History BLAM / Film

6th Dec '17 5:23:53 PM nombretomado
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* In ''Film/AcrossTheUniverse'', the characters are stranded in some grassy field, where they come across some crazy carnival (that looks suspiciously DaveMcKean-esque) and watch giant "blue people" on stilts dance around Creator/EddieIzzard, apparently channeling [[TheLeagueOfGentlemen Papa Lazarou]], who screams out a somehow more nonsensical version of the Beatles song, "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite". Plus, Prudence, the lesbian cheerleader, shows up out of nowhere in a horse suit and dances among a crazy background of cutout tigers and moving dummies and disappears just as suddenly. The characters' reaction is "Oh, so that's where Prudence went!" They then go out into the now normal-looking field with her. They never comment on the carnival afterward. It has no relevance or plot in the story other than making reference to a crazy Beatles song - [[RuleOfCool still doesn't make it any less awesome though]].

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* In ''Film/AcrossTheUniverse'', the characters are stranded in some grassy field, where they come across some crazy carnival (that looks suspiciously DaveMcKean-esque) Creator/DaveMcKean-esque) and watch giant "blue people" on stilts dance around Creator/EddieIzzard, apparently channeling [[TheLeagueOfGentlemen Papa Lazarou]], who screams out a somehow more nonsensical version of the Beatles song, "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite". Plus, Prudence, the lesbian cheerleader, shows up out of nowhere in a horse suit and dances among a crazy background of cutout tigers and moving dummies and disappears just as suddenly. The characters' reaction is "Oh, so that's where Prudence went!" They then go out into the now normal-looking field with her. They never comment on the carnival afterward. It has no relevance or plot in the story other than making reference to a crazy Beatles song - [[RuleOfCool still doesn't make it any less awesome though]].
24th Nov '17 2:12:54 AM RedScharlach
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* In the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} and the Big Fight'', Getafix has been hit on the head with a menhir and lost his memory. Suddenly, Cacofonix declares he's going to sing a song to jog his memory, twirls his cape, and sucks the film into a DisneyAcidSequence in which he morphs into a modern rock-star appearance with an electric guitar and psychedelic, twirling limbs, then performs a strange 80s pop-rock song with about ten different words about Getafix being knocked on the head. The song is particularly weird because the whole concept of Cacofonix is that he is a DreadfulMusician and his voice in the song is not that bad - also because Fulliautomatix is in his backing choir, despite his character's raison d'être being to hit Cacofonix whenever he tries to sing. It's also unclear how the song is supposed to jog anyone's memory, considering it specifically describes a situation that has only just happened, with the least strange part of it being the concept of 80s rock existing in Roman-occupied Gaul. This goes on for a while until Fulliautomatix hits Cacofonix (transforming his neck into a jack-in-the-box concertina within the song-world), and we go back to reality where Asterix and Obelix simply take Getafix away. Here is the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8xSf98q7sc the whole scene in all it's madness]].

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* In the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} and the Big Fight'', Getafix has been hit on the head with a menhir and lost his memory. Suddenly, Cacofonix declares he's going to sing a song to jog his memory, twirls his cape, and sucks the film into a DisneyAcidSequence in which he morphs into a modern rock-star appearance with an electric guitar and psychedelic, twirling limbs, then performs a strange 80s pop-rock song with about ten different words about Getafix being knocked on the head. The song is particularly weird because the whole concept of Cacofonix is that he is a DreadfulMusician and his voice in the song is not that bad - also because Fulliautomatix is in his backing choir, despite his character's raison d'être being to hit Cacofonix whenever he tries to sing. It's also unclear how the song is supposed to jog anyone's memory, considering it specifically describes a situation that has only just happened, with the least strange part of it being the concept of 80s rock existing in Roman-occupied Gaul. This goes on for a while until Fulliautomatix hits Cacofonix (transforming his neck into a jack-in-the-box concertina within the song-world), and we go back to reality where Asterix and Obelix simply take Getafix away. Here is the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8xSf98q7sc the whole scene in all it's its madness]].



