History BadassBoast / RealLife

21st Oct '17 3:02:19 PM nombretomado
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* In the fall of 1966 [[UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn Deutsche Bundesbahn]] of WestGermany started one of the most influential and enduring [[https://www.google.de/search?q=alle+reden+vom+wetter+wir+nicht&client=ubuntu&hs=cOl&channel=fs&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi4nLXF96DMAhUCKcAKHXqbC1cQsAQIIQ&biw=1301&bih=673 ad campaigns]] in the history of German language ads. So enduring in fact, Wiki/ThatOtherWiki has [[http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alle_reden_vom_Wetter._Wir_nicht an article]] on it "Alle reden vom Wetter (line break) Wir nicht." [[note]]Everybody talks about the weather - we don't[[/note]]. Six words, a CoolTrain and a railway had written a check it is still accused five decades later of not making good on whenever [[NeverLiveItDown something weather related throws a wrench into the smooth operation of trains]]. The slogan itself has become so iconic that there is a reasonable chance most Germans will know it (if not necessarily its origin) and variations have made its way into popular culture, e.g. the same slogan only with images of Marx, Engels and Lenin or a similar slogan "Alle reden von Deutschland, wir reden vom Wetter" [[note]]Everybody is talking about Germany (referring to the then current reunification), we are talking about the weather (referring to global warming, the Ozone hole and similar problems)[[/note]] by the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticiansAndPartiesOfGermany Greens]] in their (ultimately disastrous) 1990 election campaign. It is fair to say the slogan has become a meme in its own right in Germany.

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* In the fall of 1966 [[UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn Deutsche Bundesbahn]] of WestGermany UsefulNotes/WestGermany started one of the most influential and enduring [[https://www.google.de/search?q=alle+reden+vom+wetter+wir+nicht&client=ubuntu&hs=cOl&channel=fs&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi4nLXF96DMAhUCKcAKHXqbC1cQsAQIIQ&biw=1301&bih=673 ad campaigns]] in the history of German language ads. So enduring in fact, Wiki/ThatOtherWiki has [[http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alle_reden_vom_Wetter._Wir_nicht an article]] on it "Alle reden vom Wetter (line break) Wir nicht." [[note]]Everybody talks about the weather - we don't[[/note]]. Six words, a CoolTrain and a railway had written a check it is still accused five decades later of not making good on whenever [[NeverLiveItDown something weather related throws a wrench into the smooth operation of trains]]. The slogan itself has become so iconic that there is a reasonable chance most Germans will know it (if not necessarily its origin) and variations have made its way into popular culture, e.g. the same slogan only with images of Marx, Engels and Lenin or a similar slogan "Alle reden von Deutschland, wir reden vom Wetter" [[note]]Everybody is talking about Germany (referring to the then current reunification), we are talking about the weather (referring to global warming, the Ozone hole and similar problems)[[/note]] by the [[UsefulNotes/PoliticiansAndPartiesOfGermany Greens]] in their (ultimately disastrous) 1990 election campaign. It is fair to say the slogan has become a meme in its own right in Germany.
15th Oct '17 9:40:51 AM moloch
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[[http://www.thedropzone.org/europe/bulge/kinnard.html Here's the story]]: the German Commander sent him a long letter detailing his position in a haughty manner and demanding surrender. The letter was "To the American Commander," and signed, "The German Commander." [=McAuliffe=] read it and blurted out "Nuts!" When he and his men tried to compose a reply, they came to the conclusion nothing was better than that, so the full text of the reply was, "To the German Commander: Nuts! The American Commander."

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** [[http://www.thedropzone.org/europe/bulge/kinnard.html Here's the story]]: the German Commander sent him a long letter detailing his position in a haughty manner and demanding surrender. The letter was "To the American Commander," and signed, "The German Commander." [=McAuliffe=] read it and blurted out "Nuts!" When he and his men tried to compose a reply, they came to the conclusion nothing was better than that, so the full text of the reply was, "To the German Commander: Nuts! The American Commander."
15th Oct '17 9:40:09 AM moloch
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15th Oct '17 9:39:00 AM moloch
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* General [=McAuliffe=], at the Battle of the Bulge, was presented with a surrender ultimatum by the Germans. To which he said: "NUTS!"
** That reaction came after [=McAuliffe=] initially believed the Germans were wanting to surrender ''to'' him.

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* General [=McAuliffe=], at the Battle of the Bulge, was presented with a surrender ultimatum by the Germans. To which Germans.
[[http://www.thedropzone.org/europe/bulge/kinnard.html Here's the story]]: the German Commander sent him a long letter detailing his position in a haughty manner and demanding surrender. The letter was "To the American Commander," and signed, "The German Commander." [=McAuliffe=] read it and blurted out "Nuts!" When
he said: "NUTS!"
and his men tried to compose a reply, they came to the conclusion nothing was better than that, so the full text of the reply was, "To the German Commander: Nuts! The American Commander."
*** The German officers who were sent with the surrender request weren't familar with the American slang and asked if it was an affirmative or a negative. The American officers' response? "The reply is decidedly not affirmative", then added, "If you continue this foolish attack, your losses will be tremendous."
*** Then they asked what "Nuts" meant. One of the more hot-tempered officers suggested "Go take a flying S---!". The translator considered this for a moment, then decided on the more tactful "You can go to Hell."
** That Oh, we forgot to mention that reaction came after [=McAuliffe=] initially believed the Germans were wanting to surrender ''to'' him.him!



