History BLAM / Film

27th Nov '16 6:53:22 PM Trueman001
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* There's a notorious scene in ''WesternAnimation/TheGoodDinosaur'', where Arlo and Spot eat some fruit which has fermented, and get drunk. This was probably done (1) as an homage to the ''Dumbo'' scene above, and (2) to give them somewhere to slip in the [[RunningGag Luxo Ball]].
26th Nov '16 8:29:38 PM SammyDragon92
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** This scene is then '''immediately''' followed up by yet another [=BLAM=} where during Dill's birth, [[DsineyAcidSequence we suddenly see a CGI animated montage of the history of the universe from the big bang, to Stonehenge, to the Pyramids]] which ends in a bright white flash followed by a close-up of Didi, Stu and the hospital staff's faces from Dill's perspective.

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** This scene is then '''immediately''' followed up by yet another [=BLAM=} [=BLAM=] where during Dill's birth, [[DsineyAcidSequence [[ArtShift we suddenly see a CGI [=CGI=] animated montage of the history of the universe from the big bang, to Stonehenge, to the Pyramids]] which ends in a bright white flash followed by a close-up of Didi, Stu and the hospital staff's faces from Dill's perspective.
26th Nov '16 8:28:17 PM SammyDragon92
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** This scene is then '''immediately''' followed up by yet another [=BLAM=} where during Dill's birth, [[DsineyAcidSequence we suddenly see a CGI animated montage of the history of the universe from the big bang, to Stonehenge, to the Pyramids]] which ends in a bright white flash followed by a close-up of Didi, Stu and the hospital staff's faces from Dill's perspective.
24th Nov '16 7:45:53 AM Furienna
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** ''WesternAnimation/SnoopyComeHome'' has a bizarre sequence where, after Snoopy and Woodstock go to sleep for the night, their spirits rise from their bodies and [[StockFootage repeat all the walking they've done]] amongst psychedelic backgrounds. It's either a dream or a creative montage of the rest of their journey--either way, it's bizarre.

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** ''WesternAnimation/SnoopyComeHome'' has a bizarre sequence where, after Snoopy and Woodstock go to sleep for the night, their spirits rise from their bodies and [[StockFootage repeat all the walking they've done]] amongst psychedelic backgrounds. It's either a dream or a creative montage of the rest of their journey--either journey - either way, it's bizarre.



* The infamous Zion rave from ''Film/TheMatrixReloaded'' -- with Neo and Trinity's [[FetishFuel sex scene]] spliced in for an extra dose of incomprehensibility. It was [[AllThereInTheManual supposedly]] meant to emphasize the blurring of the lines between man and machine. (See also: the blood flowing over the code on the hovercraft terminal, the Merovingian gettin' it on with a human, half the movie's dialogue, and all that other stuff which... didn't involve a solid five minutes of completely random people dancing and [[FanService naked Keanu Reeves]])
** The Train Room (And the Train Man) from ''Film/TheMatrixRevolutions'' -- a scene which, while having enough plot ties to make it not ''completely'' irrelevant, is nonetheless completely forgotten once Neo has been rescued. The strange train station is never seen or referenced again in the film. The Train Man shows up again very briefly as part of the dozen-plus-way standoff at gunpoint later on in the night club, but that's it.

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* The infamous Zion rave from ''Film/TheMatrixReloaded'' -- - with Neo and Trinity's [[FetishFuel sex scene]] spliced in for an extra dose of incomprehensibility. It was [[AllThereInTheManual supposedly]] meant to emphasize the blurring of the lines between man and machine. (See also: the blood flowing over the code on the hovercraft terminal, the Merovingian gettin' it on with a human, half the movie's dialogue, and all that other stuff which... didn't involve a solid five minutes of completely random people dancing and [[FanService naked Keanu Reeves]])
** The Train Room (And the Train Man) from ''Film/TheMatrixRevolutions'' -- - a scene which, while having enough plot ties to make it not ''completely'' irrelevant, is nonetheless completely forgotten once Neo has been rescued. The strange train station is never seen or referenced again in the film. The Train Man shows up again very briefly as part of the dozen-plus-way standoff at gunpoint later on in the night club, but that's it.



-->"That sound you heard was your inner child being punched in the face." -- Everything is Terrible

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-->"That sound you heard was your inner child being punched in the face." -- - Everything is Terrible



** "Is there something you'd like to share with the rest of us, Amazing Larry!?!" This one has an explanation: Amazing Larry was supposed to be a magician in the beginning of the film who asked Pee Wee for advice on what new hairstyle he should get. The setup was cut out but the payoff -- him settling on a ridiculous mohawk -- was left in. So we're just left with a guy named Amazing Larry with a crazy haircut.

