History Bibliography / AgathaChristie

31st May '16 2:52:04 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Giant's Bread'' (1930). First romance novel by Christie, who used the alias Mary Westmacott for its publication. Follows the story of Vernon Deyre from his sheltered childhood to the harsh realities of his adulthood. His father is killed in the UsefulNotes/SecondBoerWar, while Vernon himself goes on to fight in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. He spends a few years as a prisoner of war. When released, Vernon learns that everyone considers him dead and his wife has remarried. He then has to forge a new identity for himself and starts a career as an artist, but one increasingly isolated by the outside world. The novel is well-regarded due to a well developed supporting cast and their changes through the years depicted.

to:

* ''Giant's Bread'' (1930). First romance novel by Christie, who used the alias Mary Westmacott for its publication. Follows the story of Vernon Deyre from his sheltered childhood to the harsh realities of his adulthood. His father is killed in the UsefulNotes/SecondBoerWar, while Vernon himself goes on to fight in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. He spends a few years as a prisoner of war. When released, Vernon learns that everyone considers him dead and his wife has remarried. He then has to forge a new identity for himself and starts a career as an artist, but one increasingly isolated by the outside world. The novel is well-regarded due to a well developed supporting cast and their changes through the years depicted.



** ''The Hound of Death''. The eponymous story of the collection. Marie Angelique, a Belgian nun developed the "Power of Death" during UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. When her convent was invaded by German soldiers, she brought down a lightning bolt and destroyed the building and everyone within it. The local peasants discovered a "powder mark in the shape of a giant hound" on a remaining wall. Years later, the nun is the only survivor and a doctor is supposedly treating her for hallucinations. He is actually attempting to find a way to duplicate her powers, to become a superman and to bring death to his enemies.

to:

** ''The Hound of Death''. The eponymous story of the collection. Marie Angelique, a Belgian nun developed the "Power of Death" during UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. When her convent was invaded by German soldiers, she brought down a lightning bolt and destroyed the building and everyone within it. The local peasants discovered a "powder mark in the shape of a giant hound" on a remaining wall. Years later, the nun is the only survivor and a doctor is supposedly treating her for hallucinations. He is actually attempting to find a way to duplicate her powers, to become a superman and to bring death to his enemies.



** ''In a Glass Darkly''. First published in July, 1934. Supernatural story, told from the perspective of an anonymous narrator. Shortly before UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, the narrator has a strange vision in a mirror. He sees a beautiful woman strangulated by a man. He can not see the face of the killer but does notice a distinctive scar. He then meets the woman of his vision: Sylvia Carslake. Who is currently engaged to a man with a scar. He convinces her to call off the engagement. In the process the narrator falls in love with Sylvia. During World War One two things happen to the narrator: 1)he struggles with his unrequited feelings of love for Sylvia. Before managing to win her hand in marriage,2) he gets a distinctive scar of his own in the war. Following the War, the narrator is increasingly jealous of his beautiful wife and afraid she will betray him. He seems to be evolving to a CrazyJealousGuy. But is he changing to the Man in the Mirror?
** ''Problem at Sea''. First published in December, 1935. Features Hercule Poirot. Poirot travels by sea to Egypt. Aboard the ship, the Sleuth is able to observe his fellow passengers, particularly a middle-aged couple: Colonel John Clapperton and his wife Lady Adeline (formerly Lady Carrington). John used to be a music-hall performer, prior to his service in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. He was wounded and transferred to a war hospital run by Lady Carrington. The two supposedly fell in love and married. He owes his military rank and social position to her influence, something which she never really lets him forget. Currently the Colonel is a HenpeckedHusband, while the Lady has become quite insufferable in her interactions with just about anybody. When the ship reaches the port of Alexandria, Poirot and other passengers overhear a conversation between the Colonel and his wife. She has locked herself in her room and refuses to exit. He leaves and tours Alexandria in the company of his fellow passengers. When they return, they discover the corpse of Lady Adeline, stabbed to death within her locked room. Her husband is beyond suspicion since the Lady died following his departure from the ship, but Poirot suspects otherwise. [[spoiler:Clapperton had informed his fellow passengers of his music-hall career, but implied that his number involved card tricks. Poirot instead finds out that Clapperton was a [[{{Ventriloquism}} Ventriloquist]]. He killed his wife, then talked to her from outside the closed door of the room and projected her voice coming from the inside, creating an alibi for himself.]]

to:

** ''In a Glass Darkly''. First published in July, 1934. Supernatural story, told from the perspective of an anonymous narrator. Shortly before UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the narrator has a strange vision in a mirror. He sees a beautiful woman strangulated by a man. He can not see the face of the killer but does notice a distinctive scar. He then meets the woman of his vision: Sylvia Carslake. Who is currently engaged to a man with a scar. He convinces her to call off the engagement. In the process the narrator falls in love with Sylvia. During World War One two things happen to the narrator: 1)he struggles with his unrequited feelings of love for Sylvia. Before managing to win her hand in marriage,2) he gets a distinctive scar of his own in the war. Following the War, the narrator is increasingly jealous of his beautiful wife and afraid she will betray him. He seems to be evolving to a CrazyJealousGuy. But is he changing to the Man in the Mirror?
** ''Problem at Sea''. First published in December, 1935. Features Hercule Poirot. Poirot travels by sea to Egypt. Aboard the ship, the Sleuth is able to observe his fellow passengers, particularly a middle-aged couple: Colonel John Clapperton and his wife Lady Adeline (formerly Lady Carrington). John used to be a music-hall performer, prior to his service in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. He was wounded and transferred to a war hospital run by Lady Carrington. The two supposedly fell in love and married. He owes his military rank and social position to her influence, something which she never really lets him forget. Currently the Colonel is a HenpeckedHusband, while the Lady has become quite insufferable in her interactions with just about anybody. When the ship reaches the port of Alexandria, Poirot and other passengers overhear a conversation between the Colonel and his wife. She has locked herself in her room and refuses to exit. He leaves and tours Alexandria in the company of his fellow passengers. When they return, they discover the corpse of Lady Adeline, stabbed to death within her locked room. Her husband is beyond suspicion since the Lady died following his departure from the ship, but Poirot suspects otherwise. [[spoiler:Clapperton had informed his fellow passengers of his music-hall career, but implied that his number involved card tricks. Poirot instead finds out that Clapperton was a [[{{Ventriloquism}} Ventriloquist]]. He killed his wife, then talked to her from outside the closed door of the room and projected her voice coming from the inside, creating an alibi for himself.]]



** ''The Lemesurier Inheritance''. Also features Arthur Hastings. First published in December, 1923. The story involves a HereditaryCurse. Since the Middle Ages, all first-born sons in the Lemesurier family died before managing to inherit. The line always continues through the younger sons. Shortly after UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, Hastings renews his acquaintance with his army buddy Captain Vincent Lemesurier. Vincent is concerned about the curse, pointing that his father recently died in an accident. Another instance of the family curse. Not long after Vincent himself dies in an accident. A few years later, Poirot and Hastings are approached by a Mrs. Lemesurier. She is the wife of Hugo Lemesurier, current owner of the family estate. All other male members of the family died in a series of accidents over the last few years. With the exception of her own two sons and a nephew. But her eldest son has survived a number of murder attempts within the last few months, all disguised as accidents. Poirot and Hastings have a chance to save the life of the boy and break the curse. [[spoiler:While the story of the curse is genuine, all the "accidents" of the last decade or so were murders. Performed by Hugo in order to become the family heir, despite being a younger son. He had been trying to kill his own firstborn son, because at some point murder became an obsession for him. Always after another victim. ]]

to:

** ''The Lemesurier Inheritance''. Also features Arthur Hastings. First published in December, 1923. The story involves a HereditaryCurse. Since the Middle Ages, all first-born sons in the Lemesurier family died before managing to inherit. The line always continues through the younger sons. Shortly after UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, Hastings renews his acquaintance with his army buddy Captain Vincent Lemesurier. Vincent is concerned about the curse, pointing that his father recently died in an accident. Another instance of the family curse. Not long after Vincent himself dies in an accident. A few years later, Poirot and Hastings are approached by a Mrs. Lemesurier. She is the wife of Hugo Lemesurier, current owner of the family estate. All other male members of the family died in a series of accidents over the last few years. With the exception of her own two sons and a nephew. But her eldest son has survived a number of murder attempts within the last few months, all disguised as accidents. Poirot and Hastings have a chance to save the life of the boy and break the curse. [[spoiler:While the story of the curse is genuine, all the "accidents" of the last decade or so were murders. Performed by Hugo in order to become the family heir, despite being a younger son. He had been trying to kill his own firstborn son, because at some point murder became an obsession for him. Always after another victim. ]]



* ''Postern of Fate'' (1973). Mystery novel with spy thriller elements, fourth and last Literature/TommyAndTuppence Beresford novel. Also features their sidekick Albert Batt, their daughter Deborah, Colonel Ephraim Pikeaway, and Mr. Robinson. Debuts of their dog Hannibal, and grandchildren Andrew, Janet, and Rosalie. Their son Derek and adoptive daughter Betty are mentioned but not actually depicted. The novel features the protagonists as old and physically frail. The Beresfords have moved out of London and into the resort town of Hollowquay. They have bought a Victorian residence and inherited the combined libraries of several previous owners. Tuppence is eager to reacquaint herself with several favorite readings of her childhood. But one of the books contains a coded message: ''Mary Jordan did not die naturally''. A preliminary investigation reveals that Jordan died of "accidental" food poisoning shortly prior to UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. And that the author of the message was Alexander Parkinson, a would-be KidDetective who died young and under mysterious circumstances. The Beresfords decide to look for answers in a 60-year-old mystery. But though the main participants of the events are long gone, several people seem quite interested in this case. An old poem hints at what is going on : ''Have you heard That silence where the birds are dead yet something pipeth like a bird?'' [[spoiler:Mary Jordan was a British counter-intelligence agent who had infiltrated a subversive cell, orchestrated by a foreign power. She was poisoned by enemy agents. The attending physician during her last moments was actually the leader of the cell. The cell had survived to modern times under various leaderships. And they were unwilling to let anyone investigate the activities of their founders.]] The novel contains several contradictory clues and chronological references, confusing readers. An example is the character of Mrs. Griffin. She is Introduced as the godmother of Alexander Parkinson and one of few people who still remembers him. But a later chapter has her claim that the Parkinsons were active before her time. And that it was her grandmother who was close to them and not she herself.

