History Bibliography / AgathaChristie

8th Dec '17 1:05:38 PM john_e
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** ''The Unbreakable Alibi''. First published in December, 1928. Parodies the "Joseph French" series by Freeman Wills Crofts.

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** ''The Unbreakable Alibi''. First published in December, 1928. Parodies the "Joseph French" series by Freeman Wills Crofts.Creator/FreemanWillsCrofts.
3rd Dec '17 3:39:31 PM NotThisThing
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* ''Literature/TheBodyInTheLibrary'' (1942). Second ''Literature/MissMarple'' novel. Also features Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife Dolly Bantry, Sir Henry Clithering, Colonel Melchett, and Detective Inspector Slack. Someone has murdered teenaged dancer Ruby Keene, and apparently dumped her body in the library room of Gossington hall, the Bantry family house. The villagers in St. Mary Mead start isolating Arthur, suspecting him of killing the girl. Jane Marple has [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. The case gets more complicated when it is discovered that Ruby is not the only teenaged girl missing. Pamela Reeves, a teenaged girl guide, is gone. She was a look-alike of Ruby.

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* ''Literature/TheBodyInTheLibrary'' (1942). Second ''Literature/MissMarple'' novel. Also features Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife Dolly Bantry, Sir Henry Clithering, Colonel Melchett, and Detective Inspector Slack. Someone has murdered teenaged dancer Ruby Keene, and apparently dumped her body in the library room of Gossington hall, Hall, the Bantry family house. The villagers in St. Mary Mead start isolating Arthur, suspecting him of killing the girl. Jane Marple has [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. The case gets more complicated when it is discovered that Ruby is not the only teenaged girl missing. Pamela Reeves, a teenaged girl guide, is gone. She was a look-alike of Ruby.



* ''Star Over Bethlehem and other stories'' (1965), title often shortened to ''Star Over Bethlehem''. A collection of works with a [[UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} Christian]] theme, including five poems and six stories. Only the title story had seen publication in magazine form, the rest were previously unpublished. While one of Christie's more obscure works, this collection was among her personal favorites and has its fans. The short stories were:

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* ''Star Over Bethlehem and other stories'' Other Stories'' (1965), title often shortened to ''Star Over Bethlehem''. A collection of works with a [[UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} Christian]] theme, including five poems and six stories. Only the title story had seen publication in magazine form, the rest were previously unpublished. While one of Christie's more obscure works, this collection was among her personal favorites and has its fans. The short stories were:



* ''At Bertram's Hotel'' (1965). Tenth Miss Marple novel. Also features Mr. Robinson of the Secret Service. Nostalgic for the days of her youth, Marple vacations at Bertram's Hotel, a location famous for maintaining the appearance and trappings of an [[TheEdwardianEra Edwardian Era]] establishment, well into the 1960s. It caters to those nostalgic for the past (old clergy, retired military and naval officers, elderly women), or those wishing to experience the luxuries of it. But Marple finds the place more reminiscent of a theatrical stage, more illusion than reality, with personnel acting as well-rehearsed actors. She recognizes among the guests famous adventurer Lady Bess Sedgwick and her estranged daughter Elvira Blake. Bess became famous decades before for her achievements as a pilot, race car driver, and member of the French Resistance. Marple finds the woman out of place in the seemingly quiet hotel. Soon a string of crimes connected to the hotel convinces Marple that there is a seedier side of this establishment and a darker side to several of its guests and staff. [[spoiler:The novel features a mother daughter threesome between Bess, Elvira, and Ladislaus Malinowski. Bess is established as the mastermind behind a criminal syndicate, addicted to taking risks, while Elvira turns out to be ruthless when it comes to claiming her inheritance. There are indeed several actors among the staff and the guests, playing major or minor roles in criminal plans.]] The novel is noted for its atmosphere, strong characterization for certain female characters, and sharp eye for social observation. But only a limited number of characters were actually fleshed out, making it less difficult to spot suspects.

