and has goals for herself. But later it says that seeking fulfillment through a career is wrong and that a single woman should only seek fulfillment in serving God in whatever way, method, location, and time God wants.



* In Martin Lake's ''A Love Most Dangerous,'' which focuses on a fictional mistress of Henry VIII, the Aesop is supposed to be "Be true to yourself and you will be happy." Fine--except that Alice Petherton ''is'' happy at the beginning before she is stalked and nearly raped by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Rich,_1st_Baron_Rich#Chancellor Sir Richard Rich]]. Even her threat [[EyeScream to stick a pin in his eye]] doesn't stop him for long, and no matter who she goes to for help, no one will lift a finger against Rich. Alice then gets involved with the king (on the grounds that he will be able to protect her from Rich, who is very powerful), and all goes swimmingly until [[spoiler:she begs Henry to spare a man whom Henry had condemned to death for following his own orders]]. As a result, Henry banishes her from the palace, and Rich takes advantage of the situation in a vicious way. At the end, Alice is back at court, back in the king's favor (having decided to be much more agreeable and never contradict the king) and is finally profiting from being the king's mistress. So the real moral seems to be "Always tell men exactly what they want to hear, because if you refuse them or contradict them, they will hurt you."
* The Scottish childen's book ''Max Power and the Bagpipes'' is about a family who run a wind farm, intended to provide the GreenAesop that renewable energy is awesome ... except that in order to provide a story, the ''actual'' message becomes "wind power is chancy and unreliable, unless you have magic bagpipes that can make the wind blow harder".

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* In Martin Lake's ''A Love Most Dangerous,'' ''Literature/ALoveMostDangerous,'' which focuses on a fictional mistress of Henry VIII, the Aesop is supposed to be "Be true to yourself and you will be happy." Fine--except that Alice Petherton ''is'' happy at the beginning before she is stalked and nearly raped by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Rich,_1st_Baron_Rich#Chancellor Sir Richard Rich]]. Even her threat [[EyeScream to stick a pin in his eye]] doesn't stop him for long, and no matter who she goes to for help, no one will lift a finger against Rich. Alice then gets involved with the king (on the grounds that he will be able to protect her from Rich, who is very powerful), and all goes swimmingly until [[spoiler:she begs Henry to spare a man whom Henry had condemned to death for following his own orders]]. As a result, Henry banishes her from the palace, and Rich takes advantage of the situation in a vicious way. At the end, Alice is back at court, back in the king's favor (having decided to be much more agreeable and never contradict the king) and is finally profiting from being the king's mistress. So the real moral seems to be "Always tell men exactly what they want to hear, because if you refuse them or contradict them, they will hurt you."
* The Scottish childen's book ''Max Power and the Bagpipes'' ''Literature/MaxPowerAndTheBagpipes'' is about a family who run a wind farm, intended to provide the GreenAesop that renewable energy is awesome ... except that in order to provide a story, the ''actual'' message becomes "wind power is chancy and unreliable, unless you have magic bagpipes that can make the wind blow harder".



* ''Race Against Time'' by Creator/PiersAnthony attempts AnAesop on how having a lot of different cultures is a good thing, but it gets broken by a moral on how you shouldn't mix romantically with other races.

to:

* ''Race Against Time'' ''Literature/RaceAgainstTime'' by Creator/PiersAnthony attempts AnAesop on how having a lot of different cultures is a good thing, but it gets broken by a moral on how you shouldn't mix romantically with other races.



* HarryPotter: The series is largely centered around the message of unity and tolerance. Specifically, unity and tolerance between pure-blood and half-blood wizards. Discrimination and segregation between them are always depicted as wrong. It also has the bad guys seeking to enslave non-magical people (aka Muggles) as an analogue to Nazism. This would all be fine and dandy, if it weren't for the fact that wizards (even the good ones) are highly guilty of separatism and segregation by hiding themselves and their society from Muggles and rejecting their culture (the reason wizards are still stuck with medieval technology is that they're largely ignorant of modern technology and science due to their rejection of anything "Muggle"), and the books never portray this behavior as being wrong. Okay, being fair, many wizards believe in Muggles' rights, and some have an interest in Muggle culture, and they have a class called Muggle Studies dedicated to it. But in those cases, this is done in an incredibly condescending way, almost as if dealing with an animal species, and it's never done with the intention of integration. In other words, being a promoter of Muggle rights practically makes you the wizard of equivalent a PETA activist. Consider how Ron's father's job is specifically to study Muggle culture but still has to ask Harry what the point of a rubber duck is and that the existence of wizards with fully Muggle parents means that they don't even need to leave their veil to get most of the info they could ever need to see how seriously they honestly take it..

to:

* HarryPotter: ''Literature/HarryPotter'': The series is largely centered around the message of unity and tolerance. Specifically, unity and tolerance between pure-blood and half-blood wizards. Discrimination and segregation between them are always depicted as wrong. It also has the bad guys seeking to enslave non-magical people (aka Muggles) as an analogue to Nazism. This would all be fine and dandy, if it weren't for the fact that wizards (even the good ones) are highly guilty of separatism and segregation by hiding themselves and their society from Muggles and rejecting their culture (the reason wizards are still stuck with medieval technology is that they're largely ignorant of modern technology and science due to their rejection of anything "Muggle"), and the books never portray this behavior as being wrong. Okay, being fair, many wizards believe in Muggles' rights, and some have an interest in Muggle culture, and they have a class called Muggle Studies dedicated to it. But in those cases, this is done in an incredibly condescending way, almost as if dealing with an animal species, and it's never done with the intention of integration. In other words, being a promoter of Muggle rights practically makes you the wizard of equivalent a PETA activist. Consider how Ron's father's job is specifically to study Muggle culture but still has to ask Harry what the point of a rubber duck is and that the existence of wizards with fully Muggle parents means that they don't even need to leave their veil to get most of the info they could ever need to see how seriously they honestly take it..
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