to:

* ''Postern of Fate'' (1973). Mystery novel with spy thriller elements, fourth and last Literature/TommyAndTuppence Beresford novel. Also features their sidekick Albert Batt, their daughter Deborah, Colonel Ephraim Pikeaway, and Mr. Robinson. Debuts of their dog Hannibal, and grandchildren Andrew, Janet, and Rosalie. Their son Derek and adoptive daughter Betty are mentioned but not actually depicted. The novel features the protagonists as old and physically frail. The Beresfords have moved out of London and into the resort town of Hollowquay. They have bought a Victorian residence and inherited the combined libraries of several previous owners. Tuppence is eager to reacquaint herself with several favorite readings of her childhood. But one of the books contains a coded message: ''Mary Jordan did not die naturally''. A preliminary investigation reveals that Jordan died of "accidental" food poisoning shortly prior to UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. And that the author of the message was Alexander Parkinson, a would-be KidDetective who died young and under mysterious circumstances. The Beresfords decide to look for answers in a 60-year-old mystery. But though the main participants of the events are long gone, several people seem quite interested in this case. An old poem hints at what is going on : ''Have you heard That silence where the birds are dead yet something pipeth like a bird?'' [[spoiler:Mary Jordan was a British counter-intelligence agent who had infiltrated a subversive cell, orchestrated by a foreign power. She was poisoned by enemy agents. The attending physician during her last moments was actually the leader of the cell. The cell had survived to modern times under various leaderships. And they were unwilling to let anyone investigate the activities of their founders.]] The novel contains several contradictory clues and chronological references, confusing readers. An example is the character of Mrs. Griffin. She is Introduced as the godmother of Alexander Parkinson and one of few people who still remembers him. But a later chapter has her claim that the Parkinsons were active before her time. And that it was her grandmother who was close to them and not she herself.



** ''While the Light Lasts''. First published in April, 1924. The plot has similarities to the full novel ''Giant's Bread'' (1930). George Crozier and Deirdre were once engaged to be married. But she left him for Tim Nugent, the man she fell in love with and married. When Tim went missing in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, George took advantage and started romancing Deirdre again. The two newlyweds are traveling in Africa. But George has yet to realize that Deirdre doesn't actually love him and only sees him as a source of material comfort. Or that she is still constantly thinking about Tim and on whether she can endure a loveless existence.

to:

** ''While the Light Lasts''. First published in April, 1924. The plot has similarities to the full novel ''Giant's Bread'' (1930). George Crozier and Deirdre were once engaged to be married. But she left him for Tim Nugent, the man she fell in love with and married. When Tim went missing in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, George took advantage and started romancing Deirdre again. The two newlyweds are traveling in Africa. But George has yet to realize that Deirdre doesn't actually love him and only sees him as a source of material comfort. Or that she is still constantly thinking about Tim and on whether she can endure a loveless existence.
24th May '16 1:33:15 AM yisfidri
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The Body in the Library'' (1942). Second ''Literature/MissMarple'' novel. Also features Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife Dolly Bantry, Sir Henry Clithering, Colonel Melchett, and Detective Inspector Slack . Someone has murdered teenaged dancer Ruby Keene, and apparently dumped her body in the library room of Gossington hall, the Bantry family house. The villagers in St. Mary Mead start isolating Arthur, suspecting him of killing the girl. Jane Marple has [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. The case gets more complicated when it is discovered that Ruby is not the only teenaged girl missing. Pamela Reeves, a teenaged girl guide, is gone. She was a look-alike of Ruby.

to:

* ''The Body in the Library'' ''Literature/TheBodyInTheLibrary'' (1942). Second ''Literature/MissMarple'' novel. Also features Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife Dolly Bantry, Sir Henry Clithering, Colonel Melchett, and Detective Inspector Slack . Someone has murdered teenaged dancer Ruby Keene, and apparently dumped her body in the library room of Gossington hall, the Bantry family house. The villagers in St. Mary Mead start isolating Arthur, suspecting him of killing the girl. Jane Marple has [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. The case gets more complicated when it is discovered that Ruby is not the only teenaged girl missing. Pamela Reeves, a teenaged girl guide, is gone. She was a look-alike of Ruby.
20th May '16 3:53:33 AM yisfidri
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Cat Among the Pigeons'' (1959). Twenty-eighth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features new characters Colonel Ephrem Pikeaway and Mr. Robinson, heads of the Special Branch (Secret Service). Both would play small parts in a number of later novels.The introduction takes place in the FictionalCountry of Ramat, somewhere in UsefulNotes/TheMiddleEast. There is an ongoing revolution and Prince Ali Yusuf decides to smuggle part of the royal jewels out of the country. His personal pilot Bob Rawlinson manages to hide the jewels in the luggage of his departing sister and niece. Shortly after, both men are killed. The action shifts to Meadowbank School, a [[OneGenderSchool all-girl boarding school]] which happens to include among its students both Jennifer Sutcliffe (niece of Rawlinson) and Princess Shaista (cousin and betrothed of Prince Ali). The jewels have ended here and thieves and killers seem to have infiltrated the place. Meanwhile, long-serving headmistress Honoria Bulstrode has reached retirement age and tries to decide on a successor. With several staff members jockeying for the position. The novel benefits from a strong cast of female teachers and students. The character dynamics and their various secrets tend to overshadow the espionage aspects of the story.

to:

* ''Cat Among the Pigeons'' ''Literature/CatAmongThePigeons'' (1959). Twenty-eighth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features new characters Colonel Ephrem Pikeaway and Mr. Robinson, heads of the Special Branch (Secret Service). Both would play small parts in a number of later novels.The introduction takes place in the FictionalCountry of Ramat, somewhere in UsefulNotes/TheMiddleEast. There is an ongoing revolution and Prince Ali Yusuf decides to smuggle part of the royal jewels out of the country. His personal pilot Bob Rawlinson manages to hide the jewels in the luggage of his departing sister and niece. Shortly after, both men are killed. The action shifts to Meadowbank School, a [[OneGenderSchool all-girl boarding school]] which happens to include among its students both Jennifer Sutcliffe (niece of Rawlinson) and Princess Shaista (cousin and betrothed of Prince Ali). The jewels have ended here and thieves and killers seem to have infiltrated the place. Meanwhile, long-serving headmistress Honoria Bulstrode has reached retirement age and tries to decide on a successor. With several staff members jockeying for the position. The novel benefits from a strong cast of female teachers and students. The character dynamics and their various secrets tend to overshadow the espionage aspects of the story.
20th May '16 3:40:21 AM yisfidri
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The Murder on the Links'' (1923). Second Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings. First appearance of Dulcie Duveen, nicknamed "Cinderella" or "Cinders". She is mentioned in later novels as Hastings' wife.

to:

* ''The Murder on the Links'' ''Literature/TheMurderOnTheLinks'' (1923). Second Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings. First appearance of Dulcie Duveen, nicknamed "Cinderella" or "Cinders". She is mentioned in later novels as Hastings' wife.



* ''Murder in Mesopotamia'' (1936). Twelfth Hercule Poirot novel. The action takes place in UsefulNotes/{{Iraq}} and an archaeological excavation features prominently in the plot.
* ''Cards on the Table'' (1936). Thirteenth Hercule Poirot novel. In a prominent case of CanonWelding for Christie works, Poirot teams up with Colonel Race, Superintendent Battle, and Ariadne Oliver. Christie also intended the novel as a narrative experiment, subverting the EveryoneIsASuspect mentality of her previous novels. There are only four suspects in the murder case featured, considered to be "the lowest number in any Christie novel".

to:

* ''Murder in Mesopotamia'' ''Literature/MurderInMesopotamia'' (1936). Twelfth Hercule Poirot novel. The action takes place in UsefulNotes/{{Iraq}} and an archaeological excavation features prominently in the plot.
* ''Cards on the Table'' ''Literature/CardsOnTheTable'' (1936). Thirteenth Hercule Poirot novel. In a prominent case of CanonWelding for Christie works, Poirot teams up with Colonel Race, Superintendent Battle, and Ariadne Oliver. Christie also intended the novel as a narrative experiment, subverting the EveryoneIsASuspect mentality of her previous novels. There are only four suspects in the murder case featured, considered to be "the lowest number in any Christie novel".