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* ''At Bertram's Hotel'' (1965). Tenth Miss Marple novel. Also features Mr. Robinson of the Secret Service. Nostalgic for the days of her youth, Marple vacations at Bertram's Hotel, a location famous for maintaining the appearance and trappings of an [[TheEdwardianEra Edwardian Era]] establishment, well into the 1960s. It caters to those nostalgic for the past (old clergy, retired military and naval officers, elderly women), or those wishing to experience the luxuries of it. But Marple finds the place more reminiscent of a theatrical stage, more illusion than reality, with personnel acting as well-rehearsed actors. She recognizes among the guests famous adventurer Lady Bess Sedgwick and her estranged daughter Elvira Blake. Bess became famous decades before for her achievements as a pilot, race car driver, and member of the French Resistance. Marple finds the woman out of place in the seemingly quiet hotel. Soon a string of crimes connected to the hotel convinces Marple that there is a seedier side of this establishment and a darker side to several of its guests and staff. [[spoiler:The novel features a mother daughter threesome mother-daughter love triangle between Bess, Elvira, and Ladislaus Malinowski. Bess is established as the mastermind behind a criminal syndicate, addicted to taking risks, while Elvira turns out to be ruthless when it comes to claiming her inheritance. There are indeed several actors among the staff and the guests, playing major or minor roles in criminal plans.]] The novel is noted for its atmosphere, strong characterization for certain female characters, and sharp eye for social observation. But only a limited number of characters were actually fleshed out, making it less difficult to spot suspects.
3rd Dec '17 3:34:20 PM NotThisThing
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* ''The Pale Horse'' (1961). A mystery novel, featuring one-shot protagonists Mark Easterbrook and Catherine "Ginger" Corrigan. Ariadne Oliver plays a significant part. The novel also re-introduces a number of secondary characters from previous stories. Major Hugh Despard (previously called John Despard) and Rhoda Dawes from ''Cards on the Table'' (1936) are now a married couple with children of their own. Maud Dane Calthrop from ''The Moving Finger'' (1942) reprises her role of giving the religious perspective on events. There is also mention of an old lady in a mental hospital who repeats certain cryptic phrases. This serves as an EarlyBirdCameo of Mrs. Lancaster, a major character from ''By the Pricking of My Thumbs'' (1968). Mark Easterbrook, a professional historian, happens to witness a CatFight in a Chelsea coffee-bar. Thomasina Anne Tuckerton, {{Beatnik}} heiress to a large fortune, loses much of her hair in the fight, but claims to have felt no actual pain during the hair pulling. She dies shortly after, supposedly of natural causes. Mark soon learns of a long list of recent "natural" deaths who have had clear beneficiaries. Rumors have it that the inn "Pale Horse" serves as headquarters to a trio of witches able to kill persons from a distance and offering their MurderInc services to paying customers. The police don't take the story seriously, but Mark is intrigued enough to investigate, recruiting author Ariadne Oliver and painting restorer Ginger Corrigan to help him. The title is an allusion to the HorsemenOfTheApocalypse, though the characters initially fail to recognize its significance. The novel is famous for a detailed and accurate description of [[spoiler:thallium poisoning]]. It is credited with helping solve a number of real-life cases in the 1970s, since certain readers recognized the described symptoms in actual poisonings.

