History Bibliography / AgathaChristie

25th Aug '16 10:00:34 AM Doug86
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* ''The Labours of Hercules'' (1947). Short story collection, featuring 12 Hercule Poirot stories. In the frame story Poirot has a conversation with his friend, Dr. Burton. Burton points out that Poirot is named after a major figure from Myth/ClassicalMythology, but doesn't resemble his namesake in the slightest. Also pointing out that Poirot is seriously lacking in literary education, having never bothered to read ClassicLiterature. Finally, Burton pokes fun at Poirot's constant efforts at retirement. Pointing out that Poirot is always tempted to take OneLastJob, and then ""That’s the way of it. Just a case or two, just one case more – the Prima Donna’s farewell performance won’t be in it with yours, Poirot." In response Poirot decides to take just 12 more cases before retirement, each an allusion to the labours of his namesake. The stories were originally published in magazines between 1939 and 1947. This is often considered among the strongest of the Christie short story collections, largely due to the unifying theme and inspiration from legendary material. On the other hand, the uneven quality of the stories has been pointed out.

to:

* ''The Labours of Hercules'' (1947). Short story collection, featuring 12 Hercule Poirot stories. In the frame story Poirot has a conversation with his friend, Dr. Burton. Burton points out that Poirot is named after a major figure from Myth/ClassicalMythology, but doesn't resemble his namesake in the slightest. Also pointing out that Poirot is seriously lacking in literary education, having never bothered to read ClassicLiterature. Finally, Burton pokes fun at Poirot's constant efforts at retirement. Pointing out that Poirot is always tempted to take OneLastJob, and then ""That’s "That's the way of it. Just a case or two, just one case more – the Prima Donna’s Donna's farewell performance won’t won't be in it with yours, Poirot." In response Poirot decides to take just 12 more cases before retirement, each an allusion to the labours of his namesake. The stories were originally published in magazines between 1939 and 1947. This is often considered among the strongest of the Christie short story collections, largely due to the unifying theme and inspiration from legendary material. On the other hand, the uneven quality of the stories has been pointed out.
12th Aug '16 9:29:09 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* ''Three Blind Mice'' (1947). A single-episode RadioDrama, broadcast in May, 1947. Christie later adapted the tale into both the short story 'Three Blind Mice'' and the theatrical play ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'' (1952). While the texts of both later versions are commercially available, the script of the radio play has never been published. There are also no known recordings of the broadcast.

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* ''Three Blind Mice'' (1947). A single-episode RadioDrama, broadcast in May, 1947. Christie later adapted the tale into both the short story 'Three ''Three Blind Mice'' and the theatrical play ''Theatre/TheMousetrap'' (1952). While the texts of both later versions are commercially available, the script of the radio play has never been published. There are also no known recordings of the broadcast.
29th Jul '16 2:55:14 AM Adept
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* ''The Clocks'' (1963). Twenty-ninth Hercule Poirot novel, has spy fiction elements. Also features secret agent Colin Lamb, whose name was an alias. He is hinted to be a son to the retired Superintendent Battle. Sheila Webb, a typist-for-hire, is sent by her agency to the residence of a new client. She enters through the unlocked front door and finds only a corpse waiting for her. That of a well-dressed man surrounded by clocks set at a specific hour. Curiously, the man did not live in this house and his business cards used a false name. The secret service takes an interest in the case and Poirot is asked to help. In this case, Poirot serves more as an EccentricMentor to Colin than a detective. He rarely leaves his apartment. Waiting for his "student" to investigate the crime scene, locate witnesses, and interrogate suspects. While Poirot contemplates the significance of each new clue. One of the complications of this case was that the neighborhood of the murder was virtually vacant at the time of the murder. Most people off to school and work, and no nosy neighbors left. Poirot complaining that all the old ladies have ended up in nursing homes, leaving him unable to gain info through gossip. Later, a significant witness is found through a situation based on the film ''Film/RearWindow'' (1954). During the story, Poirot is supposedly preparing his own book on literary mysteries. Which leads to a {{Metafiction}}-style critique of many writers and their literary tropes. The novel is considered well-narrated, and highly entertaining. But rather disappointing in its handling of clues. [[spoiler:A number of the most puzzling clues turn out to be meaningless. The killer attempting to confuse the investigators by planting said clues and having the investigatoes waist time on analyzing them.]]