* ''Death Comes as the End'' (1944). A mystery novel set in AncientEgypt. Renisenb, a young widow, returns to the estate of her father. Bringing along Teti, her own young daughter. She has to reacquaint herself with her brothers, sister-in-laws, and elder relatives. Having the illusion that nothing much has changed, though there are clearly tensions among the family members. Something does change when Imhotep, the widowed pater familias, introduces his new concubine to the family: Nofret, a 19-year-old beauty from Memphis. She does not get along with the other family members and tensions turn to regular fights. When Nofret is found murdered, it is only the first of many deaths in this closed family setting. There are two basic questions: "who is responsible?", and "who is next?". This book is considered the first full-length novel in the HistoricalWhodunnit sub-genre, a combination of HistoricalFiction and MysteryFiction. The main criticism of this novel has been that it has a rather high body count, second only to AndThenThereWereNone, and that the suspects keep getting eliminated. By the time the mystery concludes, there aren't many viable suspects available.

to:

* ''Death Comes as the End'' ''Literature/DeathComesAsTheEnd'' (1944). A mystery novel set in AncientEgypt. Renisenb, a young widow, returns to the estate of her father. Bringing along Teti, her own young daughter. She has to reacquaint herself with her brothers, sister-in-laws, and elder relatives. Having the illusion that nothing much has changed, though there are clearly tensions among the family members. Something does change when Imhotep, the widowed pater familias, introduces his new concubine to the family: Nofret, a 19-year-old beauty from Memphis. She does not get along with the other family members and tensions turn to regular fights. When Nofret is found murdered, it is only the first of many deaths in this closed family setting. There are two basic questions: "who is responsible?", and "who is next?". This book is considered the first full-length novel in the HistoricalWhodunnit sub-genre, a combination of HistoricalFiction and MysteryFiction. The main criticism of this novel has been that it has a rather high body count, second only to AndThenThereWereNone, and that the suspects keep getting eliminated. By the time the mystery concludes, there aren't many viable suspects available.



* ''The Mirror Crack'd from Side to Side'' (1962), title often shortened to ''The Mirror Crack'd''. The title and its spelling derive from ''The Lady of Shalott'' (1833, revised 1842) by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Eighth Miss Marple novel. The novel is set in St. Mary Mead, the home village of Miss Marple. Previously it served as the main setting of ''Literature/MurderAtTheVicarage" (1930) and ''The Body in the Library'' (1942) , but had not appeared in any Marple novel since then. The novel calls attention to the village having underwent great changes over the last two decades. Reverend Leonard Clement and Colonel Arthur Bantry, major characters of the previous novels, are dead. Their widows survive them. But Griselda Clement has moved out of the village and Dolly has sold her own mansion, living alone in the much smaller Eastern Lodge. Other familiar faces are also gone and new ones have moved in. Gossington Hall, former house of the Bantry family, has been bought by famous actress Marina Gregg. Who has renovated it to include a swimming pool, indoor bathrooms, running water and other modern luxuries. But some things never change, murder among them. When Heather Badcock visits Gossington Hall and dies poisoned, Marple has a new case to solve. The novel was the last of several "village mysteries" written by Christie, and pays attention to the changes the British countryside was undergoing. Marina Gregg and her storyline were loosely based on the life account of actress Creator/GeneTierney.

to:

* ''The Mirror Crack'd from Side to Side'' ''Literature/TheMirrorCrackdFromSideToSide'' (1962), title often shortened to ''The Mirror Crack'd''. The title and its spelling derive from ''The Lady of Shalott'' (1833, revised 1842) by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Eighth Miss Marple novel. The novel is set in St. Mary Mead, the home village of Miss Marple. Previously it served as the main setting of ''Literature/MurderAtTheVicarage" (1930) and ''The Body in the Library'' (1942) , but had not appeared in any Marple novel since then. The novel calls attention to the village having underwent great changes over the last two decades. Reverend Leonard Clement and Colonel Arthur Bantry, major characters of the previous novels, are dead. Their widows survive them. But Griselda Clement has moved out of the village and Dolly has sold her own mansion, living alone in the much smaller Eastern Lodge. Other familiar faces are also gone and new ones have moved in. Gossington Hall, former house of the Bantry family, has been bought by famous actress Marina Gregg. Who has renovated it to include a swimming pool, indoor bathrooms, running water and other modern luxuries. But some things never change, murder among them. When Heather Badcock visits Gossington Hall and dies poisoned, Marple has a new case to solve. The novel was the last of several "village mysteries" written by Christie, and pays attention to the changes the British countryside was undergoing. Marina Gregg and her storyline were loosely based on the life account of actress Creator/GeneTierney.



* ''Curtain'' (1975). Thirty-third and last Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, and his daughter Judith. Written in the early [[TheForties 1940s]] intended to be the series' finale. Poirot is suffering from arthritis, while Hastings is widowed. But they return to Styles Court, to resolve [[OneLastJob One Last Case]]. That of a SerialKiller involved in at least five murder cases, with no evidence linking him/her to any of the victims. [[spoiler:The "killer" Stephen Norton has not actually killed anyone with his own hands. He is a ManipulativeBastard who models himself after Iago from ''Theatre/{{Othello}}''. He pushes everyone's buttons, driving them to commit murder. The novel ends with Poirot killing Norton and committing suicide]]. The novel is often praised for its constant manipulation of reader's perceptions, leading towards a large number of twists at its finale. And for its purpose as a dramatic finale for the series' characters. On the other hand, most of the characters introduced in this novel are considered rather pale.

to:

* ''Curtain'' ''Literature/{{Curtain}}'' (1975). Thirty-third and last Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, and his daughter Judith. Written in the early [[TheForties 1940s]] intended to be the series' finale. Poirot is suffering from arthritis, while Hastings is widowed. But they return to Styles Court, to resolve [[OneLastJob One Last Case]]. That of a SerialKiller involved in at least five murder cases, with no evidence linking him/her to any of the victims. [[spoiler:The "killer" Stephen Norton has not actually killed anyone with his own hands. He is a ManipulativeBastard who models himself after Iago from ''Theatre/{{Othello}}''. He pushes everyone's buttons, driving them to commit murder. The novel ends with Poirot killing Norton and committing suicide]]. The novel is often praised for its constant manipulation of reader's perceptions, leading towards a large number of twists at its finale. And for its purpose as a dramatic finale for the series' characters. On the other hand, most of the characters introduced in this novel are considered rather pale.
15th May '16 6:36:34 PM NightShade96
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A complete list of works by Creator/AgathaChristie, for convenience sake.

to:

A complete list of works by Creator/AgathaChristie, for convenience convenience's sake.



* ''The Man in the Brown Suit'' (1924). Christie's second spy thriller novel. The protagonist is Anne Beddingfield, an AmateurSleuth. Other major characters are Sir Eustace Pedler, MP, and Colonel Race of the Secret Service . Anne and Eustace also serve as narrators of several chapters. The novel is notable as one of the narrators turns out to be the villainous mastermind. A first for Christie.

to:

* ''The Man in the Brown Suit'' (1924). Christie's second spy thriller novel. The protagonist is Anne Beddingfield, an AmateurSleuth. Other major characters are Sir Eustace Pedler, MP, and Colonel Race of the Secret Service . Anne and Eustace also serve as narrators of several chapters. The novel is notable as one [[spoiler:one of the narrators turns out to be the villainous mastermind. A mastermind]], a first for Christie.



** ''A Masque from Italy''. Ten poems covering themes from the CommediaDellArte. The dominant figure here is Harlequin. Making the poems precursors to Christie's short stories featuring Mr. Harley Quinn.

to:

** ''A Masque from Italy''. Ten poems covering themes from the CommediaDellArte. The dominant figure here is Harlequin. Making Harlequin, making the poems precursors to Christie's short stories featuring Mr. Harley Quinn.



* ''The Mystery of the Blue Train'' (1928). Fifth Hercule Poirot novel. First appearance for Mr. Goby, a KnowledgeBroker employed by Poirot. "Give him twenty-four hours and he would lay the private life of the Archbishop of Canterbury bare for you". First appearance of George ("Georges"), Poirot's unimaginitive valet. Although most of the action takes place in the French Riviera, a scene takes place in the English village of St. Mary Meade. Which would feature prominently in the Miss Marple novels.
* ''The Seven Dials Mystery'' (1929). A sequel to ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Lady Eileen "Bundle" Brent investigates a series of murders. Superintendent Battle, and Bill Eversleigh also return. Two new Amateur Detectives are added to the cast: Jimmy Thesiger and Elaine Wade. (''[[spoiler: They are actually the two murderers, trying to cover their tracks]]''). The story contains an early use of the DetectiveMole plot.
* ''Partners in Crime'' (1929). A short story collection featuring Tommy and Tuppence Beresford, now married to each other. Albert Batt, their sidekick, also returns. The frame story has the Secret Service discovering that "The International Detective Agency" is actually a front for spies. The owner is arrested and Tommy is asked to impersonate him. Tuppence posing as his secretary. While they wait for spies to contact them, the two are assigned actual detective cases. Tommy finds the opportunity to imitate his favorite fictional detectives. A total of 14 short stories were revised and included in the collection. They had been published in magazines between 1923 and 1928. Christie found the opportunity to parody several popular authors of her time.

to:

* ''The Mystery of the Blue Train'' (1928). Fifth Hercule Poirot novel. First appearance for Mr. Goby, a KnowledgeBroker employed by Poirot. Poirot "Give him twenty-four hours and he would lay the private life of the Archbishop of Canterbury bare for you". First appearance of George ("Georges"), Poirot's unimaginitive valet. Although most of the action takes place in the French Riviera, a scene takes place in the English village of St. Mary Meade. Which Meade, which would feature prominently in the Miss Marple novels.
* ''The Seven Dials Mystery'' (1929). A sequel to ''The Secret of Chimneys''. Lady Eileen "Bundle" Brent investigates a series of murders. Superintendent Battle, and Bill Eversleigh also return. Two new Amateur Detectives are added to the cast: Jimmy Thesiger and Elaine Wade. (''[[spoiler: They (''[[spoiler:They are actually the two murderers, trying to cover their tracks]]''). The story contains an early use of the DetectiveMole plot.
* ''Partners in Crime'' (1929). A short story collection featuring Tommy and Tuppence Beresford, now married to each other. Albert Batt, their sidekick, also returns. The frame story has the Secret Service discovering that "The International Detective Agency" is actually a front for spies. The owner is arrested and Tommy is asked to impersonate him. him, with Tuppence posing as his secretary. While they wait for spies to contact them, the two are assigned actual detective cases. Tommy finds the opportunity to imitate his favorite fictional detectives. A total of 14 short stories were revised and included in the collection. They had been published in magazines between 1923 and 1928. Christie found the opportunity to parody several popular authors of her time.



