History Blog / TetrapodZoology

25th Aug '15 4:03:15 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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The blog started out on [[http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/ Blogspot]] in 2006, then moved to [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/ Scienceblogs]] in 2007. In 2011, it moved to [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/ Scientific American]]. Naish also made the majority of his technical papers (several of which were covered on his blog) freely available [[http://darrennaish.wordpress.com/publications/ from here]].

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The blog started out on [[http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/ Blogspot]] in 2006, then moved to [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/ Scienceblogs]] in 2007. In 2011, it moved to [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/ Scientific American]]. Naish also made the majority of his technical papers (several of which were covered on his blog) freely available [[http://darrennaish.wordpress.com/publications/ from here]].
25th Aug '15 3:41:32 AM albertonykus
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* NeverSmileAtACrocodile: Somewhat averted, as the frugivory in alligators (and caiman) post shows.

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* NeverSmileAtACrocodile: Somewhat averted, as the frugivory in alligators (and caiman) post shows. Played straight, however, in the post about [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/tool-use-in-crocodylians-crocodiles-and-alligators-use-sticks-as-lures-to-attract-waterbirds/ crocodylians using sticks to lure waterbirds to their deaths]].
23rd Aug '15 6:13:01 PM Adept
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* MorallyAmbiguousDucktorate: Waterfowl are another of Naish's favorite tetrapod groups and are frequently covered. Topics that fit this trope include the [[http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/2006/05/make-that-ten-most-beautifully.html aggression of steamer ducks]], [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/03/23/duck-sex-to-interfere-or-not/ gang rape behavior in ducks]], [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/06/19/death-by-toxic-goose/ the retention of toxins in goose flesh]] (and subsequent poisoning of unfortunate individuals), [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/06/24/when-hornbills-bite/ whether or not waterfowl bites can break human skin]] (fortunately, most cannot, as it turns out), etc.
4th Aug '15 5:22:15 PM Adept
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* FrogsAndToads: Even among tetrapods, Naish appears to be quite fond of these. An ongoing series (since 2007) aims to cover all extant anuran groups.
19th Apr '15 4:45:19 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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'''''[[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/ Tetrapod Zoology]]''''' is a blog by paleontologist and zoologist Dr. Darren Naish that covers varied topics regarding tetrapods (mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians both extinct and extant). It is widely considered one of the best (if not ''the'' best) zoological blogs in the blogosphere, for although Naish is a dinosaur paleontologist by profession, he maintains a healthy interest in tetrapods of all kinds and his knowledge on them can border on almost-terrifying levels. Due to the blog's diverse content as well as its frequent coverage of [[SeldomSeenSpecies obscure tetrapods]] and [[MundaneMadeAwesome obscure facts on well-known tetrapods]], readers are almost ''guaranteed'' to learn something new. Unusually for the Internet, the comment sections on the blog are often just as valuable and informative as the blog posts themselves due to a tendency for readers (as well as Naish himself) to provide additional information and discussions in the comments. It also has a podcast, which is found, with John Conway, [[http://tetzoo.com/ here]]. There's also [[https://twitter.com/TetZoo a Twitter feed]].

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'''''[[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/ Tetrapod Zoology]]''''' is a blog by British paleontologist and zoologist Dr. Darren Naish that covers varied topics regarding tetrapods (mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians both extinct and extant). It is widely considered one of the best (if not ''the'' best) zoological blogs in the blogosphere, for although Naish is a dinosaur paleontologist by profession, he maintains a healthy interest in tetrapods of all kinds and his knowledge on them can border on almost-terrifying levels. Due to the blog's diverse content as well as its frequent coverage of [[SeldomSeenSpecies obscure tetrapods]] and [[MundaneMadeAwesome obscure facts on well-known tetrapods]], readers are almost ''guaranteed'' to learn something new. Unusually for the Internet, the comment sections on the blog are often just as valuable and informative as the blog posts themselves due to a tendency for readers (as well as Naish himself) to provide additional information and discussions in the comments. It also has a podcast, which is found, with John Conway, [[http://tetzoo.com/ here]]. There's also [[https://twitter.com/TetZoo a Twitter feed]].
17th Apr '15 2:36:54 PM Wyldchyld
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** And God help you if he actually writes an entire ''post'' in response to something a crank has said.
* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: Appropriately, [[http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/2006/01/when-eagles-go-bad.html the first ever Tet Zoo post]] covered recorded incidents of eagles killing large prey.

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** And God help you if he actually writes an entire ''post'' in response to something a crank has said. \n* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: Appropriately, [[http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/2006/01/when-eagles-go-bad.html the first ever Tet Zoo post]] covered recorded incidents of eagles killing large prey.


Added DiffLines:

* NobleBirdOfPrey: Appropriately, [[http://darrennaish.blogspot.com/2006/01/when-eagles-go-bad.html the first ever Tet Zoo post]] covered recorded incidents of eagles killing large prey.
17th Dec '14 6:35:46 AM albertonykus
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* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: There were [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/07/02/biggest-ever-fish-has-been-revised/ a]] [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/09/01/inside-natures-giants-ser-2-shark/ few]] [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/10/13/ing-giant-squid-special/ cases]] when Naish wrote posts about animals that aren't tetrapods.

