History BlindIdiotTranslation / Film

1st Dec '16 8:49:30 PM lucy24
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** Also, calling the Millenium Falcon for the Thousand Year Falcon, while not exactly wrong, certainly could have benefitted from a less direct translation.

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** Also, calling the Millenium Falcon for the Thousand Year Falcon, while not exactly wrong, certainly could have benefitted from a less direct translation.
23rd Nov '16 11:52:31 PM rjd1922
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--> ''"It's over Anakin! [[IHaveTheHighGround The geography I stands compares you superior!]]"''''

to:

--> ''"It's over Anakin! [[IHaveTheHighGround The geography that I stands compares you superior!]]"''''
20th Nov '16 5:58:46 PM Edgar81539
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* ''Film/Journey2TheMysteriousIsland'' was directly translated as Viaje 2: La Isla Misteriosa in the Latin American version, while still technically correct, it completely misses the Letters2Numbers factor, as the "two-to" homonym doesn't hold true in Spanish.
3rd Nov '16 3:28:12 AM sotnosen95
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* While ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' famously plays this trope for laughs in the opening credits, the 2001 DVD release contains an ''actual'' example with two scenes from a Japanese TV dub of the film. The French Taunter's dialogue is mostly translated correctly, though the translator clearly had difficulty with his insults, which are reduced to him calling King Arthur dumb and making YourMom jokes. However, the Knights Who Say Ni's dialogue is completely butchered; now the Knights are apparently all clones, and inhabit a forest filled with living (as in, mobile) trees, while King Arthur claims never to have heard of them before, yet is still somehow terrified by their reputation.

to:

* While ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' famously plays this trope for laughs in the opening credits, the 2001 DVD release contains an ''actual'' example with two scenes from a Japanese TV dub of the film. The French Taunter's dialogue is mostly translated correctly, though the translator clearly had difficulty with his insults, which are reduced to him calling King Arthur dumb and making YourMom jokes. However, the Knights Who Say Ni's dialogue is completely butchered; now the Knights are apparently all clones, and inhabit a forest filled with living (as in, mobile) trees, while King Arthur claims never to have heard of them before, yet is still somehow terrified by their reputation.reputation.
* The Swedish subtitles for ''Film/AChristmasCarol2009'' translates the "ghost" part of "Ghost of Christmas" as ''spöke''. ''Spöke'' does indeed mean "ghost"... except it does so in the sense of a person appearing after death. The proper word, not to mention the "official" translation for the "Ghosts of Christmas", is ''ande'', or "spirit".
20th Oct '16 12:44:50 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In ''Disney/BigHero6'', immediately after the first time Tadashi shows Baymax to Hiro, Tadashi asks Hiro what he thinks, to which Hiro replies that "That was sick!". The Hebrew dub translates the word "sick" into "חולני", which means "sickly", [[TheyJustDidntCare despite the obvious signs for this not being the correct definition]] - Hiro punches the air in excitement, and his intonation sounds enthusiastic. In fact, his intonation while saying this is enthusiastic ''even when saying the exact opposite in the dub''.

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* In ''Disney/BigHero6'', immediately after the first time Tadashi shows Baymax to Hiro, Tadashi asks Hiro what he thinks, to which Hiro replies that "That was sick!". The Hebrew dub translates the word "sick" into "חולני", which means "sickly", [[TheyJustDidntCare despite the obvious signs for this not being the correct definition]] definition - Hiro punches the air in excitement, and his intonation sounds enthusiastic. In fact, his intonation while saying this is enthusiastic ''even when saying the exact opposite in the dub''.
3rd Oct '16 6:14:22 AM OlfinBedwere
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* The Spaniard dub of ''ACryInTheDark'' translated "inquest" as ''encuesta'' ("poll"), rather than the correct ''investigación''.

to:

* The Spaniard dub of ''ACryInTheDark'' translated "inquest" as ''encuesta'' ("poll"), rather than the correct ''investigación''.''investigación''.
* In France, ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' had its title translated as ''Les Dents de la mer'' ("The Teeth of the Sea"), and ''Film/Jaws2'' was originally set to be released as "Les Dents de la mer 2." That changed when the film's French director, Jeannot Szwarc, pointed out that when said out loud it would sound almost exactly like "Les Dents de la merdes," or "The Teeth of the Shit." The title was therefore changed to "Les Dents de la mer, 2eme Partie," ("The Teeth of the Sea, Part 2") which is significantly less likely to sound rude.
* While ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' famously plays this trope for laughs in the opening credits, the 2001 DVD release contains an ''actual'' example with two scenes from a Japanese TV dub of the film. The French Taunter's dialogue is mostly translated correctly, though the translator clearly had difficulty with his insults, which are reduced to him calling King Arthur dumb and making YourMom jokes. However, the Knights Who Say Ni's dialogue is completely butchered; now the Knights are apparently all clones, and inhabit a forest filled with living (as in, mobile) trees, while King Arthur claims never to have heard of them before, yet is still somehow terrified by their reputation.
19th Sep '16 6:30:31 PM TropesForever
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* A bootleg copy of ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard''''. (from Indonesian dub) somehow managed to replace every third sentence with the words "Soyabean cake", which sounded ''ridiculous'' to many viewers reading the subtitles, eg:

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* A bootleg copy of ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard''''. ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard'' (from Indonesian dub) somehow managed to replace every third sentence with the words "Soyabean cake", which sounded ''ridiculous'' to many viewers reading the subtitles, eg:
18th Sep '16 3:54:11 AM Gess
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to:

* General
** I ''dare'' you to find a Hollywood movie, even a recent 6-figure budgeted blockbuster, where Russian labels, signs, announcements or any text at all will ''not'' be a bunch if incoherent gibberish.
5th Sep '16 10:07:13 AM erforce
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* Russian bootleg translation of ''Beowulf'' (1999) was titled "Biovolk", i.e., "Biological Wolf".
* Journey 2: The Mysterious Island was directly translated as Viaje 2: La Isla Misteriosa in the Latin American version, while still technically correct, it completely misses the [[Letters2Numbers Letters 2 Numbers]] factor, as the "two-to" homonym doesn't hold true in Spanish.
* A unusual example of a country completely butchering its own subtitles is RepoTheGeneticOpera, which came with some hilariously misquoted subtitles such as "I'll man his grave" instead of "on Marni's grave".

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* Russian bootleg translation of ''Beowulf'' (1999) ''Film/Beowulf1999'' was titled "Biovolk", i.e., "Biological Wolf".
* Journey 2: The Mysterious Island ''Film/Journey2TheMysteriousIsland'' was directly translated as Viaje 2: La Isla Misteriosa in the Latin American version, while still technically correct, it completely misses the [[Letters2Numbers Letters 2 Numbers]] Letters2Numbers factor, as the "two-to" homonym doesn't hold true in Spanish.
* A unusual example of a country completely butchering its own subtitles is RepoTheGeneticOpera, ''Film/RepoTheGeneticOpera'', which came with some hilariously misquoted subtitles such as "I'll man his grave" instead of "on Marni's grave".
30th Aug '16 1:26:22 PM Lancelot07
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* The Norwegian dub of ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' uses a really odd translation of the word "cook". While there is no good equivalent other than literally saying "to make food", the closest word might have been "kokke" (slang for making food), but the translators either didn't think of it or must have thought it didn't fit the lip sync, so they went for the word "koke"... which means "boil", so... "Anyone can ''boil"''.

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* The Norwegian dub of ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' uses used a really odd translation of the word "cook". While there is no good equivalent other than literally saying "to make food", the closest word might have been "kokke" (slang for making food), but the translators either didn't think of it or must have thought it didn't fit the lip sync, so they went for the word "koke"... which means "boil", so... "Anyone can ''boil"''.
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