* ''Literature/TheMysteriousMrQuin'' (1930). A short story collection featuring Mr. Harley Quin and Mr. Satterthwaite. Harley Quin is a supernatural version of the Harlequin from the CommediaDellArte, a "magical figure" with symbolic dimensions connected to both love and death. He appears to provide inspiration to Satterthwaite, a mortal, elderly AmateurSleuth. Satterthwaite is an aging socialite, and keen observer of human nature. He spend most of his life observing people from a distance, but now finds himself reuniting pairs of lovers and investigating murder mysteries. The 12 stories included were written between 1924 and 1929. Eleven had been published in magazines, but one seems to have had no previous appearance. The stories explore the extremes of love and death, and the final one contains horror elements.

to:

* ''Literature/TheMysteriousMrQuin'' (1930). A short story collection featuring Mr. Harley Quin and Mr. Satterthwaite. Harley Quin is a supernatural version of the Harlequin from the CommediaDellArte, a "magical figure" with symbolic dimensions connected to both love and death. He appears to provide inspiration to Satterthwaite, a mortal, elderly AmateurSleuth. Satterthwaite is an aging socialite, and a keen observer of human nature. He spend spent most of his life observing people from a distance, but now finds himself reuniting pairs of lovers and investigating murder mysteries. The 12 stories included were written between 1924 and 1929. Eleven had been published in magazines, but one seems to have had no previous appearance. The stories explore the extremes of love and death, and the final one contains horror elements.



* ''Giant's Bread'' (1930). First romance novel by Christie, who used the alias Mary Westmacott for its publication. Follows the story of Vernon Deyre from his sheltered childhood to the harsh realities of his adulthood. His father is killed in the UsefulNotes/SecondBoerWar, while Vernon himself goes on to fight in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. He spends a few years as a prisoner of war. When released, Vernon learns that everyone considers him dead and his wife has remarried. He then has to forge a new identity for himself and starts a career as an artist. But one increasingly isolated by the outside world. The novel is well-regarded due to a well developed supporting cast and their changes through the years depicted.

to:

* ''Giant's Bread'' (1930). First romance novel by Christie, who used the alias Mary Westmacott for its publication. Follows the story of Vernon Deyre from his sheltered childhood to the harsh realities of his adulthood. His father is killed in the UsefulNotes/SecondBoerWar, while Vernon himself goes on to fight in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. He spends a few years as a prisoner of war. When released, Vernon learns that everyone considers him dead and his wife has remarried. He then has to forge a new identity for himself and starts a career as an artist. But artist, but one increasingly isolated by the outside world. The novel is well-regarded due to a well developed supporting cast and their changes through the years depicted.



* ''The Sittaford Mystery'' (1931). A mystery novel. The main characters are Emily Trefusis, and Charles Enderby. Trefusis is a young model whose fiancée has been framed for a murder and she intends to [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. Enderby is a professional journalist who acts as her partner, partly to get a scoop, partly because he has the hots for her. The Dartmoor, Devon, setting and some story elements have the story frequently compared to ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' (1902), a Literature/SherlockHolmes novel. Though, it should be noted that Devon is the setting for several Christie stories, most notably ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''.
* ''The Floating Admiral'' (1931). A collaborative novel written by 14 members of the Detection Club, Christie included. The initial setting has Admiral Penistone discovered floating down the river on a small bot, stabbed to death. Inspector Rudger investigates the murder, but soon notices that several persons involved in the case act in particularly suspicious ways. Each author agreed to contribute a new chapter, with new clues and a new direction to the story. While building on the clues of the others. Each had their own solution, though only one became "official" at the finale. In order of writing the authors were: 1) Creator/GKChesterton, 2) Victor Whitechurch, 3) George Douglas Howard Cole, 4) Margaret Cole, 5) Henry Wade, 6) Agatha Christie, 7) "John Rode", actually an alias for Major Cecil John Charles Street, 8) Milward Kennedy, 9) Creator/DorothyLSayers, 10) Ronald Knox, 11) Freeman Wills Crofts, 12) Edgar Jepson, 13) "Clemence Dane", actually an alias for Winifred Ashton, and 14) Anthony Berkeley Cox.
* ''Literature/PerilAtEndHouse'' (1932). Sixth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings and Inspector Japp. The novel has a subplot concerning drug use and the 1930s drug culture. Several of the characters (and suspects) are cocaine users, one is clearly an addict, and one happens to de a drug dealer.

to:

* ''The Sittaford Mystery'' (1931). A mystery novel. The main characters are Emily Trefusis, and Charles Enderby. Trefusis is a young model whose fiancée has been framed for a murder and she intends to [[ClearTheirName Clear His Name]]. Enderby is a professional journalist who acts as her partner, partly to get a scoop, partly because he has the hots for her. The Dartmoor, Devon, Devon setting and some story elements have the story frequently compared to ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' (1902), a Literature/SherlockHolmes novel. Though, novel, though it should be noted that Devon is the setting for several Christie stories, most notably ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone''.
* ''The Floating Admiral'' (1931). A collaborative novel written by 14 members of the Detection Club, Christie included. The initial setting has Admiral Penistone discovered floating down the river on a small bot, stabbed to death. Inspector Rudger investigates the murder, but soon notices that several persons involved in the case act in particularly suspicious ways. Each author agreed to contribute a new chapter, with new clues and a new direction to the story. While story, while building on the clues of the others. Each had their own solution, though only one became "official" at the finale. In order of writing the authors were: 1) Creator/GKChesterton, 2) Victor Whitechurch, 3) George Douglas Howard Cole, 4) Margaret Cole, 5) Henry Wade, 6) Agatha Christie, 7) "John Rode", actually an alias for Major Cecil John Charles Street, 8) Milward Kennedy, 9) Creator/DorothyLSayers, 10) Ronald Knox, 11) Freeman Wills Crofts, 12) Edgar Jepson, 13) "Clemence Dane", actually an alias for Winifred Ashton, and 14) Anthony Berkeley Cox.
* ''Literature/PerilAtEndHouse'' (1932). Sixth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings and Inspector Japp. The novel has a subplot concerning drug use and the 1930s drug culture. Several of the characters (and suspects) are cocaine users, one is clearly an addict, and one happens to de be a drug dealer.



** ''The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael''. A WickedStepmother tale with undertones of witchcraft. Dr. Edward Carstairs, a noted psychologist, is assigned a particularly strange case. His patient is Sir Arthur Carmichael, a young man who had inherited a vast fortune. He was about to marry when he started behaving like a cat. There is nothing human about his behavior. Meanwhile, the only real cat of the estate was killed and buried. But its spectre seems to be haunting the place and targeting Lady Carmichael, stepmother to Sir Arthur. Who would like her own son to inherite the family fortune. And has a peculiar interest in occult books, particularly those concerning transferring human souls to the bodies of animals.

to:

** ''The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael''. A WickedStepmother tale with undertones of witchcraft. Dr. Edward Carstairs, a noted psychologist, is assigned a particularly strange case. His patient is Sir Arthur Carmichael, a young man who had inherited a vast fortune. He was about to marry when he started behaving like a cat. There is nothing human about his behavior. Meanwhile, the only real cat of the estate was killed and buried. But buried, but its spectre seems to be haunting the place and targeting Lady Carmichael, stepmother to Sir Arthur. Who Arthur, who would like her own son to inherite inherit the family fortune. And She has a peculiar interest in occult books, particularly those concerning transferring human souls to the bodies of animals.



** ''The Last Seance''. First published in November, 1926. Madame Simone Daubreuil is young, beautiful, and arguably the most successful medium in France. But the mental, emotional, and physical strain of her occupation worries her fiancé Raoul Daubreuil. He insists that she retires. But for Simone there is OneLastJob, one last SpookySeance she must perform before retirement. She has promised a grieving mother that she will recall the spirit, the flesh, and the blood of her lost son. But this Seance has a chance of turning lethal for its participants.
** ''SOS''. First published in February, 1926. Mortimer Cleveland, a psychic researcher, is in the Wiltshire countryside when his car breaks down. It is a rainy and misty night and there is no town nearby. So he seeks shelter in the closest residence. The Dinsmeads, his hosts, seem decent enough. But his senses alert him to murder in the air. Someone is about to be poisoned.

to:

** ''The Last Seance''. First published in November, 1926. Madame Simone Daubreuil is young, beautiful, and arguably the most successful medium in France. But France, but the mental, emotional, and physical strain of her occupation worries her fiancé Raoul Daubreuil. He insists that she retires. But retire, but for Simone there is OneLastJob, one last SpookySeance she must perform before retirement. She has promised a grieving mother that she will recall the spirit, the flesh, and the blood of her lost son. But son, but this Seance has a chance of turning lethal for its participants.
** ''SOS''. First published in February, 1926. Mortimer Cleveland, a psychic researcher, is in the Wiltshire countryside when his car breaks down. It is a rainy and misty night and there is no town nearby. So nearby, so he seeks shelter in the closest residence. The Dinsmeads, his hosts, seem decent enough. But enough, but his senses alert him to murder in the air. Someone is about to be poisoned.