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** "Is there something you'd like to share with the rest of us, Amazing Larry!?!" This one has an explanation: Amazing Larry was supposed to be a magician in the beginning of the film who asked Pee Wee for advice on what new hairstyle he should get. The setup was cut out but the payoff -- - him settling on a ridiculous mohawk -- - was left in. So we're just left with a guy named Amazing Larry with a crazy haircut.



* Arguably a Big Lipped Alligator Movie, or at very least a deliberately surreal AnachronismStew, Julie Taymor's ''Film/{{Titus}}'' -- a [[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs modern adaptation]] of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus'' -- features a scene in which one of the villains, played by Creator/JonathanRhysMeyers, dances terrifyingly on a pool table to loud techno music, trussed up in red leather and with his hair in pigtails. It isn't the ''strangest'' scene in the movie by a long way, and it certainly isn't the most disturbing, but it's notable in that it contains no dialogue, has absolutely no basis in the original play (obviously), does nothing to further the plot, is never referenced again, and serves no purpose beyond making the audience just a little bit more amused/baffled/emotionally scarred than they already were.

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* Arguably a Big Lipped Alligator Movie, or at very least a deliberately surreal AnachronismStew, Julie Taymor's ''Film/{{Titus}}'' -- - a [[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs modern adaptation]] of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/TitusAndronicus'' -- - features a scene in which one of the villains, played by Creator/JonathanRhysMeyers, dances terrifyingly on a pool table to loud techno music, trussed up in red leather and with his hair in pigtails. It isn't the ''strangest'' scene in the movie by a long way, and it certainly isn't the most disturbing, but it's notable in that it contains no dialogue, has absolutely no basis in the original play (obviously), does nothing to further the plot, is never referenced again, and serves no purpose beyond making the audience just a little bit more amused/baffled/emotionally scarred than they already were.



** An interesting version in which the Twins adopt a Big Lipped Alligator Mode -- that is, a 1930's ice cream truck. The bizarreness of this vehicle mode is never explained and is only seen for about two minutes (in all its scenes combined) before they decide to change vehicle modes again. Their odd choice of form is never mentioned again.

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** An interesting version in which the Twins adopt a Big Lipped Alligator Mode -- - that is, a 1930's ice cream truck. The bizarreness of this vehicle mode is never explained and is only seen for about two minutes (in all its scenes combined) before they decide to change vehicle modes again. Their odd choice of form is never mentioned again.



* ''Film/AnAmericanWerewolfInLondon'' has a scene where the main character is at home with his family, and then they're attacked by machine-gun wielding Nazi werewolves. It was all a dream, which explains why David is initially so certain that Jack's visits are just dreams, and the scene also introduces the audience to David's family, who is otherwise never seen in the movie, which adds a little weight to the scene where he calls home to say goodbye to them before his planned suicide -- but otherwise, what does this have to do with the rest of the movie? Nothing whatsoever, that's what.

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* ''Film/AnAmericanWerewolfInLondon'' has a scene where the main character is at home with his family, and then they're attacked by machine-gun wielding Nazi werewolves. It was all a dream, which explains why David is initially so certain that Jack's visits are just dreams, and the scene also introduces the audience to David's family, who is otherwise never seen in the movie, which adds a little weight to the scene where he calls home to say goodbye to them before his planned suicide -- - but otherwise, what does this have to do with the rest of the movie? Nothing whatsoever, that's what.



** Sadly, the climax of the movie is also an example. All of a sudden, we have a lead Morlock who is far more humanoid than the others, inexplicably has psychic powers, speaks almost entirely in exposition (and on some subjects he couldn't possibly know about), and even hints that Hartdegan's adventures in time travel somehow created the Morlocks, without explaining further. His presence makes some sense from a meta perspective -- the film obviously wants an [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech intelligent]] adversary for Hartdegan, something the other, more feral Morlocks can't provide -- but it's still jarring.

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** Sadly, the climax of the movie is also an example. All of a sudden, we have a lead Morlock who is far more humanoid than the others, inexplicably has psychic powers, speaks almost entirely in exposition (and on some subjects he couldn't possibly know about), and even hints that Hartdegan's adventures in time travel somehow created the Morlocks, without explaining further. His presence makes some sense from a meta perspective -- - the film obviously wants an [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech intelligent]] adversary for Hartdegan, something the other, more feral Morlocks can't provide -- - but it's still jarring.
22nd Nov '16 3:33:43 AM fearlessnikki
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*** There's also two different scenes of an incessantly twittering bluebird flying around as a scene transition that serve absolutely no purpose.