* ''WesternAnimation/TheFearlessFour'' as a whole takes some ''immense'' liberties from it's [[Literature/TheBremenTownMusicians source material]], but nothing in the movie prepares the viewer for the scene showing the donkey's establishing scene. It plays out fairly normally - musical number showing his hardships, a demonstration of his owner's cruelty and finally him being deemed too old and useless to live -, but then it concludes with the owner calling [[AcmeProducts Mix Max]] for ''something'' to replace the donkey. This something, mind you, is a '''''gigantic mechanical [[OurCentaursAreDifferent centaur]]''''', who then produces to sing a rock VillainSong while running around aimlessly and playing basket ball with flour sacks, before throwing the donkey into the same truck that unloaded him there. Keep in mind that this is a fairly normal AnimatedAdaptation; other than the animals talking, there are no fantasy or sci-fi elements to the story. The mechanical centaur literally has no reason to exist other than just "because", [[SurrealHumor but damn it he is entertaining]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFearlessFour'' as a whole takes some ''immense'' liberties from it's its [[Literature/TheBremenTownMusicians source material]], but nothing in the movie prepares the viewer for the scene showing the donkey's establishing scene. It plays out fairly normally - musical number showing his hardships, a demonstration of his owner's cruelty and finally him being deemed too old and useless to live -, but then it concludes with the owner calling [[AcmeProducts Mix Max]] for ''something'' to replace the donkey. This something, mind you, is a '''''gigantic mechanical [[OurCentaursAreDifferent centaur]]''''', who then produces to sing a rock VillainSong while running around aimlessly and playing basket ball with flour sacks, before throwing the donkey into the same truck that unloaded him there. Keep in mind that this is a fairly normal AnimatedAdaptation; other than the animals talking, there are no fantasy or sci-fi elements to the story. The mechanical centaur literally has no reason to exist other than just "because", [[SurrealHumor but damn it he is entertaining]].



* ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' has one. "The Silly Song" segment, even though it's not per-se surreal, but it does come out of nowhere with no build up and is never mentioned again after it's over. Even though it is entertaining, it doesn't really progress the story. You can literally skip this whole segment and go straight to the next segment that follows it, and the movie would make just as much sense. Even in-universe the characters are just doing it to amuse themselves.

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* ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' has one. "The Silly Song" segment, even though it's not per-se surreal, segment isn't surreal per se, but it does come out of nowhere with no build up build-up and is never mentioned again after it's over. Even though it is entertaining, it doesn't really progress the story. You can literally skip this whole segment and go straight to the next segment that follows it, and the movie would make just as much sense. Even in-universe the characters are just doing it to amuse themselves.



* Dr. Seuss' ''Film/TheCatInTheHat'' combines this with HappyPlace. The Cat poses as a piñata at a birthday party and in the process is hit in the crotch with a large baseball bat. Cut to a peaceful, serene neighborhood where the Cat is dressed in pink and playing on a swing next to a unicorn. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpxwtAII3K8&feature=share Soundtrack by Lionel Ritchie.]]

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* Dr. Seuss' ''Film/TheCatInTheHat'' combines this with HappyPlace. The Cat poses as a piñata at a birthday party and in the process is hit in the crotch with a large baseball bat. Cut to a peaceful, serene neighborhood where the Cat is dressed in pink and playing on a swing next to a unicorn. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpxwtAII3K8&feature=share Soundtrack by Lionel Ritchie.Richie.]]



* ''Cheyenne Autumn'' (1964). Creator/JohnFord understandably felt that this downbeat Western, a grim depiction of the Cheyenne exodus from Oklahoma to the Dakotas, needed some comic relief. Less understandable is the result: a 15 minute, self-contained sequence showing Dodge City's white citizens panicking at the Cheyenne's approach. It features none of the main characters, focusing instead on Creator/JimmyStewart as a corrupt, card-playing Wyatt Earp, has nothing to do with the main story and plays as broad slapstick. Indeed, it's so jarringly dissonant that most theaters removed the entire scene.