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* ''The Pale Horse'' (1961). A mystery novel, featuring one-shot protagonists Mark Easterbrook and Catherine Katherine "Ginger" Corrigan. Ariadne Oliver plays a significant part. The novel also re-introduces a number of secondary characters from previous stories. Major Hugh Despard (previously called John Despard) and Rhoda Dawes from ''Cards on the Table'' (1936) are now a married couple with children of their own. Maud Dane Calthrop from ''The Moving Finger'' (1942) reprises her role of giving the religious perspective on events. There is also mention of an old lady in a mental hospital who repeats certain cryptic phrases. This serves as an EarlyBirdCameo of Mrs. Lancaster, a major character from ''By the Pricking of My Thumbs'' (1968). Mark Easterbrook, a professional historian, happens to witness a CatFight in a Chelsea coffee-bar. Thomasina Anne Tuckerton, {{Beatnik}} heiress to a large fortune, loses much of her hair in the fight, but claims to have felt no actual pain during the hair pulling. She dies shortly after, supposedly of natural causes. Mark soon learns of a long list of recent "natural" deaths who have had clear beneficiaries. Rumors have it that the inn "Pale Horse" serves as headquarters to a trio of witches able to kill persons from a distance and offering their MurderInc services to paying customers. The police don't take the story seriously, but Mark is intrigued enough to investigate, recruiting author Ariadne Oliver and painting restorer Ginger Corrigan to help him. The title is an allusion to the HorsemenOfTheApocalypse, though the characters initially fail to recognize its significance. The novel is famous for a detailed and accurate description of [[spoiler:thallium poisoning]]. It is credited with helping solve a number of real-life cases in the 1970s, since certain readers recognized the described symptoms in actual poisonings.
3rd Dec '17 3:27:07 PM NotThisThing
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** ''In a Glass Darkly''. First published in July, 1934. Supernatural story, told from the perspective of an anonymous narrator. Shortly before UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the narrator has a strange vision in a mirror. He sees a beautiful woman strangulated by a man. He cannot see the face of the killer but does notice a distinctive scar. He then meets the woman of his vision: Sylvia Carslake, who is currently engaged to a man with a scar. He convinces her to call off the engagement. In the process the narrator falls in love with Sylvia. During World War One two things happen to the narrator: 1) he struggles with his unrequited feelings of love for Sylvia before managing to win her hand in marriage, and 2) he gets a distinctive scar of his own in the war. Following the War, the narrator is increasingly jealous of his beautiful wife and afraid she will betray him. He seems to be evolving to a CrazyJealousGuy. But is he changing to the Man in the Mirror?

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** ''In a Glass Darkly''. First published in July, 1934. Supernatural story, told from the perspective of an anonymous narrator. Shortly before UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the narrator has a strange vision in a mirror. He sees a beautiful woman strangulated strangled by a man. He cannot see the face of the killer but does notice a distinctive scar. He then meets the woman of his vision: Sylvia Carslake, who is currently engaged to a man with a scar. He convinces her to call off the engagement. In the process the narrator falls in love with Sylvia. During World War One two things happen to the narrator: 1) he struggles with his unrequited feelings of love for Sylvia before managing to win her hand in marriage, and 2) he gets a distinctive scar of his own in the war. Following the War, the narrator is increasingly jealous of his beautiful wife and afraid she will betray him. He seems to be evolving to a CrazyJealousGuy. But is he changing to the Man in the Mirror?



* ''Taken at the Flood'' (1948). Twenty-third Hercule Poirot novel. First appearance from Superintendent Spence. The novel is specifically set in post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Britain, and subplots cover the fates of veterans and other survivors. Lynn Marchmont has trouble adjusting to civilian life. She spent the War as a member of the Women's Royal Naval Service (WRNS, Wrens), serving in "Egypt, North Africa, ... Sicily. She had been under fire more than once." She got used to danger and excitement. Currently, Lynn has been discharged and is supposed to settle for a quiet life in the countryside with her dull farmer fiancé (and cousin) Rowley Cloade, who never even served in the War and had spent it at his farm. But when murders start occurring around and within the extended Cloade family, it seems likely that many of her dull family members have darker sides to their personalities. The difficult financial situation of the country following the prolonged War, has left many people struggling financially, and most of the Cloades are no exception. Everyone seeks to get his hands in the family fortune, currently owned by youthful widow Rosaleen Cloade. The novel notably uses the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope to a a greater extent than most works, [[spoiler:since Lynn gets turned on by the murderous impulses of Rowley, following his attempt to strangulate her, and decides to marry him after all. It is also to be noted that Poirot completely neglects Rowley's many crimes, which include manslaughter, attempting to frame someone else for said crime, and attempted murder.]]

