History BeamMeUpScotty / ReligiousScripture

28th Feb '18 5:18:19 AM Sparrowhawk
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** In a similar vein, modern Christians often incorrectly refer to "Psalms chapter 21" when it should be "the 21st Psalm", as that particular book is not a series of chapters but a collection of songs.
28th Feb '18 5:14:22 AM Sparrowhawk
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* None of St Paul's letters says, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do"; the quote is from St Ambrose: ''si fueris Romae, Romano vivito more; si fueris alibi, vivito sicut ibi'' ("if you are in Rome, live in the Roman way; if you are elsewhere, live as they do there." On the other hand, St Paul does, in a similar spirit, claim to have made himself "all things to all men" (1 Corinthians 9:19-23): a Jew to the Jews, and a non-Jew to the non-Jews, and so on.

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* None of St Paul's letters says, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do"; the quote is from St Ambrose: ''si fueris Romae, Romano vivito more; si fueris alibi, vivito sicut ibi'' ("if you are in Rome, live in the Roman way; if you are elsewhere, live as they do there." "
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On the other hand, St Paul does, in a similar spirit, claim to have made himself "all things to all men" (1 Corinthians 9:19-23): a Jew to the Jews, and a non-Jew to the non-Jews, and so on.
28th Feb '18 5:14:02 AM Sparrowhawk
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* None of St Paul's letters says, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do"; the quote is from St Ambrose: ''si fueris Romae, Romano vivito more; si fueris alibi, vivito sicut ibi'' ("if you are in Rome, live in the Roman way; if you are elsewhere, live as they do there."

to:

* None of St Paul's letters says, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do"; the quote is from St Ambrose: ''si fueris Romae, Romano vivito more; si fueris alibi, vivito sicut ibi'' ("if you are in Rome, live in the Roman way; if you are elsewhere, live as they do there."" On the other hand, St Paul does, in a similar spirit, claim to have made himself "all things to all men" (1 Corinthians 9:19-23): a Jew to the Jews, and a non-Jew to the non-Jews, and so on.
4th Feb '18 9:45:51 AM bydlo
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* Nowhere in Literature/TheQuran does it state that martyrs will get 72 virgins. The concept actually comes from a ''Hadith'' (a story concerning the life of Muhammad), this particular hadith is not considered credible by almost all Muslims. Furthermore, the Hadith does not mention that martyrs get 72 virgins, it says that ''everyone'' in paradise will be served by 72 houri (angelic servants).

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* Nowhere in Literature/TheQuran does it state that martyrs will get 72 virgins. The concept actually comes from a ''Hadith'' (a story concerning the life of Muhammad), this particular hadith is not considered credible by almost all Muslims. Furthermore, the Hadith does not mention that martyrs get 72 virgins, it says that ''everyone'' in paradise will be served by 72 houri (angelic servants).Muhammad).
4th Feb '18 9:43:18 AM bydlo
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*** Suffice it to say that a lot of the maltreatment women get at the hands of "Islam" is local custom that has been justified by [[TwistingTheWords taking bits of the Qur'an and flimsy pieces of Hadith]] (the words of UsefulNotes/TheProphetMuhammad, which are extremely persuasive but not absolute authority on Islamic law; moreover, both traditional and modern scholarship have cast doubt on the authenticity of some reported statements)[[note]]For instance, a few feminist Muslim writers have investigated the Hadiths reported by Abu Huraira regarding women, accusing him of being less reliable than traditional Sunni sources claim, a self-promoter, and a misogynist to boot ("Abu Huraira"--[[OnlyKnownByTheirNickname really a nickname]]--means "the guy with the kitten," as he had a cat as a kid, which for some reason he found embarrassingly effeminate--hence the misogyny). The Shia for their part have never trusted him either, as not only is he not part of the Prophet's family (the Shia traditionally regard Hadith not related by the Prophet's House to be suspect at best), he was staunchly opposed to the Shia cause from the beginning.[[/note]] over the centuries.
** In Afghanistan, it is widely believed that that the Quran definitely says somewhere that men can treat women as horribly as they like. It doesn't help that most of the country's population is illiterate and thus can't actually read the Quran. Conservative mullahs have been known to attribute Pashtun proverbs like "[[StayInTheKitchen a woman’s place is in the home or in the grave]]" to the Quran, in which they don't appear.
14th Dec '17 12:10:45 PM GothicProphet
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* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive these writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play too--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)

to:

* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive these writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play too--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.))
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5th Dec '17 8:34:56 AM ZSF
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* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive these writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)

to:

* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive these writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we too--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)
5th Dec '17 7:44:28 AM ZSF
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* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive the biblical writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)

to:

* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive the biblical these writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)
5th Dec '17 7:38:31 AM ZSF
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* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus “fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'” Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive the biblical writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)

to:

* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus “fulfilled "fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'” '" Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive the biblical writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)
5th Dec '17 7:34:34 AM ZSF
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\n----* The Bible actually does this to ''itself'' in a few places, generally when a New Testament writer is quoting scripture from the Old Testament. For instance, Matthew 27:9 asserts that Judas' betrayal of Jesus “fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; and gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me.'” Actually, though, the scripture in question is found in Zechariah, not Jeremiah. There are also some instances of two verses being conflated, as in Mark 1:1-3, which provides a quote attributed to Isaiah that is really a combination of verses from Isaiah and Malachi. (Some translations correct the error by saying "the prophets" rather than "Isaiah.") These mistakes can typically be explained by the fact that the biblical writers were living in a period when holy texts took the form of large scrolls in temples, and were not readily accessible to most ordinary people. Considering they were almost certainly working from memory, it's impressive the biblical writers were as accurate as they were! (And, of course, translation and transcription errors may very well be at play as well--we don't have the original copy of any biblical text.)
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