** [[http://www.thedropzone.org/europe/bulge/kinnard.html Here's the story]]: the German Commander sent him a long letter detailing his position in a haughty manner and demanding surrender. The letter was "To the American Commander," and signed, "The German Commander." [=McAuliffe=] read it and blurted out "Nuts!" When he and his men tried to compose a reply, they came to the conclusion nothing was better than that, so the full text of the reply was, "To the German Commander: Nuts! The American Commander."
*** The German officers who were sent with the surrender request weren't familar with the American slang and asked if it was an afirmative or negative. The american officers response? "The reply is decidedly not affirmative", then added, "If you continue this foolish attack, your losses will be tremendous."
*** Then they asked what "Nuts" meant. One of the more hot-tempered officers suggested "Go take a flying S---!". The translator considered this for a moment, then decided on the more tactful "You can go to Hell."
7th Oct '17 8:25:40 AM HwaetGrimmalkin
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** The Spartans have a long history of this sort of thing. When Philip II of Macedon sent a message to Sparta saying "If I enter Laconia, I will level Sparta to the ground," The Spartans' response was one word: "If." Later, Philip II sent another message to Sparta, asking if they would rather have him come as friend or foe; the Spartan resply was, "Neither." Neither Philip II, nor his son, Alexander the Great, attempted an invasion of the Spartan territory.

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** The Spartans have a long history of this sort of thing. When Philip II of Macedon sent a message to Sparta saying "If I enter Laconia, I will level Sparta to the ground," The Spartans' response was one word: "If." Later, Philip II sent another message to Sparta, asking if they would rather have him come as friend or foe; the Spartan resply reply was, "Neither." Neither Philip II, nor his son, Alexander the Great, attempted an invasion of the Spartan territory.
5th Oct '17 7:56:38 PM PaleHorse
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Added DiffLines:

** On the contrary, Jesus has a pretty good one in the Gospel of Matthew when He is betrayed by Judas and handed over to an armed mob. One of the disciples draws his sword, and Jesus asks him "Do you think that I cannot appeal to my Father, and He will at once send me more than twelve legions of angels?". Jesus has the authority to summon divine warriors to battle on His behalf, and yet He lays down that power to die by choice. Badass, indeed.
13th Jul '17 7:39:23 AM Eilevgmyhren
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Added DiffLines:

* Norwegian mountain farmers had a knack of those, when confronting officials. One legendary example is the story of ''Ola Uppsata'', who allegedly payed his way out of a murder in 1687 (while still a teenager). He was known for his bragging behaviour, showing off all his siver (on the hat, on his vest and on his shoes), making said officials claim that he should bargain himself out of the mess with all his silver (thus humiliating him). Ola payed up the weregild and asked for the price of a punch out. When he got that answer, he payed up again and requested if he could punch out whoever he wanted to, and the official confirmed it. Ola (or Blank-Ola as they called him), responded by knocking out said official, and proceeded to make a high leap in the air in front of the jury, with this legendary boast:
---> Blank-Ola is ''still dancing'' with his silver on his vest and shoes!
10th Jul '17 7:12:14 PM TimberRidge
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Added DiffLines:

** As Secretary of Defense, he has managed to match (at least) these statements. Asked in an interview, "What keeps you awake at night?":
--> "Nothing. I keep other people awake at night."
10th Jul '17 7:10:40 AM HwaetGrimmalkin
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** [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]] himself had this one when France has to face invasion in 1814: "The cannonball that will kill me has not been molded yet!".
*** And in 1798, at the start the Battle of the Pyramids during France's invasion of Egypt

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** [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]] himself had this one when France has had to face invasion in 1814: "The cannonball that will kill me has not been molded yet!".
*** And Perviously, in 1798, at the start the Battle of the Pyramids during France's invasion of EgyptEgypt:



* One very obvious joke apparently did the rounds of the IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles after the [[CurbStompBattle Six-Day War]]:

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* One very obvious joke (but no less badass) apparently did the rounds of the IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles after the [[CurbStompBattle Six-Day War]]:
10th Jul '17 7:06:37 AM HwaetGrimmalkin
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** The Spartans have a long history of this sort of thing. When Philip II of Macedon sent a message to Sparta saying "If I enter Laconia, I will level Sparta to the ground," The Spartans' response was one word: "If." Later, Philip II sent another message to Sparta, asking if they would rather have him come as friend or foe; the Spartan response was equally pithy and true to character: "Neither." Neither Philip II, nor his son, Alexander the Great, attempted an invasion of the Spartan territory.

to:

** The Spartans have a long history of this sort of thing. When Philip II of Macedon sent a message to Sparta saying "If I enter Laconia, I will level Sparta to the ground," The Spartans' response was one word: "If." Later, Philip II sent another message to Sparta, asking if they would rather have him come as friend or foe; the Spartan response was equally pithy and true to character: resply was, "Neither." Neither Philip II, nor his son, Alexander the Great, attempted an invasion of the Spartan territory.
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