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* ''Cheyenne Autumn'' (1964). Creator/JohnFord understandably felt that this downbeat Western, a grim depiction of the Cheyenne exodus from Oklahoma to the Dakotas, needed some comic relief. Less understandable is the result: a 15 minute, 15-minute, self-contained sequence showing Dodge City's white citizens panicking at the Cheyenne's Cheyennes' approach. It features none of the main characters, focusing instead on Creator/JimmyStewart as a corrupt, card-playing Wyatt Earp, has nothing to do with the main story and plays as broad slapstick. Indeed, it's so jarringly dissonant that most theaters removed the entire scene.



* In ''Film/EarthGirlsAreEasy'', after Vallerie has sex with Mac, she has a surreal black and white sci-fi dream. Oddly enough, it does [[ItMakesSenseInContext make sense in context]] with Vallerie realizing she's in a relationship with an alien and all. The fact that it's never brought up again, though...
* While ''Film/ElTopo'' is essentially one long acid-trip of a movie, it begins with it's largest WTF moment when the title character is seen riding through the desert with a naked boy of perhaps 5 or 6 behind him. The fact that this child, apparently El Topo's son, is completely naked is never mentioned or explained. And then the child is just abandoned at a monastery so his father can ride off with a woman he just met. Sense is not to be found in this entire film, but this bit is just incomprehensible.

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* In ''Film/EarthGirlsAreEasy'', after Vallerie Valerie has sex with Mac, she has a surreal black and white sci-fi dream. Oddly enough, it does [[ItMakesSenseInContext make sense in context]] with Vallerie Valerie realizing she's in a relationship with an alien and all. The fact that it's never brought up again, though...
* While ''Film/ElTopo'' is essentially one long acid-trip of a movie, it begins with it's its largest WTF moment when the title character is seen riding through the desert with a naked boy of perhaps 5 or 6 behind him. The fact that this child, apparently El Topo's son, is completely naked is never mentioned or explained. And then the child is just abandoned at a monastery so his father can ride off with a woman he just met. Sense is not to be found in this entire film, but this bit is just incomprehensible.



* ''Film/TheHangoverPartIII'': The scene when the Wolfpack accidently let out the cockfighting chickens and they attack them, causing them to run around screaming and that prompts Chow to nearly shoot Stu while shooting at the chickens. It has no point other than to try to elicit laughs from an audience for how ridiculous and over-the-top it is. Even by Hangover standards, this really did nothing for anyone.

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* ''Film/TheHangoverPartIII'': The scene when the Wolfpack accidently accidentally let out the cockfighting chickens and they attack them, causing them to run around screaming and that prompts Chow to nearly shoot Stu while shooting at the chickens. It has no point other than to try to elicit laughs from an audience for how ridiculous and over-the-top it is. Even by Hangover standards, this really did nothing for anyone.



** The scene in which Sharpay coaxes Troy into singing an annoyingly more upbeat version of "You Are the Music in Me". Itís sort meant to play towards the plotline involving Sharpay trying to win Troy over and how she makes him uncomfortable too with all her affection (and how much of a sharp contrast she is to Gabriella). Despite that and that it could sort of be seen as a DarkReprise, it doesnít hold any other bearing on the plot and didnít really need to be there. Itís not helped that Troy imagines her in a wedding dress right after for no real reason. Itís easy to see why this was the last scene in the movie filmed.

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** The scene in which Sharpay coaxes Troy into singing an annoyingly more upbeat version of "You Are the Music in Me". Itís sort of meant to play towards the plotline involving Sharpay trying to win Troy over and how she makes him uncomfortable too with all her affection (and how much of a sharp contrast she is to Gabriella). Despite that and that it could sort of be seen as a DarkReprise, it doesnít hold any other bearing on the plot and didnít really need to be there. Itís not helped that Troy imagines her in a wedding dress right after for no real reason. Itís easy to see why this was the last scene in the movie filmed.



