History BLAM / Music

15th Apr '17 6:22:25 PM nombretomado
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* SoundHorizon has a particularly egregious one in ''The Princess Sleeping In The Glass Coffin'', in which Idolfried Ehrenberg, who never appears again, has a conversation which has nothing to do with the plot.

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* SoundHorizon Music/SoundHorizon has a particularly egregious one in ''The Princess Sleeping In The Glass Coffin'', in which Idolfried Ehrenberg, who never appears again, has a conversation which has nothing to do with the plot.
16th Feb '17 9:35:30 PM SparksOfTheTempest
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* {{Music/Edguy}} is quite fond of this.
** At the end of the title track of ''Theater of Salvation'', the final track of the album, there's about two minutes of silence before an oddly upbeat song begins playing and Tobias Sammet begins screaming in gibberish.
** The track "Lucifer In Love" from ''Hellfire Club''. A little over thirty seconds of demonic sexual groaning (which, it turns out, is Tobias Sammet's voice distorted) set to beautiful piano music...before immediately cutting to the next track.
** The "progressive version" of "Space Police" from some versions of the album of the same name. At first it's exactly the same as the regular version, until the second verse begins and Tobi begins to sing in a bizarre over the top falsetto. Afterwards, the song resumes as normal without any further deviations.



* Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.
* {{Music/Edguy}} is quite fond of this.
** At the end of the title track of ''Theater of Salvation'', the final track of the album, there's about two minutes of silence before an oddly upbeat song begins playing and Tobias Sammet begins screaming in gibberish.
** The track "Lucifer In Love" from ''Hellfire Club''. A little over thirty seconds of demonic sexual groaning (which, it turns out, is Tobias Sammet's voice distorted) set to beautiful piano music...before immediately cutting to the next track.
** The "progressive version" of "Space Police" from some versions of the album of the same name. At first it's exactly the same as the regular version, until the second verse begins and Tobi begins to sing in a bizarre over the top falsetto. Afterwards, the song resumes as normal without any further deviations.

to:

* Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.
* {{Music/Edguy}} is quite fond of this.
** At the end of the title track of ''Theater of Salvation'', the final track of the album, there's about two minutes of silence before an oddly upbeat song begins playing and Tobias Sammet begins screaming in gibberish.
** The track "Lucifer In Love" from ''Hellfire Club''. A little over thirty seconds of demonic sexual groaning (which, it turns out, is Tobias Sammet's voice distorted) set to beautiful piano music...before immediately cutting to the next track.
** The "progressive version" of "Space Police" from some versions of the album of the same name. At first it's exactly the same as the regular version, until the second verse begins and Tobi begins to sing in a bizarre over the top falsetto. Afterwards, the song resumes as normal without any further deviations.
laughter.
16th Feb '17 9:34:15 PM SparksOfTheTempest
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* Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.

to:

* Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.laughter.
* {{Music/Edguy}} is quite fond of this.
** At the end of the title track of ''Theater of Salvation'', the final track of the album, there's about two minutes of silence before an oddly upbeat song begins playing and Tobias Sammet begins screaming in gibberish.
** The track "Lucifer In Love" from ''Hellfire Club''. A little over thirty seconds of demonic sexual groaning (which, it turns out, is Tobias Sammet's voice distorted) set to beautiful piano music...before immediately cutting to the next track.
** The "progressive version" of "Space Police" from some versions of the album of the same name. At first it's exactly the same as the regular version, until the second verse begins and Tobi begins to sing in a bizarre over the top falsetto. Afterwards, the song resumes as normal without any further deviations.
14th Jan '17 2:36:01 PM Scsigs
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* The band Music/5SecondsofSummer have a propensity for, whether their fanbase wants to admit it or not, ripping off the instrumentals of songs from other bands from years prior. One of the most jarring examples, though, ''has'' to be from their song "18," where at 1:54, they go from the Pop Rock/Power Pop feel they had going for the song to the instrumentation from Music/FooFighters' "Everlong." Seriously, it lasts almost 30 seconds and it never pops up again because the song goes back to how it was before, then ends 40 seconds later. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T6o0iMfTbY Have a listen for yourself.]]

to:

* The band Music/5SecondsofSummer [[Music/FiveSecondsOfSummer 5 Seconds of Summer]] have a propensity for, whether their fanbase wants to admit it or not, ripping off the instrumentals of songs from other bands from years prior. One of the most jarring examples, though, ''has'' to be from their song "18," where at 1:54, they go from the Pop Rock/Power Pop feel they had going for the song to the instrumentation from Music/FooFighters' "Everlong." Seriously, it lasts almost 30 seconds and it never pops up again because the song goes back to how it was before, then ends 40 seconds later. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T6o0iMfTbY Have a listen for yourself.]]
14th Jan '17 2:34:39 PM Scsigs
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* The band Music/5SecondsOfSummer have a propensity for, whether their fanbase wants to admit it or not, ripping off the instrumentals of songs from other bands from years prior. One of the most jarring examples, though, ''has'' to be from their song "18," where at 1:54, they go from the Pop Rock/Power Pop feel they had going for the song to the instrumentation from Music/FooFighters' "Everlong." Seriously, it lasts almost 30 seconds and it never pops up again because the song goes back to how it was before, then ends 40 seconds later. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T6o0iMfTbY Have a listen for yourself.]]

to:

* The band Music/5SecondsOfSummer Music/5SecondsofSummer have a propensity for, whether their fanbase wants to admit it or not, ripping off the instrumentals of songs from other bands from years prior. One of the most jarring examples, though, ''has'' to be from their song "18," where at 1:54, they go from the Pop Rock/Power Pop feel they had going for the song to the instrumentation from Music/FooFighters' "Everlong." Seriously, it lasts almost 30 seconds and it never pops up again because the song goes back to how it was before, then ends 40 seconds later. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T6o0iMfTbY Have a listen for yourself.]]
14th Jan '17 2:33:36 PM Scsigs
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Added DiffLines:

* The band Music/5SecondsOfSummer have a propensity for, whether their fanbase wants to admit it or not, ripping off the instrumentals of songs from other bands from years prior. One of the most jarring examples, though, ''has'' to be from their song "18," where at 1:54, they go from the Pop Rock/Power Pop feel they had going for the song to the instrumentation from Music/FooFighters' "Everlong." Seriously, it lasts almost 30 seconds and it never pops up again because the song goes back to how it was before, then ends 40 seconds later. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T6o0iMfTbY Have a listen for yourself.]]
12th Jan '17 10:34:36 AM Morgenthaler
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* Halfway through the album ''Colors'' by BetweenTheBuriedAndMe comes the track "Ants of the Sky", an EpicRocking 13-minute track which twists, turns, and eventually builds up to... an utterly inexplicable bluegrass section. The very next track of the album features an ''accordion breakdown'', complete with vocalist Tommy Rogers growling in a French accent.

to:

* Halfway through the album ''Colors'' by BetweenTheBuriedAndMe Music/BetweenTheBuriedAndMe comes the track "Ants of the Sky", an EpicRocking 13-minute track which twists, turns, and eventually builds up to... an utterly inexplicable bluegrass section. The very next track of the album features an ''accordion breakdown'', complete with vocalist Tommy Rogers growling in a French accent.
7th Jan '17 6:12:36 PM nombretomado
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** Along similar lines, the {{Barenaked Ladies}} song "One Week" ends with repetition of the last line of the chorus: "it'll still be two days till we say we're sorry". But the very last repetition changes it to "Birchmount Stadium, home of the Robbie".

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** Along similar lines, the {{Barenaked Ladies}} Music/BarenakedLadies song "One Week" ends with repetition of the last line of the chorus: "it'll still be two days till we say we're sorry". But the very last repetition changes it to "Birchmount Stadium, home of the Robbie".
6th Jan '17 9:07:14 AM TudorRose
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* Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.



* "Bring the Boys Back Home" off ''[[Music/PinkFloyd The Wall]]''. Who are "the boys" and what do they have to do with the main character, Pink? Is it a reference to the war Pink's father died in? If so, why does it show all the way near the end of the second record after that plot point has been buried? And what is this half-minute orchestral chorus bit doing in a rock album that's been the band themselves up to this point?

to:

* "Bring the Boys Back Home" off ''[[Music/PinkFloyd The Wall]]''. Who are "the boys" and what do they have to do with the main character, Pink? Is it a reference to the war Pink's father died in? If so, why does it show all the way near the end of the second record after that plot point has been buried? And what is this half-minute orchestral chorus bit doing in a rock album that's been the band themselves up to this point?point?
* Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.
5th Jan '17 9:37:24 AM TudorRose
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* 60s singer Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.

to:

* 60s singer Oliver's "The Arrangement", from his 1969 debut album ''Good Morning Starshine''. It seems to come out of nowhere with a style that is noticeably different from the rest of the songs. In it, he assumes the role of an impish character with an Irish brogue, trying to make a deal with the listener for a sneezing remedy. At the end, he begins to whisper conspiratorially as the music fades away and then breaks into a fit of hysterical laughter.
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