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* ''Taken at the Flood'' (1948). Twenty-third Hercule Poirot novel. First appearance from Superintendent Spence. The novel is specifically set in post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Britain, and subplots cover the fates of veterans and other survivors. Lynn Marchmont has trouble adjusting to civilian life. She spent the War as a member of the Women's Royal Naval Service (WRNS, Wrens), serving in "Egypt, North Africa, ... Sicily. She had been under fire more than once." She got used to danger and excitement. Currently, Lynn has been discharged and is supposed to settle for a quiet life in the countryside with her dull farmer fiancé (and cousin) Rowley Cloade, who never even served in the War and had spent it at his farm. But when murders start occurring around and within the extended Cloade family, it seems likely that many of her dull family members have darker sides to their personalities. The difficult financial situation of the country following the prolonged War, has left many people struggling financially, and most of the Cloades are no exception. Everyone seeks to get his hands in the family fortune, currently owned by youthful widow Rosaleen Cloade. The novel notably uses the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope to a a greater extent than most works, [[spoiler:since Lynn gets turned on by the murderous impulses of Rowley, following his attempt to strangulate strangle her, and decides to marry him after all. It is also to be noted that Poirot completely neglects Rowley's many crimes, which include manslaughter, attempting to frame someone else for said crime, and attempted murder.]]



* ''4.50 from Paddington'' (1957), also known as ''What Mrs. [=McGillicuddy=] Saw!''. Seventh Miss Marple novel. The co-protagonist is Lucy Eyelesbarrow, a new character. Mrs. Elspeth [=McGillicuddy=], an elderly woman from Scotland, ends her stay in London after concluding her Christmas shopping. She next decides to visit her old friend Jane Marple and takes a train towards St. Mary Mead. She naps for part of her trip and wakes by the sound of another train, traveling parallel to her own. Through the windows of the trains, Elspeth witnesses a murder taking place aboard the second train, a man strangulating a woman. She later fails to convince the authorities about the reality of what she witnessed. They dismiss it as a nightmare or fantasy, but Miss Marple knowns that her friend has no imagination to speak of. Convinced that a crime did take place and that the corpse was thrown overboard, Marple estimates that the murder took place next to the grounds of Rutherford Hall. Too infirm to investigate the Hall by herself, Marple hires freelance housekeeper Lucy Eyelesbarrow to act as her proxy. The novel is noted for the strong characterization of the young co-protagonist and its memorable supporting cast, but it is considered a CluelessMystery with no way for the reader to determine how Marple reaches her solution.

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* ''4.50 from Paddington'' (1957), also known as ''What Mrs. [=McGillicuddy=] Saw!''. Seventh Miss Marple novel. The co-protagonist is Lucy Eyelesbarrow, a new character. Mrs. Elspeth [=McGillicuddy=], an elderly woman from Scotland, ends her stay in London after concluding her Christmas shopping. She next decides to visit her old friend Jane Marple and takes a train towards St. Mary Mead. She naps for part of her trip and wakes by the sound of another train, traveling parallel to her own. Through the windows of the trains, Elspeth witnesses a murder taking place aboard the second train, a man strangulating strangling a woman. She later fails to convince the authorities about the reality of what she witnessed. They dismiss it as a nightmare or fantasy, but Miss Marple knowns that her friend has no imagination to speak of. Convinced that a crime did take place and that the corpse was thrown overboard, Marple estimates that the murder took place next to the grounds of Rutherford Hall. Too infirm to investigate the Hall by herself, Marple hires freelance housekeeper Lucy Eyelesbarrow to act as her proxy. The novel is noted for the strong characterization of the young co-protagonist and its memorable supporting cast, but it is considered a CluelessMystery with no way for the reader to determine how Marple reaches her solution.
3rd Dec '17 3:06:21 PM NotThisThing
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* ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' (1939). First published as ''Ten Little Niggers'', then changed to ''Ten Little Indians'' before settling on the final title. A mystery novel. Ten people with seemingly nothing in common among them gather at Nigger Island (referred to as Soldier Island in newer reprints) off the coast of Devon. Someone lured them there, citing different causes for the gathering to each person. They then start dying one by one, in ways reminiscent of the nursery rhyme of the original title. Christie often used an IronicNurseryTune to provide titles or plot points for her stories, but this is by far her most successful use of the trope. Due to claims of racist implications in the original version, the novel has been revised in later editions, replacing all references to niggers with more AcceptableTargets.