* In ''Film/{{UHF}}'' Weird Al's character, George is seen watching an old rerun of "The Beverly Hillbillies" as he dozes off at his desk, which leads to an odd dream sequence with Weird Al's parody of Dire Strait's "Money for Nothing" simply titled "Beverly Hillbillies," complete with a computer generated music video. While there are several other dream and musical sequences in this movie, this scene is the most out of nowhere. It also adds nothing to the plot and afterward, George awakens and the scene is never mentioned again. Thanks to its mass syndication on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UHF_television_broadcasting UHF channels]] in the 1980s, "The Beverly Hillbillies" was commonplace on just the sort of TV station George is managing. So its a way of introducing actual contemporary UHF television station content into "UHF".

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* In ''Film/{{UHF}}'' Weird Al's character, George is seen watching an old rerun of "The Beverly Hillbillies" as he dozes off at his desk, which leads to an odd dream sequence with Weird Al's parody of Dire Strait's Straits' "Money for Nothing" simply titled "Beverly Hillbillies," complete with a computer generated music video. While there are several other dream and musical sequences in this movie, this scene is the most out of nowhere. It also adds nothing to the plot and afterward, George awakens and the scene is never mentioned again. Thanks to its mass syndication on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UHF_television_broadcasting UHF channels]] in the 1980s, "The Beverly Hillbillies" was commonplace on just the sort of TV station George is managing. So its a way of introducing actual contemporary UHF television station content into "UHF".
31st Oct '17 7:47:14 PM PaulA
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* In the movie version of ''Literature/DiaryOfAWimpyKid'', there is [[ThatRemindsMeOfASong a moment]] at the mother-son dance when Rowley and his mother do a dance to Intergalactic by the Beastie Boys.

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* In the movie version of ''Literature/DiaryOfAWimpyKid'', ''Film/DiaryOfAWimpyKid'', there is [[ThatRemindsMeOfASong a moment]] at the mother-son dance when Rowley and his mother do a dance to Intergalactic "Intergalactic" by the Beastie Boys.
29th Oct '17 9:03:06 PM Darth_Marth
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* The encounter with the Watcher in the Water in ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' comes across as this. Even in the book the scene comes out of nowhere, (save as a ShoutOut to Creator/HPLovecraft by Tolkien) but at least Merry questions what it was that just attacked the fellowship, to which Gandalf responds 'There are older and fouler things than orcs in the deep places of the world.' In the film version this line is used as foreshadowing for the Balrog, and with an additional mention of the Watcher omitted from the book found in Balin's tomb, it's jarring that not one of the fellowship wonders why they just had to fight off a giant squid.
8th Oct '17 9:33:27 AM nombretomado
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* In the {{Bollywood}} movie ''Film/DariyaDil'', a camera pans to two costumes: Franchise/{{Superman}} and ComicBook/SpiderWoman. The lead couple is then shown dancing and flying around town in their costumes, singing "Too Mera Superman". The song ends with "Superman" in jail.

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* In the {{Bollywood}} UsefulNotes/{{Bollywood}} movie ''Film/DariyaDil'', a camera pans to two costumes: Franchise/{{Superman}} and ComicBook/SpiderWoman. The lead couple is then shown dancing and flying around town in their costumes, singing "Too Mera Superman". The song ends with "Superman" in jail.
6th Oct '17 11:02:02 AM fearlessnikki
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** [[{{Narm}} The infamous pancake scene]] and the weird rabbit surgeon. Or, as WebVideo/{{Phelous}} refers to them, "Big Crocodile Scene Happenings." The BLAM is tripled when you read the end credits and find out that the Bunny was played by "We'll Never Tell".
** There was also the "This gun is fo' niggas." line and how it [[BrickJoke come back at the end]]. Just... what?