to:

* ''The Clocks'' ''Literature/TheClocks'' (1963). Twenty-ninth Hercule Poirot novel, has spy fiction elements. Also features secret agent Colin Lamb, whose name was an alias. He is hinted to be a son to the retired Superintendent Battle. Sheila Webb, a typist-for-hire, is sent by her agency to the residence of a new client. She enters through the unlocked front door and finds only a corpse waiting for her. That of a well-dressed man surrounded by clocks set at a specific hour. Curiously, the man did not live in this house and his business cards used a false name. The secret service takes an interest in the case and Poirot is asked to help. In this case, Poirot serves more as an EccentricMentor to Colin than a detective. He rarely leaves his apartment. Waiting for his "student" to investigate the crime scene, locate witnesses, and interrogate suspects. While Poirot contemplates the significance of each new clue. One of the complications of this case was that the neighborhood of the murder was virtually vacant at the time of the murder. Most people off to school and work, and no nosy neighbors left. Poirot complaining that all the old ladies have ended up in nursing homes, leaving him unable to gain info through gossip. Later, a significant witness is found through a situation based on the film ''Film/RearWindow'' (1954). During the story, Poirot is supposedly preparing his own book on literary mysteries. Which leads to a {{Metafiction}}-style critique of many writers and their literary tropes. The novel is considered well-narrated, and highly entertaining. But rather disappointing in its handling of clues. [[spoiler:A number of the most puzzling clues turn out to be meaningless. The killer attempting to confuse the investigators by planting said clues and having the investigatoes waist time on analyzing them.]]
25th Jul '16 6:16:38 AM Adept
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* ''Literature/OneTwoBuckleMyShoe' (1940). Nineteenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp, making his last appearance in a novel. Henry Morley, Poirot's dentist, has been murdered, having been shot to death within his own office. Fellow customer Amberiotis, a Greek blackmailer, is also dead, killed by an overdose of anesthetic. Another client, Mabelle Sainsbury Seale, vanishes, but the body of a woman matching her age soon turns up, with the face disfigured beyond recognition. The life of a fourth customer, politically-influential banker Alistair Blunt, might be in danger. Poirot has to discover what connects the murders to each other. The novel is set in the political climate of the late 1930s, with subplots covering the British Union of Fascists gaining a following among the new generation, communism also spreading out, and political tensions increasing. Blunt himself is a conservative figure, and the main figure maintaining the stability of the current British political system. The murders have an ideological motivation and the killer firmly believes that the ends justify the means. Poirot has to make his own decision on the matter, struggling with a MoralDilemma by the finale. The novel is considered particularly gloomy and humorless, arguably reflecting its setting in time.

to:

* ''Literature/OneTwoBuckleMyShoe' ''Literature/OneTwoBuckleMyShoe'' (1940). Nineteenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp, making his last appearance in a novel. Henry Morley, Poirot's dentist, has been murdered, having been shot to death within his own office. Fellow customer Amberiotis, a Greek blackmailer, is also dead, killed by an overdose of anesthetic. Another client, Mabelle Sainsbury Seale, vanishes, but the body of a woman matching her age soon turns up, with the face disfigured beyond recognition. The life of a fourth customer, politically-influential banker Alistair Blunt, might be in danger. Poirot has to discover what connects the murders to each other. The novel is set in the political climate of the late 1930s, with subplots covering the British Union of Fascists gaining a following among the new generation, communism also spreading out, and political tensions increasing. Blunt himself is a conservative figure, and the main figure maintaining the stability of the current British political system. The murders have an ideological motivation and the killer firmly believes that the ends justify the means. Poirot has to make his own decision on the matter, struggling with a MoralDilemma by the finale. The novel is considered particularly gloomy and humorless, arguably reflecting its setting in time.
22nd Jul '16 9:46:54 AM Adept
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* ''Literature/TowardsZero'' (1944). Fifth and last novel featuring Superintendent Battle, but the only one where he is clearly the protagonist. The story introduces his wife Mary and teenaged daughter Sylvia. And mentions he has at least four other children. Battle's And nephew and partner for the case, Inspector James Leach, is also introduced.The novel explores the premise of "the murder is the end" of the story, and that "the story begins long before that -years before, sometimes with all the causes and events that bring certain people to a certain place at a certain time on a certain day. All converging towards a given spot... And then, the time comes... Zero hour." So the murder happens relatively late in the novel. Readers instead get to see events in the lives of the victim, the suspects , the investigator, and other characters entangled in the case. Leading up to the murder of Lady Camilla Tressilian. At the heard of the mystery is a somewhat unusual LoveTriangle. Nevile Strange, the main heir to the victim, and his two wives: Audrey Strange and Kay Strange. Somehow all three are vacationing together and their emotions on the subject are explored in depth.