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* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: There were [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/07/02/biggest-ever-fish-has-been-revised/ a]] [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/09/01/inside-natures-giants-ser-2-shark/ few]] [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/10/13/ing-giant-squid-special/ cases]] when Naish wrote posts about animals that aren't tetrapods. This was also the way he [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/2014/12/17/300-articles-at-tet-zoo-ver-3/ celebrated]] the 300th post at Tet Zoo V. 3.
14th Nov '14 8:44:27 PM albertonykus
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* FanNickname: "Tet Zoo", a term also used by Naish himself.



* MissingEpisode: The 13th podcast episode.



* ScheduleSlip: Used to happen quite frequently, and there are numerous post series started years ago that have yet to be finished. Fortunately, years of blogging have made Naish GenreSavvy by now, and these days he tends to finish series on his computer ''before'' he starts posting them, reducing the chances of this trope occurring.
* ScienceMarchesOn: Occasionally befalls the blog posts, though some of them have been reposted in later versions of the blog with updates.
** Sometimes brought up in the posts (or even as entire posts themselves) when discussing the history of study on particular animals.
24th Sep '14 7:50:40 AM Michal
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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: The April Fools' joke on [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/04/01/science-meets-mokele-mbembe/ the scientific discovery of the Mokele Mbembe]] mentions "coelacanths" multiple times while listing "living fossils".[[note]]This might double as a ContinuityNod, as in [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/04/17/esc-sea-monster-poster/ an earlier post]] Naish specifically addressed the claim that the existence of coelacanths proves that some extinct creatures such as plesiosaurs might actually survive to this day (it does not).[[/note]]

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* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: The April Fools' joke on [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/04/01/science-meets-mokele-mbembe/ the scientific discovery of the Mokele Mbembe]] mentions "coelacanths" multiple times while listing "living fossils".[[note]]This might double as a ContinuityNod, jab at proponents of the idea that some extinct animals such as plesiosaurs, pterosaurs or non-avian dinosaurs might actually survive to this day in remote corners of the world, as these people almost always cite specifically the existence of coelacanth as a fact showing that such survival is possible - a claim Naish addressed in [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/04/17/esc-sea-monster-poster/ an earlier post]] Naish specifically addressed the claim that the existence of coelacanths proves that some extinct creatures such as plesiosaurs might actually survive to this day (it does not).post]].[[/note]]



** [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/2014/05/24/ratite-evolution-part-ii/ The longest comment thread in the history of the blog]] made "Permian bears" a running gag for a while.[[note]]To elaborate, the discussion was in large part about different proposed explanations for geographic distribution of member of various groups of animals. The discussion was joined by two panbiogeographers, who argued that if members of particular group are present on more than one continent, then the group must have originated back then those continents were connected. This might be true in some cases, but they tended to reject possible alternatives, such as oversea dispersal, no matter how well supported by fossil record and other evidence. This led them to advocate things like [[http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2009.00411.x/abstract Jurassic origin for primates]] and, in the specific Tet Zoo comment thread, also Jurassic origin for ratites. One commenter then sarcastically suggested that, taking into account the geographic distribution of bears their Permian origin should be considered, and thus a RunningGag was born.[[/note]]

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** [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/2014/05/24/ratite-evolution-part-ii/ The longest comment thread in the history of the blog]] made "Permian bears" a running gag for a while.[[note]]To elaborate, the discussion was in large part about different proposed explanations for geographic distribution of member members of various groups of animals. The discussion was joined by two panbiogeographers, who argued that if members of particular group are present on more than one continent, then the group must have originated back then those continents were connected. This might be true in some cases, but they tended to reject possible alternatives, such as oversea dispersal, no matter how well supported by fossil record and other evidence. This led them to advocate things like [[http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2009.00411.x/abstract Jurassic origin for primates]] and, in the specific Tet Zoo comment thread, also Jurassic origin for ratites. One commenter then sarcastically suggested that, taking into account the geographic distribution of bears their Permian origin should be considered, and thus a RunningGag was born.[[/note]]
9th Aug '14 1:26:46 PM Michal
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Added DiffLines:

** [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/2014/05/24/ratite-evolution-part-ii/ The longest comment thread in the history of the blog]] made "Permian bears" a running gag for a while.[[note]]To elaborate, the discussion was in large part about different proposed explanations for geographic distribution of member of various groups of animals. The discussion was joined by two panbiogeographers, who argued that if members of particular group are present on more than one continent, then the group must have originated back then those continents were connected. This might be true in some cases, but they tended to reject possible alternatives, such as oversea dispersal, no matter how well supported by fossil record and other evidence. This led them to advocate things like [[http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2009.00411.x/abstract Jurassic origin for primates]] and, in the specific Tet Zoo comment thread, also Jurassic origin for ratites. One commenter then sarcastically suggested that, taking into account the geographic distribution of bears their Permian origin should be considered, and thus a RunningGag was born.[[/note]]
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