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* ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' (1939). First published as ''Ten Little Niggers'', then changed to ''Ten Little Indians'' before settling on the final title. A mystery novel. Ten people with seemingly nothing in common among them gather at Nigger Island (referred to as Indian Island, then Soldier Island Island, in newer reprints) off the coast of Devon. Someone lured them there, citing different causes for the gathering to each person. They then start dying one by one, in ways reminiscent of the nursery rhyme of the original title. Christie often used an IronicNurseryTune to provide titles or plot points for her stories, but this is by far her most successful use of the trope. Due to claims of racist implications in the original version, the novel has been revised in later editions, replacing all references to niggers with more AcceptableTargets."niggers."
3rd Dec '17 3:02:28 PM NotThisThing
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* ''The Floating Admiral'' (1931). A collaborative novel written by 14 members of the Detection Club, Christie included. The initial setting has Admiral Penistone discovered floating down the river on a small bot, stabbed to death. Inspector Rudge investigates the murder, but soon notices that several persons involved in the case act in particularly suspicious ways. Each author agreed to contribute a new chapter, with new clues and a new direction to the story, while building on the clues of the others. Each had their own solution, though only one became "official" at the finale. In order of writing the authors were: 1) Creator/GKChesterton, 2) Victor Whitechurch, 3) George Douglas Howard Cole, 4) Margaret Cole, 5) Henry Wade, 6) Agatha Christie, 7) "John Rode", actually an alias for Major Cecil John Charles Street, 8) Milward Kennedy, 9) Creator/DorothyLSayers, 10) Ronald Knox, 11) Freeman Wills Crofts, 12) Edgar Jepson, 13) "Clemence Dane", actually an alias for Winifred Ashton, and 14) Anthony Berkeley Cox.

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* ''The Floating Admiral'' (1931). A collaborative novel written by 14 members of the Detection Club, Christie included. The initial setting has Admiral Penistone discovered floating down the river on a small bot, boat, stabbed to death. Inspector Rudge investigates the murder, but soon notices that several persons involved in the case act in particularly suspicious ways. Each author agreed to contribute a new chapter, with new clues and a new direction to the story, while building on the clues of the others. Each had their own solution, though only one became "official" at the finale. In order of writing the authors were: 1) Creator/GKChesterton, 2) Victor Whitechurch, 3) George Douglas Howard Cole, 4) Margaret Cole, 5) Henry Wade, 6) Agatha Christie, 7) "John Rode", actually an alias for Major Cecil John Charles Street, 8) Milward Kennedy, 9) Creator/DorothyLSayers, 10) Ronald Knox, 11) Freeman Wills Crofts, 12) Edgar Jepson, 13) "Clemence Dane", actually an alias for Winifred Ashton, and 14) Anthony Berkeley Cox.



* ''Death in the Clouds'' (1935). Tenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp. The novel contains an early use of the DeathInTheClouds plot, murder aboard a passenger flight. Notable for being one of the few (if not the only) Christie works to give a specific year as its setting (1934).

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* ''Death in the Clouds'' (1935). Tenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp. The novel contains an early use of the DeathInTheClouds plot, murder aboard a passenger flight. Notable for being one of the few (if not the only) Christie works to give a specific year as its setting (1934).



** ''The Incredible Theft''. A reworking of 'The Submarine Plans''. The novella was first published, in 6 parts, during April, 1937. The plans of a new bomber plane are stolen from the house of the engineer who was safekeeping them. The theft probably took place during a house party. The suspects include the family members of the engineer, his secretary, an active Air Marshall of the Royal Air Force, a Member of Parliament, and an American socialite with the reputation of having a career in espionage. Poirot briefly consults Mr. Satterthwaite on the backgrounds of the suspects.
** ''Dead Man's Mirror''. A reworking of ''The Second Gong''. The earlier version had been published in July, 1932. Sir Gervase Chevenix-Gor, an aging aristocrat, summons Poirot to help him with a problem concerning those closest to him, his family members and his trusted employees. By the time Poirot arrives, Chevenix-Gor is already dead. Killed with a bullet to the head. Poirot has to determine first whether it was suicide or murder. Then determine which of the suspects had the motives or opportunity for murder. While still not knowing why Chevenix-Gor had summoned him in the first place.