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** [[{{Narm}} When Burt gets infected, he stops by the local shop for help. The infamous pancake scene]] kid Dennis (who had previously been established to bite people) bites him, gets infected and prompts the workers to hunt Burt down. The part that isn't plot relevant? Dennis randomly screaming "pancakes!" at Burt and doing some weird karate moves before biting him. Apparently Eli Roth saw the young actor practising between takes and added it in.
** Later when Dennis is in the hospital, you can see someone in a giant
rabbit surgeon. Or, costume giving him balloons. Possibly meant to be surreal as WebVideo/{{Phelous}} refers to them, "Big Crocodile Scene Happenings." The BLAM Paul is tripled when you read led through the end credits and find out that hospital, but still bizarre. And in the Bunny was played by credits, "We'll Never Tell".
** There was also
Tell" is listed beside the "This rabbit.
** When the kids first go into the shop, the shopkeeper says the
gun on the wall is fo' niggas." line "for niggers" - implying he's a racist. At the very end of the film, a gang of black youths go into the shop to collect the gun and how it [[BrickJoke come back at exchange banter with the end]]. Just... what?shopkeeper. Beyond a minor gag, this contributes nothing to the plot.



* ''Film/DarlingLili'' has a brief moment where after Lili discovers Bill hasn't been lying to her - she hurries to the front door to catch him. She goes through a bedroom and briefly finds her chauffeur and maid in bed together. This is completely random, adds nothing to the story and the two never give a hint of being a couple elsewhere in the film.



** ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndTheGobletofFire Goblet of Fire]]'' has a number of these, thanks to a lot of the subplots from the book being cut out, but leaving certain scenes intact from the book in the film, and in some cases, actually filmed why something was plot-relevant but cut it from the final movie. The best example, though, is probably [[spoiler: Crouch Sr's death]]. Comes totally out of nowhere after one of the tasks, doesn't fit in with the atmosphere or even the scene (the Trio and Hagrid are walking through the Forest of their own volition, something nobody does. All but Harry are singing the school song, and Harry has wandered off from the group in the forest that nobody should go in alone. On finding the body, instead of telling Hagrid who's very near, he goes to Dumbledore's office), and thanks to leading into the Penseive scene goes nowhere and doesn't matter at all, and is literally never brought up again, since Harry doesn't tell Dumbledore why he came to his office (possibly because the scenes take place at two different parts of the book)

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** ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndTheGobletofFire Goblet of Fire]]'' has a number of these, thanks to a lot of the subplots from the book being cut out, but leaving certain scenes intact from the book in the film, and in some cases, actually filmed why something was plot-relevant but cut it from the final movie. The best example, though, is probably [[spoiler: Crouch Sr's death]]. Comes totally out of nowhere after one of the tasks, doesn't fit in with the atmosphere or even the scene (the Trio and Hagrid are walking through the Forest of their own volition, something nobody does. All but Harry are singing the school song, and Harry has wandered off from the group in the forest that nobody should go in alone. On finding the body, instead of telling Hagrid who's very near, he goes to Dumbledore's office), and thanks to leading into the Penseive scene goes nowhere and doesn't matter at all, and is literally never brought up again, since Harry doesn't tell Dumbledore why he came to his office (possibly because the scenes take place at two different parts of the book)book). Harry also displays [[AngstWhatAngst zero angst afterwards]] about finding a dead body in the woods.


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* The 1970 B movie ''Trog'' has a scene where the titular Trog (a human-ape hybrid) is put under hypnotism and 'remembers' seeing a fight between two dinosaurs. The film literally stops so this dinosaur fight can go on for ten minutes. Its very existence in the movie results in ArtisticLicenceHistory; if Trog is the missing link between man and ape then he wouldn't have been around at the same time as the dinosaurs.
3rd Oct '17 7:27:06 AM louisXVI
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* It could easily be argued that the ''majority'' of songs in the ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' are BLAMs. Even some of the most iconic ones, like "Time Warp," "I Can Make You a Man," and ''especially'' "Hot Patootie" don't propel the plot forward in any way and often have lyrics that seem to have been written in some completely different context. This is, of course, a large part of the film's cult appeal.