* ''Unfinished Portrait'' (1934). Second romance novel by Christie, using the alias Mary Westmacott. Contains strong auto-biographical elements. The story introduces the character Celia, an imaginitive, introverted, and dependent girl. The story covers her sheltered childhood, and emotional attachment to her strong mother Miriam. She becomes essential in Celia's life well into young adulthood. Even when Celia gets her own husband and child. Celia starts her own writing career. But then her sheltered world is shattered. First Miriam dies, then her husband leaves her for another woman, demanding a divorce. At this point Celia is physically ill, emotionally distraught, and contemplating suicide. She chooses an exotic island as the stage for her final act. But there meets Larraby, a portrait painter. They have a long discussion over her deepest fears, her loneliness. Celia comes to realize that she is still able to cope with her problems, and that her life isn't over yet.

to:

* ''Unfinished Portrait'' (1934). Second romance novel by Christie, using the alias Mary Westmacott. Contains It contains strong auto-biographical elements. The story introduces the character Celia, an imaginitive, imaginative, introverted, and dependent girl. The story covers her sheltered childhood, and emotional attachment to her strong mother Miriam. She becomes essential in Celia's life well into young adulthood. Even adulthood, even when Celia gets her own husband and child. Celia starts her own writing career. But career, but then her sheltered world is shattered. First Miriam dies, then her husband leaves her for another woman, demanding a divorce. At this point Celia is physically ill, emotionally distraught, and contemplating suicide. She chooses an exotic island as the stage for her final act. But act, but there she meets Larraby, a portrait painter. They have a long discussion over her deepest fears, her loneliness. Celia comes to realize that she is still able to cope with her problems, and that her life isn't over yet.



** ''The Listerdale Mystery''. The eponymous story of the collection. First published in December, 1925. The protagonists are middle-aged widow Mrs St. Vincent, and her adult children Rupert and Barbara. They were once a rather wealthy family. But then the pater familias' poorly-thought investments bankrupted them. Said pater-familias died shortly after. Currently, the St. Vincents are members of the [[ImpoverishedPatrician genteel poor]], sustaining themselves on the meager salary of Rupert. While searching for a house, Mrs. Saint Vincent comes across a surprisingly good offer. A furnished villa with a nominal rent. She rents the place and finds that the residence comes along with Quentin the Butler (highly efficient), two servants, and regular meals every day. All expenses paid, courtesy of the mysterious owner. Rupert gets suspicious and tries to find who the owner actually is. The answer causes even more suspicions. Lord Listerdale, an aristocrat who has not been seen or heard in 18 months. His estate is currently administrated by a cousin. Rupert starts fearing that the Lord has never actually left the residence and that a corpse could be hidden under the floorboards. [[spoiler: "Quentin" is eventually discovered to be Lord Listerdale himself, serving others is part of his road to redemption for a thoroughly selfish life. He is also interested in RomancingTheWidow. ]]
** ''Philomel Cottage''. First published in November, 1924. By far the most successful short-story in the collection. In 1936, it was adapted to the theatrical play ''Love from a Stranger'' by Frank Vosper. The play then received two film adaptations, one in 1937 and the other in 1947. It has also been adapted several times for television and radio. Alix Martin is a shorthand typist, long romantically attached to co-worker Dick Windyford. Neither is financially secure and they have agreed to postpone marriage until their status is improved. Then Alix inherits money from a distant cousin. Dick still won't marry her, refusing to be financially supported by his wife. They break up, then Alix has a whirlwind romance with Gerald Martin. Marrying shortly following their first meeting. Dick warns her about the dangers of marrying a stranger, since she truly knows nothing of Gerald. The new couple move to Philomel Cottage, a modern but isolated residence. Not long after, Alix notices suspicious behavior by Gerald. She starts fearing that Gerald is actually Charles Le- Maitre, a [[TheBluebeard Bluebeard-like]] SerialKiller. While she has a dream of Gerald's own dead body. Who is killing who in this story remains uncertain until its climax. The story includes more than one AmbiguousSituation, and has a famously ambiguous finale. [[spoiler:Alix tells Gerald that he is her third husband, and that she poisoned the previous two. Making her a BlackWidow. That there is a reason that his morning coffee was bitter, and that the poison used causes heart failure. Gerald dies terrified. It is left unclear if she told him a false story, to scare him to death. Or if she was telling the truth and actually poisoned him.]]
** ''The Girl in the Train''. First published in February, 1924. The protagonist is George Rowland. Nephew, employee, and probable heir of a wealthy businessman, George has a taste for late-night partying. Following one such party, George oversleeps and is late for work. His uncle both fires him and has him disinherited. George decides to move out of the family house, though he has no clear plans on a destination. He takes the train from Waterloo. He is initially alone. But then a young girl jumps on the train and asks him to help her hide. He helps her escape from a foreign man claiming to be her uncle. The girl introduces herself as Elizabeth. She disembarks at the next stop, but entrusts him with safeguarding a mysterious package. George soon learns that he might have just helped either the Grand Duchess Anastasia of Catonia escape her family, or the accomplice of a foreign spy escape the Scotland Yard. Either way, this is only the beginning of his adventure. He accidentally gets himself involved in both cases.

to:

** ''The Listerdale Mystery''. The eponymous story of the collection. First published in December, 1925. The protagonists are middle-aged widow Mrs St. Vincent, and her adult children Rupert and Barbara. They were once a rather wealthy family. But family, but then the pater familias' poorly-thought investments bankrupted them. Said pater-familias died shortly after. Currently, the St. Vincents are members of the [[ImpoverishedPatrician genteel poor]], sustaining themselves on the meager salary of Rupert. While searching for a house, Mrs. Saint Vincent comes across a surprisingly good offer. A offer, a furnished villa with a nominal rent. She rents the place and finds that the residence comes along with Quentin the Butler (highly efficient), two servants, and regular meals every day. All day, with all expenses paid, courtesy of the mysterious owner. Rupert gets suspicious and tries to find who the owner actually is. The answer causes even more suspicions. suspicions, as it is Lord Listerdale, an aristocrat who has not been seen or heard in 18 months. His estate is currently administrated by a cousin. Rupert starts fearing that the Lord has never actually left the residence and that a corpse could be hidden under the floorboards. [[spoiler: "Quentin" is eventually discovered to be Lord Listerdale himself, serving others is part of his road to redemption for a thoroughly selfish life. He is also interested in RomancingTheWidow. ]]
** ''Philomel Cottage''. First published in November, 1924. By far the most successful short-story in the collection. In 1936, it was adapted to the theatrical play ''Love from a Stranger'' by Frank Vosper. The play then received two film adaptations, one in 1937 and the other in 1947. It has also been adapted several times for television and radio. Alix Martin is a shorthand typist, long romantically attached to co-worker Dick Windyford. Neither is financially secure and they have agreed to postpone marriage until their status is improved. Then Alix inherits money from a distant cousin. Dick still won't marry her, refusing to be financially supported by his wife. They break up, then Alix has a whirlwind romance with Gerald Martin. Marrying Martin, marrying shortly following their first meeting. Dick warns her about the dangers of marrying a stranger, since she truly knows nothing of Gerald. The new couple move to Philomel Cottage, a modern but isolated residence. Not long after, Alix notices suspicious behavior by Gerald. She starts fearing that Gerald is actually Charles Le- Maitre, a [[TheBluebeard Bluebeard-like]] SerialKiller. While she has a dream of Gerald's own dead body. Who body, who is killing who in this story remains uncertain until its climax. The story includes more than one AmbiguousSituation, and has a famously ambiguous finale. [[spoiler:Alix tells Gerald that he is her third husband, and that she poisoned the previous two. Making her a BlackWidow. That there is a reason that his morning coffee was bitter, and that the poison used causes heart failure. Gerald dies terrified. It is left unclear if she told him a false story, to scare him to death. Or death, or if she was telling the truth and actually poisoned him.]]
** ''The Girl in the Train''. First published in February, 1924. The protagonist is George Rowland. Nephew, Rowland, nephew, employee, and probable heir of a wealthy businessman, George has a taste for late-night partying. Following one such party, George oversleeps and is late for work. His uncle both fires him and has him disinherited. George decides to move out of the family house, though he has no clear plans on a destination. He takes the train from Waterloo. He Waterloo and is initially alone. But alone, but then a young girl jumps on the train and asks him to help her hide. He helps her escape from a foreign man claiming to be her uncle. The girl introduces herself as Elizabeth. She Elizabeth, and she disembarks at the next stop, but entrusts him with safeguarding a mysterious package. George soon learns that he might have just helped either the Grand Duchess Anastasia of Catonia escape her family, or the accomplice of a foreign spy escape the Scotland Yard. Either way, this is only the beginning of his adventure. He accidentally gets himself involved in both cases.