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** ''The Incredible Theft''. A reworking of 'The Submarine Plans''. The novella was first published, in 6 parts, during April, 1937. The plans of a new bomber plane are stolen from the house of the engineer who was safekeeping them. The theft probably took place during a house party. The suspects include the family members of the engineer, his secretary, an active Air Marshall of the Royal Air Force, a Member of Parliament, and an American socialite with the reputation of having a career in espionage. Poirot briefly consults Mr. Satterthwaite on the backgrounds of the suspects.
espionage.
** ''Dead Man's Mirror''. A reworking of ''The Second Gong''. The earlier version had been published in July, 1932. Sir Gervase Chevenix-Gor, Chevenix-Gore, an aging aristocrat, summons Poirot to help him with a problem concerning those closest to him, his family members and his trusted employees. By the time Poirot arrives, Chevenix-Gor Chevenix-Gore is already dead. Killed with a bullet to the head. Poirot has to determine first whether it was suicide or murder. Then determine which of the suspects had the motives or opportunity for murder. While still not knowing why Chevenix-Gor Chevenix-Gore had summoned him in the first place.place. The story features a cameo from Mr. Satterthwaite, whom Poirot briefly consults on the backgrounds of the suspects.
3rd Dec '17 2:42:21 PM NotThisThing
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* ''Literature/TheSittafordMystery'' (1931). A mystery novel. with new protagonists Emily Trefusis and Charles Enderby. Trefusis is a young model whose fiancée has been framed for a murder and she intends to [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. Enderby is a professional journalist who acts as her partner, partly to get a scoop, partly because is in love with her. The Dartmoor, Devon setting and some story elements have the story frequently compared to ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' (1902), a Literature/SherlockHolmes novel, though it should be noted that Devon is the setting for several Christie stories, most notably ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''.

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* ''Literature/TheSittafordMystery'' (1931). A mystery novel. novel, with new protagonists Emily Trefusis and Charles Enderby. Trefusis is a young model whose fiancée has been framed for a murder and she intends to [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. Enderby is a professional journalist who acts as her partner, partly to get a scoop, partly because is in love with her. The Dartmoor, Devon setting and some story elements have the story frequently compared to ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' (1902), a Literature/SherlockHolmes novel, though it should be noted that Devon is the setting for several Christie stories, most notably ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''.
3rd Dec '17 2:41:57 PM NotThisThing
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* ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'' (1920). First novel by Christie. First appearances for Literature/HerculePoirot, Arthur Hastings, and Inspector Japp.

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* ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'' (1920). First novel by Christie. First appearances for Literature/HerculePoirot, Arthur Hastings, and Inspector James Japp.



* ''Literature/TheSittafordMystery'' (1931). A mystery novel. The main characters are Emily Trefusis, and Charles Enderby. Trefusis is a young model whose fiancée has been framed for a murder and she intends to [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. Enderby is a professional journalist who acts as her partner, partly to get a scoop, partly because he has the hots for her. The Dartmoor, Devon setting and some story elements have the story frequently compared to ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' (1902), a Literature/SherlockHolmes novel, though it should be noted that Devon is the setting for several Christie stories, most notably ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''.
* ''The Floating Admiral'' (1931). A collaborative novel written by 14 members of the Detection Club, Christie included. The initial setting has Admiral Penistone discovered floating down the river on a small bot, stabbed to death. Inspector Rudger investigates the murder, but soon notices that several persons involved in the case act in particularly suspicious ways. Each author agreed to contribute a new chapter, with new clues and a new direction to the story, while building on the clues of the others. Each had their own solution, though only one became "official" at the finale. In order of writing the authors were: 1) Creator/GKChesterton, 2) Victor Whitechurch, 3) George Douglas Howard Cole, 4) Margaret Cole, 5) Henry Wade, 6) Agatha Christie, 7) "John Rode", actually an alias for Major Cecil John Charles Street, 8) Milward Kennedy, 9) Creator/DorothyLSayers, 10) Ronald Knox, 11) Freeman Wills Crofts, 12) Edgar Jepson, 13) "Clemence Dane", actually an alias for Winifred Ashton, and 14) Anthony Berkeley Cox.