to:

* ''Literature/TowardsZero'' (1944). Fifth and last novel featuring Superintendent Battle, but the only one where he is clearly the protagonist. The story introduces his wife Mary and teenaged daughter Sylvia. And mentions he has at least four other children. Battle's And nephew and partner for the case, Inspector James Leach, is also introduced.The novel explores the premise of "the murder is the end" of the story, and that "the story begins long before that -years before, sometimes with all the causes and events that bring certain people to a certain place at a certain time on a certain day. All converging towards a given spot... And then, the time comes... Zero hour." So the murder happens relatively late in the novel. Readers instead get to see events in the lives of the victim, the suspects , the investigator, and other characters entangled in the case. Leading up to the murder of Lady Camilla Tressilian. At the heard of the mystery is a somewhat unusual LoveTriangle. Nevile Strange, the main heir to the victim, and his two wives: Audrey Strange and Kay Strange. Somehow all three are vacationing together and their emotions on the subject are explored in depth.
19th Jul '16 9:38:33 PM Adept
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* ''The Secret Adversary'' (1922). The first of Christie's spy thriller novels. First appearances for Thomas "Literature/{{Tommy|AndTuppence}}" Beresford, Prudence "Literature/{{T|ommyAndTuppence}}uppence" Cowley, and their sidekick Albert Batt. There is a crossover of sorts with the Hercule Poirot series, as the calling card of Inspector Japp appears in a brief scene.

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* ''The Secret Adversary'' (1922). The first of Christie's spy thriller novels. First appearances for [[Literature/TommyAndTuppence Thomas "Literature/{{Tommy|AndTuppence}}" "Tommy" Beresford, Prudence "Literature/{{T|ommyAndTuppence}}uppence" Cowley, "Tuppence" Cowley]], and their sidekick Albert Batt. There is a crossover of sorts with the Hercule Poirot series, as the calling card of Inspector Japp appears in a brief scene.



* ''Three Act Tragedy'' (1935). Ninth Hercule Poirot novel. Poirot has a team up with Mr. Satterthwaite. Other important characters include two amateur sleuths working with the two veterans: retired actor Sir Charles Cartwright and his teenaged love interest Hermione "Egg" Lytton Gore. In this novel Poirot acts mostly as an [[PhoneInDetective Armchair Detective]]. The other three sleuths gather clues, examine crime scenes and interview the usual suspects. They then report their findings to Poirot for analysis. The story contains famous examples of SerialKillingsSpecificTarget and DetectiveMole.

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* ''Three Act Tragedy'' ''Literature/ThreeActTragedy'' (1935). Ninth Hercule Poirot novel. Poirot has a team up with Mr. Satterthwaite. Other important characters include two amateur sleuths working with the two veterans: retired actor Sir Charles Cartwright and his teenaged much younger love interest Hermione "Egg" Lytton Gore. In this novel Poirot acts mostly as an [[PhoneInDetective Armchair Detective]]. The other three sleuths gather clues, examine crime scenes and interview the usual suspects. They then report their findings to Poirot for analysis. The story contains famous examples of SerialKillingsSpecificTarget and DetectiveMole.
13th Jul '16 10:25:56 PM Adept
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* ''The Big Four'' (1927). Fourth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, Inspector Japp, and Countess Vera Rossakoff . Unusually for this series, the novel is a spy thriller. It is also an episodic novel. Several different cases, connected by the broad theme of Poirot facing the Big Four, an alliance of villains. Several chapters are actually revised versions of 12 different short stories, published in magazines during 1924. First appearances for The titular Four. Their ranks include are: 1) Li Chang Yen, a Chinese criminal mastermind. Lives as a recluse in Pekin, but organizes plans with worldwide scope and effects. A YellowPeril, often considered an {{Expy}} of Franchise/FuManchu. 2) Abe Ryland. An American businessman, supposedly "the richest man in the world". A CorruptCorporateExecutive-type. 3) Madame Olivier. A famous French scientist, with shady activities on the side. Permanently disfigured with a scar on her cheek. Serves as both a FemmeFatale and a [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Villainous Scientist]]. 4) Claude Darrell. A MasterOfDisguise, and [[ProfessionalKiller Assassin]]. The name is an alias and his true features are always hidden.