** ''Jane in Search of a Job''. First published in August, 1924. The protagonist is Jane Cleveland. She is a 26-year-old woman, "intelligent and good-looking and well-educated". But currently unemployed and broke. Searching for a job, she finds one ad seeking a girl which matches her description: "a young lady of twenty-five to thirty years of age, eyes dark blue, very fair hair, black lashes and brows, straight nose, slim figure, height five feet seven inches, good mimic and able to speak French". Jane is only five feet six inches, but applies to the add. And gets the job. She has to play the decoy for her look-alike Grand Duchess Pauline of Ostrova. An exiled aristocrat who is obligated to make public appearances, but fears being the target of assassins and kidnappers. Jane got herself a dangerous job, and the plot soon thickens. The scene seems set up for a DecoyGetaway, but Pauline has a couple of secrets. [[spoiler:While there is an actual Grand Duchess Pauline, the woman Jane works for is actually an "American Girl Bandit" impersonating her to perform crimes. She intends to have Jane framed for said crimes. ]]

to:

** ''Jane in Search of a Job''. First published in August, 1924. The protagonist is Jane Cleveland. She is a 26-year-old woman, "intelligent and good-looking and well-educated". But well-educated", but currently unemployed and broke. Searching for a job, she finds one ad seeking a girl which matches her description: "a young lady of twenty-five to thirty years of age, eyes dark blue, very fair hair, black lashes and brows, straight nose, slim figure, height five feet seven inches, good mimic and able to speak French". Jane is only five feet six inches, but applies to the add. And add, and gets the job. She has to play the decoy for her look-alike Grand Duchess Pauline of Ostrova. An Ostrova, an exiled aristocrat who is obligated to make public appearances, but fears being the target of assassins and kidnappers. Jane got herself a dangerous job, and the plot soon thickens. The scene seems set up for a DecoyGetaway, but Pauline has a couple of secrets. [[spoiler:While there is an actual Grand Duchess Pauline, the woman Jane works for is actually an "American Girl Bandit" impersonating her to perform crimes. She intends to have Jane framed for said crimes. ]]



** ''Swan Song''. First published in September, 1926. A {{Revenge}} story with elements deriving from a famous {{Opera}}. There is no singular protagonist. The main characters are Madame Paula Nazorkoff, Edouard Bréon, and Blanche Amery. Paula is a "famous operatic star", reputedly of Russian origin. When her agent arranged for a small number of London appearances for her, Paula insists that a performance of ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' is included. Edouard is a "famous French baritone", currently retired. He is offered the role of Scarpia, to serve as his swan song. He accepts, and is glad to compare the voice of Paula to that of Bianca Capelli, a talented Italian singer whose career ended early. Bianca's lover was a member of the [[TheMafia camorra]], who was arrested and executed. Bianca retired to a convent shortly thereafter. Blanche is a 24-year-old English woman, daughter of a Lady. Who soon notices some peculiarities in both singers and in the story she heard. During the performance, the famous scene where Tosca stabs Scarpia to death gets a rather realistic re-enactment. Paula stabs Edouard to death. People wonder why, and whether it was an accident. But Blanche realizes the truth. [[spoiler:Paula Nazorkoff and Bianca Capelli are the same person. Eduard was partially responsible for the death of her lover, and Paula/Bianca knew it. Paula had insisted on a performance of ''Tosca'', specifically to get her revenge. ]]

to:

** ''Swan Song''. First published in September, 1926. A {{Revenge}} story with elements deriving from a famous {{Opera}}. There is no singular protagonist. The main characters are Madame Paula Nazorkoff, Edouard Bréon, and Blanche Amery. Paula is a "famous operatic star", reputedly of Russian origin. When her agent arranged for a small number of London appearances for her, Paula insists that a performance of ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' is included. Edouard is a "famous French baritone", currently retired. He is offered the role of Scarpia, to serve as his swan song. He accepts, and is glad to compare the voice of Paula to that of Bianca Capelli, a talented Italian singer whose career ended early. Bianca's lover was a member of the [[TheMafia camorra]], who was arrested and executed. Bianca retired to a convent shortly thereafter. Blanche is a 24-year-old English woman, daughter of a Lady. Who Lady, who soon notices some peculiarities in both singers and in the story she heard. During the performance, the famous scene where Tosca stabs Scarpia to death gets a rather realistic re-enactment. Paula stabs Edouard to death. People wonder why, and whether it was an accident. But accident, but Blanche realizes the truth. [[spoiler:Paula Nazorkoff and Bianca Capelli are the same person. Eduard was partially responsible for the death of her lover, and Paula/Bianca knew it. Paula had insisted on a performance of ''Tosca'', specifically to get her revenge. ]]
15th May '16 6:19:11 PM NightShade96
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'' (1926). Third Hercule Poirot novel. First appearances for narrator Dr. James Sheppard, and his spinster sister Caroline Sheppard. Caroline is considered to be the main inspiration and prototype for Literature/MissMarple.

to:

* ''TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'' ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'' (1926). Third Hercule Poirot novel. First appearances for narrator Dr. James Sheppard, and his spinster sister Caroline Sheppard. Caroline is considered to be the main inspiration and prototype for Literature/MissMarple. This novel made Christie famous due to its use of the [[spoiler:UnreliableNarrator]] device.



* ''Literature/MurderAtTheVicarage" (1930). First ''Literature/MissMarple'' novel, though the character had already appeared in short stories. Also features her nephew Raymond West, a successful author. First appearances for Reverend Leonard Clement and his wife Griselda Clement, who are major characters in the novel. They have small parts in later novels. First appearances for Dr. Haydock (police surgeon), Colonel Melchett (Chief Constable), and Detective Inspector Slack (police investigator). The latter is an InspectorLestrade-type.
* ''Black Coffee '' (1930). First theatrical play by Christie. Features Literature/HerculePoirot, Arthur Hastings, and Inspector Japp. The play received a film adaptation in 1931, and another in 1932. It was published in book form in 1934, and adapted into a novel by Charles Osborne in 1998.

to:

* ''Literature/MurderAtTheVicarage" ''Literature/TheMurderAtTheVicarage'' (1930). First The first ''Literature/MissMarple'' novel, though the character had already appeared in short stories. Also features her nephew Raymond West, a successful author. First appearances for Reverend Leonard Clement and his wife Griselda Clement, who are major characters in the novel. They this novel and have small parts in later novels. First appearances novels, and also for Dr. Haydock (police surgeon), Colonel Melchett (Chief Constable), and Detective Inspector Slack (police investigator). The latter is an InspectorLestrade-type.
* ''Black Coffee '' Coffee'' (1930). First theatrical play by Christie. Features Literature/HerculePoirot, Arthur Hastings, and Inspector Japp. The play received a film adaptation in 1931, and another in 1932. It was published in book form in 1934, and adapted into a novel by Charles Osborne in 1998.



** ''The Gypsy''/"The Gipsy''. Dickie Carpenter, a retired naval officer, has had recurring dreams featuring a Gypsy FortuneTeller for most of his life. Always warning him against one thing or another. Now he has met Mrs. Alistair Haworth, a woman who looks just like her. And she gives him a warning concerning his love life and even his health condition. A warning which he repeatedly attempts to ignore. But YouCantFightFate. Meanwhile, the lady with the "second sight" seems to have premonitions of her own death.

to:

** ''The Gypsy''/"The Gypsy''/''The Gipsy''. Dickie Carpenter, a retired naval officer, has had recurring dreams featuring a Gypsy FortuneTeller for most of his life. Always warning him against one thing or another. Now he has met Mrs. Alistair Haworth, a woman who looks just like her. And she gives him a warning concerning his love life and even his health condition. A warning which he repeatedly attempts to ignore. But YouCantFightFate. Meanwhile, the lady with the "second sight" seems to have premonitions of her own death.



* ''MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' (1934). Eighth Hercule Poirot novel. The entire murder investigation takes place on the Orient Express, which is SnowedIn. Nobody can leave.

to:

* ''MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'' (1934). Eighth Hercule Poirot novel. The entire murder investigation takes place on the Orient Express, which is SnowedIn. Nobody can leave.



* ''Literature/TheABCMurders'' (1936). Eleventh Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, and (briefly) Inspector Japp. Poirot apparently goes after a SerialKiller, but it turns out to be a case of SerialKillingsSpecificTarget. The novel being one of the most prominent examples of this trope. Poirot this time gets assisted by a group consisting of family members and associates of the victims: Megan Barnard, Franklin Clarke, Mary Drower, Donald Fraser, and Thora Grey. [[spoiler:Clarke turns out to be the DetectiveMole of the group. ]]

to:

* ''Literature/TheABCMurders'' (1936). Eleventh Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, and (briefly) Inspector Japp. Poirot apparently goes after a SerialKiller, but it turns out to be a case of SerialKillingsSpecificTarget. [[spoiler:SerialKillingsSpecificTarget]]. The novel being has one of the most prominent examples of this trope. Poirot this time gets is assisted by a group consisting of family members and associates of the victims: Megan Barnard, Franklin Clarke, Mary Drower, Donald Fraser, and Thora Grey. [[spoiler:Clarke turns out to be the DetectiveMole of the group. ]]



* ''Hercule Poirot's Christmas'' (1938). Seventeenth Hercule Poirot novel. A LockedRoomMystery. Simeon Lee, an aging millionaire, organizes a family reunion. Given his own tendency to play sadistic mind games, the tensions and bad blood between several family members, and that several of them have never actually met, this is not a happy occasion. On Christmas' Eve, Simeon has his throat slit within a certain room of his residence. A locked room. There is no shortage of suspects for Poirot. One of Christie's prominent uses of the BigScrewedUpFamily trope. The events of the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar provide a subplot, as one of the family members is from Spain and has survived the War. She only attends the reunion to escape her war-torn country.

to:

* ''Hercule Poirot's Christmas'' (1938). Seventeenth Hercule Poirot novel. A LockedRoomMystery. Simeon Lee, an aging millionaire, organizes a family reunion. Given his own tendency to play sadistic mind games, the tensions and bad blood between several family members, and the fact that several of them have never actually met, this is not a happy occasion. On Christmas' Eve, Simeon has his throat slit within a certain room of his residence. A residence (a locked room.room). There is no shortage of suspects for Poirot. One of Christie's prominent uses of the BigScrewedUpFamily trope. The events of the UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar provide a subplot, as one of the family members is from Spain and has survived the War. She only attends the reunion to escape her war-torn country.