to:

* ''Literature/TheSittafordMystery'' (1931). A mystery novel. The main characters are with new protagonists Emily Trefusis, Trefusis and Charles Enderby. Trefusis is a young model whose fiancée has been framed for a murder and she intends to [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. Enderby is a professional journalist who acts as her partner, partly to get a scoop, partly because he has the hots for is in love with her. The Dartmoor, Devon setting and some story elements have the story frequently compared to ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' (1902), a Literature/SherlockHolmes novel, though it should be noted that Devon is the setting for several Christie stories, most notably ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''.
* ''The Floating Admiral'' (1931). A collaborative novel written by 14 members of the Detection Club, Christie included. The initial setting has Admiral Penistone discovered floating down the river on a small bot, stabbed to death. Inspector Rudger Rudge investigates the murder, but soon notices that several persons involved in the case act in particularly suspicious ways. Each author agreed to contribute a new chapter, with new clues and a new direction to the story, while building on the clues of the others. Each had their own solution, though only one became "official" at the finale. In order of writing the authors were: 1) Creator/GKChesterton, 2) Victor Whitechurch, 3) George Douglas Howard Cole, 4) Margaret Cole, 5) Henry Wade, 6) Agatha Christie, 7) "John Rode", actually an alias for Major Cecil John Charles Street, 8) Milward Kennedy, 9) Creator/DorothyLSayers, 10) Ronald Knox, 11) Freeman Wills Crofts, 12) Edgar Jepson, 13) "Clemence Dane", actually an alias for Winifred Ashton, and 14) Anthony Berkeley Cox.
3rd Dec '17 2:38:48 PM NotThisThing
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* ''The Seven Dials Mystery'' (1929). A sequel to ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Lady Eileen "Bundle" Brent investigates a series of murders. Superintendent Battle, and Bill Eversleigh also return. Two new amateur detectives, Jimmy Thesiger and Lorraine Wade, assist Bundle. ''([[spoiler:They are actually the two murderers, trying to cover their tracks.]])'' The story contains an early use of the DetectiveMole plot.

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* ''The Seven Dials Mystery'' (1929). A sequel to ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Lady Eileen "Bundle" Brent investigates a series of murders. Superintendent Battle, Battle and Bill Eversleigh also return. Two return from ''Chimneys'', while two new amateur detectives, characters, Jimmy Thesiger and Lorraine Wade, assist Bundle. ''([[spoiler:They are actually the two murderers, trying to cover their tracks.]])'' The story contains an early use of the DetectiveMole plot.
3rd Dec '17 2:36:59 PM NotThisThing
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* ''The Seven Dials Mystery'' (1929). A sequel to ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Lady Eileen "Bundle" Brent investigates a series of murders. Superintendent Battle, and Bill Eversleigh also return. Two new AmateurDetectives are added to the cast: Jimmy Thesiger and Elaine Wade. (''[[spoiler:They are actually the two murderers, trying to cover their tracks]]''). The story contains an early use of the DetectiveMole plot.

to:

* ''The Seven Dials Mystery'' (1929). A sequel to ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Lady Eileen "Bundle" Brent investigates a series of murders. Superintendent Battle, and Bill Eversleigh also return. Two new AmateurDetectives are added to the cast: amateur detectives, Jimmy Thesiger and Elaine Wade. (''[[spoiler:They Lorraine Wade, assist Bundle. ''([[spoiler:They are actually the two murderers, trying to cover their tracks]]''). tracks.]])'' The story contains an early use of the DetectiveMole plot.
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