to:

* ''The Big Four'' ''Literature/TheBigFour'' (1927). Fourth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, Inspector Japp, and Countess Vera Rossakoff . Unusually for this series, the novel is a spy thriller. It is also an episodic novel. Several different cases, connected by the broad theme of Poirot facing the Big Four, an alliance of villains. Several chapters are actually revised versions of 12 different short stories, published in magazines during 1924. First appearances for The titular Four. Their ranks include are: 1) Li Chang Yen, a Chinese criminal mastermind. Lives as a recluse in Pekin, but organizes plans with worldwide scope and effects. A YellowPeril, often considered an {{Expy}} of Franchise/FuManchu. 2) Abe Ryland. An American businessman, supposedly "the richest man in the world". A CorruptCorporateExecutive-type. 3) Madame Olivier. A famous French scientist, with shady activities on the side. Permanently disfigured with a scar on her cheek. Serves as both a FemmeFatale and a [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Villainous Scientist]]. 4) Claude Darrell. A MasterOfDisguise, and [[ProfessionalKiller Assassin]]. The name is an alias and his true features are always hidden.
12th Jul '16 12:51:35 AM Adept
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* ''One, Two, Buckle My Shoe'' (1940). Nineteenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp, making his last appearance in a novel. Henry Morley, Poirot's dentist, has been murdered, having been shot to death within his own office. Fellow customer Amberiotis, a Greek blackmailer, is also dead, killed by an overdose of anesthetic. Another client, Mabelle Sainsbury Seale, vanishes, but the body of a woman matching her age soon turns up, with the face disfigured beyond recognition. The life of a fourth customer, politically-influential banker Alistair Blunt, might be in danger. Poirot has to discover what connects the murders to each other. The novel is set in the political climate of the late 1930s, with subplots covering the British Union of Fascists gaining a following among the new generation, communism also spreading out, and political tensions increasing. Blunt himself is a conservative figure, and the main figure maintaining the stability of the current British political system. The murders have an ideological motivation and the killer firmly believes that the ends justify the means. Poirot has to make his own decision on the matter, struggling with a MoralDilemma by the finale. The novel is considered particularly gloomy and humorless, arguably reflecting its setting in time.

to:

* ''One, Two, Buckle My Shoe'' ''Literature/OneTwoBuckleMyShoe' (1940). Nineteenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp, making his last appearance in a novel. Henry Morley, Poirot's dentist, has been murdered, having been shot to death within his own office. Fellow customer Amberiotis, a Greek blackmailer, is also dead, killed by an overdose of anesthetic. Another client, Mabelle Sainsbury Seale, vanishes, but the body of a woman matching her age soon turns up, with the face disfigured beyond recognition. The life of a fourth customer, politically-influential banker Alistair Blunt, might be in danger. Poirot has to discover what connects the murders to each other. The novel is set in the political climate of the late 1930s, with subplots covering the British Union of Fascists gaining a following among the new generation, communism also spreading out, and political tensions increasing. Blunt himself is a conservative figure, and the main figure maintaining the stability of the current British political system. The murders have an ideological motivation and the killer firmly believes that the ends justify the means. Poirot has to make his own decision on the matter, struggling with a MoralDilemma by the finale. The novel is considered particularly gloomy and humorless, arguably reflecting its setting in time.
8th Jul '16 5:25:32 AM Adept
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* ''AndThenThereWereNone'' (1943). First published as ''Ten Little Niggers''. Second theatrical play by Christie, an adaptation of the 1939 novel. First produced in 1943, published in book form during 1944. Christie introduced some key differences in characterization and a RevisedEnding. In simple terms, the novel had a famous DownerEnding, the play had a HappyEnding.
* ''Towards Zero'' (1944). Fifth and last novel featuring Superintendent Battle, but the only one where he is clearly the protagonist. The story introduces his wife Mary and teenaged daughter Sylvia. And mentions he has at least four other children. Battle's And nephew and partner for the case, Inspector James Leach, is also introduced.The novel explores the premise of "the murder is the end" of the story, and that "the story begins long before that -years before, sometimes with all the causes and events that bring certain people to a certain place at a certain time on a certain day. All converging towards a given spot... And then, the time comes... Zero hour." So the murder happens relatively late in the novel. Readers instead get to see events in the lives of the victim, the suspects , the investigator, and other characters entangled in the case. Leading up to the murder of Lady Camilla Tressilian. At the heard of the mystery is a somewhat unusual LoveTriangle. Nevile Strange, the main heir to the victim, and his two wives: Audrey Strange and Kay Strange. Somehow all three are vacationing together and their emotions on the subject are explored in depth.