** ''The Dream''. Features Hercule Poirot. First published in October, 1937. Poirot is summoned to the residence of Benedict Farley, a reclusive millionaire. They meet in a darkened room, with a lamp being the only source of light. Farley claims to be having a recurring dream of committing suicide by shooting himself. Always at the same time: 3.28 PM. Hercule asks to investigate the room where the dreams take place, but Farley refuses. Poirot turns down the case. A week later, Farley dies in the time "predicted" by the dream. Poirot is suddenly interested in the case, suspecting that his previous meeting with Farley was a set-up. [[spoiler:The person Poirot had met in that room was not Farley. The dreams and predictions was a way for the murderers to cover their tracks, by attributing the "suicide" of Farley to his growing obsession with them. The real Farley had no idea about any of this. ]]

to:

** ''The Dream''. Features Hercule Poirot. First published in October, 1937. Poirot is summoned to the residence of Benedict Farley, a reclusive millionaire. They meet in a darkened room, with a lamp being the only source of light. Farley claims to be having a recurring dream of committing suicide by shooting himself. Always at the same time: 3.28 PM. Hercule Poirot asks to investigate the room where the dreams take place, but Farley refuses. Poirot turns down the case. A week later, Farley dies in the time "predicted" by the dream. Poirot is suddenly interested in the case, suspecting that his previous meeting with Farley was a set-up. [[spoiler:The person Poirot had met in that room was not Farley. The dreams and predictions was were a way for the murderers to cover their tracks, by attributing the "suicide" of Farley to his growing obsession with them. The real Farley had no idea about any of this. ]]



** ''Problem at Sea''. First published in December, 1935. Features Hercule Poirot. Poirot travels by sea to Egypt. Aboard the ship, the Sleuth is able to observe his fellow passengers. Particularly a middle-aged couple:Colonel John Clapperton and his wife Lady Adeline (formerly Lady Carrington). John used to be a music-hall performer, prior to his service in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. He was wounded and transferred to a war hospital run by Lady Carrington. The two supposedly fell in love, and married. He owes his military rank and social position to her influence. Something which she never really lets him forget. Currently the Colonel is a HenpeckedHusband, while the Lady has become quite insufferable in her interactions with just about anybody. When the ship reaches the port of Alexandria, Poirot and other passengers overhear a conversation between the Colonel and his wife. She has locked herself in her room and refuses to exit. He leaves and tours Alexandria in the company of his fellow passengers. When they return, they discover the corpse of Lady Adeline. Stabbed to death within her locked room. Her husband is beyond suspicion since the Lady died following his departure from the ship. But Poirot suspects otherwise. [[spoiler:Clapperton had informed his fellow passengers of his music-hall career, but implied that his number involved card tricks. Poirot instead finds out that Clapperton was a [[{{Ventriloquism}} Ventriloquist]]. He killed his wife, then talked to her from outside the closed door of the room and projected her voice coming from the inside. Creating an alibi for himself. ]]
* ''AndThenThereWereNone'' (1939). First published as ''Ten Little Niggers''. A mystery novel. Ten people, with seemingly nothing in common among them, gather at Nigger Island, off the coast of Devon. Someone lured them there, citing different causes for the gathering to each person. They then start dying one by one, in ways reminiscent of the nursery rhyme of the original title. Christie often used IronicNurseryTune to provide titles or plot points for her stories. But this is by far her most successful use of the trope. Due to claims of racist implications in the original version, the novel has been revised in later editions. Replacing all references to Niggers with more AcceptableTargets.

to:

** ''Problem at Sea''. First published in December, 1935. Features Hercule Poirot. Poirot travels by sea to Egypt. Aboard the ship, the Sleuth is able to observe his fellow passengers. Particularly passengers, particularly a middle-aged couple:Colonel couple: Colonel John Clapperton and his wife Lady Adeline (formerly Lady Carrington). John used to be a music-hall performer, prior to his service in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. He was wounded and transferred to a war hospital run by Lady Carrington. The two supposedly fell in love, love and married. He owes his military rank and social position to her influence. Something influence, something which she never really lets him forget. Currently the Colonel is a HenpeckedHusband, while the Lady has become quite insufferable in her interactions with just about anybody. When the ship reaches the port of Alexandria, Poirot and other passengers overhear a conversation between the Colonel and his wife. She has locked herself in her room and refuses to exit. He leaves and tours Alexandria in the company of his fellow passengers. When they return, they discover the corpse of Lady Adeline. Stabbed Adeline, stabbed to death within her locked room. Her husband is beyond suspicion since the Lady died following his departure from the ship. But ship, but Poirot suspects otherwise. [[spoiler:Clapperton had informed his fellow passengers of his music-hall career, but implied that his number involved card tricks. Poirot instead finds out that Clapperton was a [[{{Ventriloquism}} Ventriloquist]]. He killed his wife, then talked to her from outside the closed door of the room and projected her voice coming from the inside. Creating inside, creating an alibi for himself. himself.]]
* ''AndThenThereWereNone'' ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' (1939). First published as ''Ten Little Niggers''. A mystery novel. Ten people, people with seemingly nothing in common among them, them gather at Nigger Island, Island (referred to as Soldier Island in newer reprints) off the coast of Devon. Someone lured them there, citing different causes for the gathering to each person. They then start dying one by one, in ways reminiscent of the nursery rhyme of the original title. Christie often used an IronicNurseryTune to provide titles or plot points for her stories. But stories, but this is by far her most successful use of the trope. Due to claims of racist implications in the original version, the novel has been revised in later editions. Replacing editions, replacing all references to Niggers niggers with more AcceptableTargets.



* ''Literature/SadCypress'' (1940). Eighteenth Hercule Poirot novel. This one has elements of a LawProcedural. In the first part of the novel, readers are introduced to the family which serves as the focus of the case. Mrs. Laura Welman, a childless widow, and her three potential heirs: niece Elinor Carlisle, nephew Roddy Welman, and surrogate daughter Mary Gerrard. [[spoiler:Mary is actually an illegitimate daughter of Laura. ]] Elinor and Roddy are distant cousins, and are romantically involved with each other. Until now they were considered the most likely heirs to the family fortune, but now Mary has become the favorite. Roddy is also starting to fall for Mary. When first Laura and then Mary die suddenly, Elinor alone inherits the family estate. But examination of the two bodies reveals that the cause of death was morphine poisoning. Elinore is arrested for murder. The rest of the book covers the trial of Elinor, with Poirot hired to find evidence exonerating her. The only way to settle the matter is discovering the identity and motive of the real killer. While the novel is generally regarded as a strong entry in the series, Christie herself disagreed. Feeling that "Sad Cypress could have been good, but it was quite ruined by having Poirot in it."
* ''One, Two, Buckle My Shoe'' (1940). Nineteenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp, making his last appearance in a novel. Henry Morley, Poirot's dentist, has been murdered. Shot to death within his own office. Fellow customer Amberiotis, a Greek blackmailer, is also dead. Killed by an overdose of anesthetic. Another client, Mabelle Sainsbury Seale, vanishes. But the body of a woman matching her age soon turns up, with the face disfigured beyond recognition. The life of a fourth customer, politically-influential banker Alistair Blunt, might be in danger. Poirot has to discover what connects the murders to each other. The novel is set in the political climate of the late 1930s, with subplots covering the British Union of Fascists gaining a following among the new generation, communism also spreading out, and political tensions increasing. Blunt himself is a conservative figure, and the main figure maintaining the stability of the current British political system. The murders have an ideological motivation and the killer firmly believes that the ends justify the means. Poirot has to make his own decision on the matter, struggling with a MoralDilemma by the finale. The novel is considered particularly gloomy and humorless, arguably reflecting its setting in time.
* ''Evil Under the Sun'' (1941). Twentieth Hercule Poirot novel. Arthur Hastings has a cameo, discussing the case with Poirot following its conclusion. A reworking of the novella ''Triangle at Rhodes''. Poirot is vacationing in Devon, alongside several other turists. The most prominent among them is retired actress Arlena Stuart. Accompanied by her current husband Captain Kenneth Marshall and her teenaged stepdaughter Linda Marshall. The vain Arlena is openly flirting with her new love interest Patrick Redfern. Despite the presence of his mousy wife Christine Redfern. When Arlena is found murdered, strangulated, Poirot has to go through a long list of suspects. Many had clear motives to kill her, and even more had the opportunity to do so.

to:

* ''Literature/SadCypress'' (1940). Eighteenth Hercule Poirot novel. This one has elements of a LawProcedural. In the first part of the novel, readers are introduced to the family which serves as the focus of the case. Mrs. Laura Welman, a childless widow, and her three potential heirs: niece Elinor Carlisle, nephew Roddy Welman, and surrogate daughter Mary Gerrard. [[spoiler:Mary is actually an illegitimate daughter of Laura. ]] Elinor and Roddy are distant cousins, and are romantically involved with each other. Until now they were considered the most likely heirs to the family fortune, but now Mary has become the favorite. Roddy is also starting to fall for Mary. When first Laura and then Mary die suddenly, Elinor alone inherits the family estate. But estate, but examination of the two bodies reveals that the cause of death was morphine poisoning. Elinore is arrested for murder. The rest of the book covers the trial of Elinor, with Poirot hired to find evidence exonerating her. The only way to settle the matter is discovering the identity and motive of the real killer. While the novel is generally regarded as a strong entry in the series, Christie herself disagreed. Feeling disagreed, feeling that "Sad Cypress could have been good, but it was quite ruined by having Poirot in it."
* ''One, Two, Buckle My Shoe'' (1940). Nineteenth Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Inspector Japp, making his last appearance in a novel. Henry Morley, Poirot's dentist, has been murdered. Shot murdered, having been shot to death within his own office. Fellow customer Amberiotis, a Greek blackmailer, is also dead. Killed dead, killed by an overdose of anesthetic. Another client, Mabelle Sainsbury Seale, vanishes. But vanishes, but the body of a woman matching her age soon turns up, with the face disfigured beyond recognition. The life of a fourth customer, politically-influential banker Alistair Blunt, might be in danger. Poirot has to discover what connects the murders to each other. The novel is set in the political climate of the late 1930s, with subplots covering the British Union of Fascists gaining a following among the new generation, communism also spreading out, and political tensions increasing. Blunt himself is a conservative figure, and the main figure maintaining the stability of the current British political system. The murders have an ideological motivation and the killer firmly believes that the ends justify the means. Poirot has to make his own decision on the matter, struggling with a MoralDilemma by the finale. The novel is considered particularly gloomy and humorless, arguably reflecting its setting in time.
* ''Evil Under the Sun'' ''Literature/EvilUnderTheSun'' (1941). Twentieth Hercule Poirot novel. Arthur Hastings has a cameo, discussing the case with Poirot following its conclusion. A reworking of the novella ''Triangle at Rhodes''. Poirot is vacationing in Devon, alongside several other turists. tourists. The most prominent among them is retired actress Arlena Stuart. Accompanied Stuart, who is accompanied by her current husband Captain Kenneth Marshall and her teenaged stepdaughter Linda Marshall. The vain Arlena is openly flirting with her new love interest Patrick Redfern. Despite Redfern, despite the presence of his mousy wife Christine Redfern. When Arlena is found murdered, strangulated, strangled, Poirot has to go through a long list of suspects. Many had clear motives to kill her, and even more had the opportunity to do so.



* ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' (1942). Twenty-first Hercule Poirot novel. Famous painter Amyas Crale was murdered, poisoned, about two decades prior to the beginning of the novel. Caroline Crale, his wife, was the main suspect for the murder. She was arrested, put on trial, and convicted. She died for her supposed crime. The couple were survived by an infant daughter. Said daughter Carla (Caroline) Lemarchant is now an adult and hires Poirot to clear the name of her mother. With all physical evidence long gone, Poirot has to find out the truth through interviewing five people who were closely connected to the couple at the time of the murder: 1) Angela Warren, younger half-sister of Caroline. Raised by her sister. She grew up to become an AdventurerArchaeologist, 2) Cecilia Williams. The devoted governess to the Crale children. Currently long retired, 3) Elsa Greer. The last mistress of Amyas Crale. She went to became Lady Dittisham, a wealthy aristcrat by marriage, 4) Phillip Blake. A stockbroker and family friend of the Crales, 5) Meredith, a reclusive amateur herbalist. Brother to Phillip and another family friend. The story is told in RashomonStyle, with each person's emotions towards Amyas and Caroline clearly coloring their perception of events. The novel is considered among the best works of Christie in terms of characterization.

to:

* ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' (1942). Twenty-first Hercule Poirot novel. Famous painter Amyas Crale was murdered, poisoned, murdered by poisoning about two decades prior to the beginning of the novel. Caroline Crale, his wife, was the main suspect for the murder. She was arrested, put on trial, and convicted. She died for her supposed crime. The couple were survived by an infant daughter. Said daughter Carla (Caroline) Lemarchant is now an adult and hires Poirot to clear the name of her mother. With all physical evidence long gone, Poirot has to find out the truth through interviewing five people who were closely connected to the couple at the time of the murder: 1) Angela Warren, younger half-sister of Caroline. Raised She was raised by her sister. She sister and grew up to become an AdventurerArchaeologist, 2) Cecilia Williams. The Williams, the devoted governess to the Crale children. Currently long retired, 3) Elsa Greer. The last mistress of Amyas Crale. She went to became Lady Dittisham, a wealthy aristcrat by marriage, 4) Phillip Blake. A stockbroker and family friend of the Crales, 5) Meredith, a reclusive amateur herbalist. herbalist, Brother to Phillip Philip and another family friend. The story is told in RashomonStyle, with each person's emotions towards Amyas and Caroline clearly coloring their perception of events. The novel is considered among the best works of Christie in terms of characterization.
10th Apr '16 7:49:30 PM DoctorCooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TheABCMurders'' (1936). Eleventh Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, and (briefly) Inspector Japp. Poirot apparently goes after a SerialKiller, but it turns out to be a case of SerialKillingsSpecificTarget. The novel being one of the most prominent examples of this trope. Poirot this time gets assisted by a group consisting of family members and associates of the victims: Megan Barnard, Franklin Clarke, Mary Drower, Donald Fraser, and Thora Grey. [[spoiler:Clarke turns out to be the DetectiveMole of the group. ]]

to:

* ''TheABCMurders'' ''Literature/TheABCMurders'' (1936). Eleventh Hercule Poirot novel. Also features Arthur Hastings, and (briefly) Inspector Japp. Poirot apparently goes after a SerialKiller, but it turns out to be a case of SerialKillingsSpecificTarget. The novel being one of the most prominent examples of this trope. Poirot this time gets assisted by a group consisting of family members and associates of the victims: Megan Barnard, Franklin Clarke, Mary Drower, Donald Fraser, and Thora Grey. [[spoiler:Clarke turns out to be the DetectiveMole of the group. ]]
12th Mar '16 1:45:53 AM GrammarNavi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Swan Song''. First published in September, 1926. A {{Revenge}} story with elements deriving from a famous {{Opera}}. There is no singular protagonist. The main characters are Madame Paula Nazorkoff, Edouard Bréon, and Blanche Amery. Paula is a "famous operatic star", reputedly of Russian origin. When her agent arranged for a small number of London appearances for her, Paula insists that a performance of {{Tosca}} is included. Edouard is a "famous French baritone", currently retired. He is offered the role of Scarpia, to serve as his swan song. He accepts, and is glad to compare the voice of Paula to that of Bianca Capelli, a talented Italian singer whose career ended early. Bianca's lover was a member of the [[TheMafia camorra]], who was arrested and executed. Bianca retired to a convent shortly thereafter. Blanche is a 24-year-old English woman, daughter of a Lady. Who soon notices some peculiarities in both singers and in the story she heard. During the performance, the famous scene where Tosca stabs Scarpia to death gets a rather realistic re-enactment. Paula stabs Edouard to death. People wonder why, and whether it was an accident. But Blanche realizes the truth. [[spoiler:Paula Nazorkoff and Bianca Capelli are the same person. Eduard was partially responsible for the death of her lover, and Paula/Bianca knew it. Paula had insisted on a performance of Tosca, specifically to get her revenge. ]]

to:

** ''Swan Song''. First published in September, 1926. A {{Revenge}} story with elements deriving from a famous {{Opera}}. There is no singular protagonist. The main characters are Madame Paula Nazorkoff, Edouard Bréon, and Blanche Amery. Paula is a "famous operatic star", reputedly of Russian origin. When her agent arranged for a small number of London appearances for her, Paula insists that a performance of {{Tosca}} ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' is included. Edouard is a "famous French baritone", currently retired. He is offered the role of Scarpia, to serve as his swan song. He accepts, and is glad to compare the voice of Paula to that of Bianca Capelli, a talented Italian singer whose career ended early. Bianca's lover was a member of the [[TheMafia camorra]], who was arrested and executed. Bianca retired to a convent shortly thereafter. Blanche is a 24-year-old English woman, daughter of a Lady. Who soon notices some peculiarities in both singers and in the story she heard. During the performance, the famous scene where Tosca stabs Scarpia to death gets a rather realistic re-enactment. Paula stabs Edouard to death. People wonder why, and whether it was an accident. But Blanche realizes the truth. [[spoiler:Paula Nazorkoff and Bianca Capelli are the same person. Eduard was partially responsible for the death of her lover, and Paula/Bianca knew it. Paula had insisted on a performance of Tosca, ''Tosca'', specifically to get her revenge. ]]
7th Mar '16 9:40:30 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''The Affair of the Pink Pearl''. First published in October, 1924. Parodies the "Dr. Thorndyke" series by Richard Austin Freeman.

to:

** ''The Affair of the Pink Pearl''. First published in October, 1924. Parodies the "Dr. Thorndyke" "Literature/DrThorndyke" series by Richard Austin Freeman.
3rd Mar '16 3:51:26 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''The Double Clue''. Features Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings. First published in December, 1923. Introduces Countess Vera Rossakoff, Poirot's only known love interest. Poirot is hired by Marcus Hardman, a collector of precious antiques, to retrieve jewels stolen from his residence. His main suspects are four recent guests to said residence: 1) Mr. Johnston, a South African businessman, 2) Bernard Parker, an effeminate employee to Hardman, 3) Countess Vera Rossakoff, a Russian aristocratic refugee who survived the UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and 4) Lady Runcorn, a middle-aged society lady who happens to be niece to a kleptomaniac. The only clues are a man's glove and a cigarette case left behind by the thief. Bearing the initials "BP". Poirot solves the case based on his knowledge of the CyrillicAlphabet. [[spoiler:The letter "B" of the Cyrillic alphabet is equivalent to the Latin "V", not the Latin "B". The letter "P" of the Cyrillic alphabet is equivalent to the Latin "R", not the Latin "P". The initials stand for Vera Rosakoff.]] The conclusion to the story may seem obvious to readers familiar with Vera through her later appearances.

to:

** ''The Double Clue''. Features Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings. First published in December, 1923. Introduces Countess Vera Rossakoff, Poirot's only known love interest. Poirot is hired by Marcus Hardman, a collector of precious antiques, to retrieve jewels stolen from his residence. His main suspects are four recent guests to said residence: 1) Mr. Johnston, a South African businessman, 2) Bernard Parker, an effeminate employee to Hardman, 3) Countess Vera Rossakoff, a Russian aristocratic refugee who survived the UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and 4) Lady Runcorn, a middle-aged society lady who happens to be niece to a kleptomaniac. The only clues are a man's glove and a cigarette case left behind by the thief. Bearing the initials "BP". Poirot solves the case based on his knowledge of the CyrillicAlphabet.UsefulNotes/CyrillicAlphabet. [[spoiler:The letter "B" of the Cyrillic alphabet is equivalent to the Latin "V", not the Latin "B". The letter "P" of the Cyrillic alphabet is equivalent to the Latin "R", not the Latin "P". The initials stand for Vera Rosakoff.]] The conclusion to the story may seem obvious to readers familiar with Vera through her later appearances.
This list shows the last 10 events of 61. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Bibliography.AgathaChristie