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*** There's ** Also in ''Prisoner of Azkaban'' there's also two different scenes of an incessantly twittering bluebird flying around as a scene transition that serve absolutely no purpose.purpose. Deleted scenes reveal the sequence was even longer - with the bird spending a good minute bothering Hagrid by buzzing around his head.


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* The Irish indie film ''Life's A Breeze'' is mostly a SliceOfLife about a girl trying to help her grandmother find a mattress that her relatives had thrown out (that contained all her life savings). That plot gets put on hold for two scenes that serve no purpose: first is the grandmother's birthday party where her children reveal they've hired a stripper. Second is a lengthy sequence where grandmother and granddaughter trick her slob of a son into thinking they've won the lottery - with a pre-recorded video on the TV. This sequence lasts five minutes and also appears rather out of character for the two - as the mean-spirited prank is completely at odds with their previous characterizations. It's not mentioned again.
17th Nov '16 11:52:56 AM WoodyAlien3rd
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* in ''Film/PetSematary'', Louis is carrying Gage's body to the Indian burial ground and hallucinates that a mound of rocks turns into an angry face that screams at him. It's probably supposed to represent the malevolent influence that the ground has on people, but the sequence lasts a couple of seconds, feels weird and adds nothing to the story.
25th Oct '16 2:36:56 PM rafi
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* In the sequel ''Film/TheNeverEndingStoryIII'', the Rock Biter, whose home now contains a TV for his kid to watch music videos on (?!), takes off on his bike and sings "Born To Be Wild". To make it worse, the scene gets replayed over the end credits in lieu of the [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic classic theme song]].

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* In the sequel ''Film/TheNeverEndingStoryIII'', ''Film/TheNeverendingStory III'', the Rock Biter, whose home now contains a TV for his kid to watch music videos on (?!), takes off on his bike and sings "Born To Be Wild". To make it worse, the scene gets replayed over the end credits in lieu of the [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic classic theme song]].
18th Oct '16 5:36:02 PM bobwolf
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Storks}}'': Pigeon Toady singing "How You Like Me Now" with a music video sequence accompanying him in the background. It immediately segues into him [[spoiler: blabbing to Hunter what Junior and Tulip are doing]], but even so...
8th Oct '16 12:18:24 AM IncandescentSmack
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* ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' has a rather infamous scene where Timothy and Dumbo get drunk. Dumbo starts blowing bubbles with his trunk, and one of them changes into a Pink Elephant. What insues is nonsensical and terrifying, with the Pink Elephants antics getting wilder and more erratic as the scene continues, until the climax, when they turn into veichales for some reason, and all crash into each other. The scene is never referred to for the rest of the film, and is arguably the most famous example of a BLAM, even when compared to the Trope Namer.

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* ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' has a rather infamous scene where Timothy and Dumbo get drunk. Dumbo starts blowing bubbles with his trunk, and one of them changes into a Pink Elephant. What insues is nonsensical and terrifying, with the Pink Elephants antics getting wilder and more erratic as the scene continues, until the climax, when they turn into veichales vehicles for some reason, and all crash into each other. The scene is never referred to for the rest of the film, and is arguably the most famous example of a BLAM, even when compared to the Trope Namer.
2nd Oct '16 6:33:01 AM Massimo
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* The encounter with the Watcher in the Water in ''Film/TheLordofTheRings'' comes across as this. Even in the book the scene comes out of nowhere, (save as a ShoutOut to HPLovecraft by Tolkien) but at least Merry questions what it was that just attacked the fellowship, to which Gandalf responds 'There are older and fouler things than orcs in the deep places of the world.' In the film version this line is used as foreshadowing for the Balrog, and with an additional mention of the Watcher omitted from the book found in Balin's tomb, it's jarring that not one of the fellowship wonders why they just had to fight off a giant squid.

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* The encounter with the Watcher in the Water in ''Film/TheLordofTheRings'' ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' comes across as this. Even in the book the scene comes out of nowhere, (save as a ShoutOut to HPLovecraft by Tolkien) but at least Merry questions what it was that just attacked the fellowship, to which Gandalf responds 'There are older and fouler things than orcs in the deep places of the world.' In the film version this line is used as foreshadowing for the Balrog, and with an additional mention of the Watcher omitted from the book found in Balin's tomb, it's jarring that not one of the fellowship wonders why they just had to fight off a giant squid.
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