to:

* ''AndThenThereWereNone'' ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' (1943). First published as ''Ten Little Niggers''. Second theatrical play by Christie, an adaptation of the 1939 novel. First produced in 1943, published in book form during 1944. Christie introduced some key differences in characterization and a RevisedEnding. In simple terms, the novel had a famous DownerEnding, the play had a HappyEnding.
* ''Towards Zero'' ''Literature/TowardsZero'' (1944). Fifth and last novel featuring Superintendent Battle, but the only one where he is clearly the protagonist. The story introduces his wife Mary and teenaged daughter Sylvia. And mentions he has at least four other children. Battle's And nephew and partner for the case, Inspector James Leach, is also introduced.The novel explores the premise of "the murder is the end" of the story, and that "the story begins long before that -years before, sometimes with all the causes and events that bring certain people to a certain place at a certain time on a certain day. All converging towards a given spot... And then, the time comes... Zero hour." So the murder happens relatively late in the novel. Readers instead get to see events in the lives of the victim, the suspects , the investigator, and other characters entangled in the case. Leading up to the murder of Lady Camilla Tressilian. At the heard of the mystery is a somewhat unusual LoveTriangle. Nevile Strange, the main heir to the victim, and his two wives: Audrey Strange and Kay Strange. Somehow all three are vacationing together and their emotions on the subject are explored in depth.
1st Jul '16 2:24:23 PM Doug86
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* ''The Big Four'' (1927). Fourth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, Inspector Japp, and Countess Vera Rossakoff . Unusually for this series, the novel is a spy thriller. It is also an episodic novel. Several different cases, connected by the broad theme of Poirot facing the Big Four, an alliance of villains. Several chapters are actually revised versions of 12 different short stories, published in magazines during 1924. First appearances for The titular Four. Their ranks include are: 1) Li Chang Yen, a Chinese criminal mastermind. Lives as a recluse in Pekin, but organizes plans with worldwide scope and effects. A YellowPeril, often considered an {{Expy}} of FuManchu. 2) Abe Ryland. An American businessman, supposedly "the richest man in the world". A CorruptCorporateExecutive-type. 3) Madame Olivier. A famous French scientist, with shady activities on the side. Permanently disfigured with a scar on her cheek. Serves as both a FemmeFatale and a [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Villainous Scientist]]. 4) Claude Darrell. A MasterOfDisguise, and [[ProfessionalKiller Assassin]]. The name is an alias and his true features are always hidden.

to:

* ''The Big Four'' (1927). Fourth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, Inspector Japp, and Countess Vera Rossakoff . Unusually for this series, the novel is a spy thriller. It is also an episodic novel. Several different cases, connected by the broad theme of Poirot facing the Big Four, an alliance of villains. Several chapters are actually revised versions of 12 different short stories, published in magazines during 1924. First appearances for The titular Four. Their ranks include are: 1) Li Chang Yen, a Chinese criminal mastermind. Lives as a recluse in Pekin, but organizes plans with worldwide scope and effects. A YellowPeril, often considered an {{Expy}} of FuManchu.Franchise/FuManchu. 2) Abe Ryland. An American businessman, supposedly "the richest man in the world". A CorruptCorporateExecutive-type. 3) Madame Olivier. A famous French scientist, with shady activities on the side. Permanently disfigured with a scar on her cheek. Serves as both a FemmeFatale and a [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Villainous Scientist]]. 4) Claude Darrell. A MasterOfDisguise, and [[ProfessionalKiller Assassin]]. The name is an alias and his true features are always hidden.
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