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* It could easily be argued that the ''majority'' of songs in the ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' are BLAMs.BLAMS. Even some of the most iconic ones, like "Time Warp," "I Can Make You a Man," and ''especially'' "Hot Patootie" don't propel the plot forward in any way and often have lyrics that seem to have been written in some completely different context. This is, of course, a large part of the film's cult appeal.
3rd Oct '17 7:26:39 AM louisXVI
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* It could easily be argued that the ''majority'' of songs in the ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' are BLAMS. Even some of the most iconic ones, like "Time Warp," "I Can Make You a Man," and ''especially'' "Hot Patootie" don't propel the plot forward in any way and often have lyrics that seem to have been written in some completely different context. This is, of course, a large part of the film's cult appeal.

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* It could easily be argued that the ''majority'' of songs in the ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' are BLAMS.BLAMs. Even some of the most iconic ones, like "Time Warp," "I Can Make You a Man," and ''especially'' "Hot Patootie" don't propel the plot forward in any way and often have lyrics that seem to have been written in some completely different context. This is, of course, a large part of the film's cult appeal.
3rd Oct '17 7:25:24 AM louisXVI
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* Even though it's a very brief moment, the Zen Room from ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' certainly counts. It's only shown for two seconds, has random wipe-out cuts, and is never mentioned again.

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* It could easily be argued that the ''majority'' of songs in the ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' are BLAMS. Even some of the most iconic ones, like "Time Warp," "I Can Make You a Man," and ''especially'' "Hot Patootie" don't propel the plot forward in any way and often have lyrics that seem to have been written in some completely different context. This is, of course, a large part of the film's cult appeal.
**
Even though it's a very brief moment, the Zen Room from ''Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow'' certainly counts. It's only shown for two seconds, has random wipe-out cuts, and is never mentioned again.
24th Sep '17 11:38:47 AM Trueman001
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* {{Trope Namer|s}}: ''WesternAnimation/AllDogsGoToHeaven'' includes a [[DerangedAnimation bizarre and nonsensical]] [[DisneyAcidSequence musical number]] with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin a big lipped alligator]] near the end of the film. Two of the three main protagonists fall into a cave where they are brought by a WackyWaysideTribe to meet their leader, King Gator, who breaks into an Esther Williams tribute. The scene not only comes out of nowhere with only very little build-up beforehand, but it [[BeyondTheImpossible violates the rules of the movie]]: animals can only speak to members of their own species, with Anne Marie being the only being who can communicate with everyone. Yet the Gator and Charlie can share a cross-species musical number. Ironically, the trope namer is NotAnExample: while it certainly comes out of nowhere and is strange even in-context, it actually sets up a couple important plot elements - Anne Marie gets sick as a result of being in the water for too long, and Charlie's musical-sounding howl that makes King Gator fond of him (and kicks off the musical number) ends up coming back in the ending, his pained howl summoning back the alligator at the end [[spoiler: [[AndroclesLion to save Charlie and kill Carface]]]]. It is more of a RandomEventsPlot moment than this trope.

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* {{Trope Namer|s}}: ''WesternAnimation/AllDogsGoToHeaven'' includes a [[DerangedAnimation bizarre and nonsensical]] [[DisneyAcidSequence musical number]] with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin a big lipped alligator]] near the end of the film. Two of the three main protagonists fall into a cave where they are brought by a WackyWaysideTribe to meet their leader, King Gator, who breaks into an Esther Williams tribute. The scene not only comes out of nowhere with only very little build-up beforehand, but it [[BeyondTheImpossible violates the rules of the movie]]: animals can only speak to members of their own species, with Anne Marie being the only being who can communicate with everyone. Yet the Gator and Charlie can share a cross-species musical number. Ironically, the trope namer is NotAnExample: while it certainly comes out of nowhere and is strange even in-context, it actually sets up a couple important plot elements - Anne Marie gets sick as a result of being in the water for too long, and Charlie's musical-sounding howl that makes King Gator fond of him (and kicks off the musical number) ends up coming back in the ending, his pained howl summoning back the alligator at the end [[spoiler: [[AndroclesLion to save Charlie and kill Carface]]]]. It is more of a RandomEventsPlot moment than this trope.
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