History AwesomeMusic / TheBeatles

15th Oct '17 5:53:15 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "I've got blisters on my fingers!!" anyone? The fact that they kept Ringo's cry of exasperation into the song is Awesome on its own, too. Some people went as far as to call "Helter Skelter" "The first proto-Metal roar" or even "The first HeavyMetal song".

to:

* "Birthday" may be a slight, straightforward rocker and nothing more, but it's such good fun that it's hard to resist Paul's entreaties that we get up and dance, and the guitar riff in the verses is one of the Beatles' biggest {{Ear Worm}}s.
* Although George embraced Transcendental Meditation for the rest of his life, John was starting to grow disillusioned with it and especially with the movement's leader, the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the [[TakeThat target]] of "Sexy Sadie". A gloriously assembled song with double tracked piano and close backup vocal harmonies, it is guided by John's lead vocal that emphasises his bitter disappointment as he lays into the man he had come to see as a fraud after having once hung on his every word - but with his name (and gender) concealed within a song that, on the surface, seems to be a diatribe against a dishonest former lover.
* If you need proof that Paul wasn't just writing the SillyLoveSongs that resulted in backlash songs from John and George by 1968, look no further than the raw adrenaline of "Helter Skelter", all heavily amplified lead guitar, weighty bass guitar, pounding drums, and throat-destroying vocals from Paul, all building up to Ringo's final cry of exasperation:
"I've got blisters on my fingers!!" anyone? The fact that they kept Ringo's cry of exasperation into this in the finished song is Awesome on its own, too. Some people went as far as to call "Helter Skelter" "The first proto-Metal roar" or even "The first HeavyMetal song".[[note]] One of the studio takes went on for [[EpicRocking 27 minutes]]; fans continue to harbour hope that it will see a legitimate release on an ''Anthology''-like compilation some day.[[/note]]
15th Oct '17 3:03:11 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The backing vocalists for the song include [[Music/TheRollingStones Mick Jagger and Keith Richards]] and Jagger's then-girlfriend Marianne Faithfull, while [[Music/TheWho Keith Moon]] played brush drums alongside Ringo (both Jagger and Moon can be seen in the ''Our World'' broadcast). In other words, the song features performances by members of perhaps ''the'' three most influential bands of TheBritishInvasion. (Further backing vocals are provided by Music/EricClapton and Music/TheHollies' Graham Nash, among many others.)

to:

** The backing vocalists for the song include [[Music/TheRollingStones Mick Jagger and Keith Richards]] and Jagger's then-girlfriend Marianne Faithfull, while [[Music/TheWho Keith Moon]] played brush drums alongside Ringo (both Jagger and Moon can be seen in the ''Our World'' broadcast). In other words, the song features performances by members of perhaps ''the'' three most influential bands of TheBritishInvasion.UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion. (Further backing vocals are provided by Music/EricClapton and Music/TheHollies' Graham Nash, among many others.)
10th Jun '17 8:39:13 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "If I Needed Someone" is arguably George's first truly great moment as a songwriter. When you've got a standout track on an album like ''Rubber Soul'', you know you're going somewhere. A guitar riff which pays homage to Music/TheByrds' cover of "The Bells of Rhymney", spine-chilling chorus harmonies, and Paul's hypnotic rising bassline makes this one an absolute keeper.

to:

* "If I Needed Someone" is arguably one of George's first truly great moment moments as a songwriter. When you've got a standout track on an album like ''Rubber Soul'', you know you're going somewhere. A guitar riff which pays homage to Music/TheByrds' cover of "The Bells of Rhymney", spine-chilling chorus harmonies, and Paul's hypnotic rising bassline makes this one an absolute keeper.
10th Jun '17 11:35:17 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The song's message may seem like wide-eyed optimism today, but it still stands as one of the anthems of the Summer of Love during which it was written, and John sings the lead vocal with real conviction - it was a message he firmly believed in. The whirlwind of other melodic fragments in the song - "[[UsefulNotes/{{France}} La Marseillaise]]", [[Creator/JohannSebastianBach Bach's]] Two-Part Invention No.8, Music/GlennMiller's "In the Mood", "Greensleeves", and the Beatles' own [[MusicalNod "She Loves You" and "Yesterday"]] - make for one of their most universal songs.

to:

** The song's message may seem like wide-eyed optimism today, but it still stands as one of the anthems of the Summer of Love during which it was written, and John sings the lead vocal with real conviction - it was a message he firmly believed in. The whirlwind of other melodic fragments in the song - "[[UsefulNotes/{{France}} La Marseillaise]]", [[Creator/JohannSebastianBach [[Music/JohannSebastianBach Bach's]] Two-Part Invention No.8, Music/GlennMiller's "In the Mood", "Greensleeves", and the Beatles' own [[MusicalNod "She Loves You" and "Yesterday"]] - make for one of their most universal songs.
3rd Jun '17 11:15:11 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand'' isn't ''always'' at the top of lists of Greatest Albums Ever, but it's usually at least found near the top - it's a Crowning Album of Awesome from the first strains of an orchestra tuning up to the final piano crash in "A Day in the Life".

to:

''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand'' isn't ''always'' at the top of lists of Greatest Albums Ever, but it's usually at least found near the top - it's a Crowning whole Album of Awesome from the first strains of an orchestra tuning up to the final piano crash in "A Day in the Life".



** The sublime "Something" by George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Music/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.

to:

** The sublime "Something" by George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Music/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks ranked it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.
14th May '17 7:01:56 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The only Beatles original that was released in the UK neither as a single nor on an album is "I Call Your Name", the only original track on the ''Long Tall Sally'' EP from 1964.[[note]] The other tracks were covers; Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally", Larry Williams' "Slow Down", and Carl Perkins' "Matchbox" with a lead vocal by Ringo. "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name" were released as album tracks in the USA on ''The Beatles' Second Album'', while "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" made it onto ''Something New''.[[/note]] The song was originally recorded by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas and released as the B-side to "Bad to Me" (another Lennon-[=McCartney=] track), but John was unimpressed by their version and decided the Beatles should record it; the ska-influenced instrumental bridge is a particular highlight of the Fab Four's version.

to:

* The only Beatles original that was released in the UK neither as a single nor on an album is "I Call Your Name", the only original track on the ''Long Tall Sally'' EP from 1964.[[note]] The other tracks were covers; Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally", Larry Williams' "Slow Down", and Carl Perkins' "Matchbox" with a lead vocal by Ringo. "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name" were released as album tracks in the USA on ''The Beatles' Second Album'', while "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" made it onto ''Something New''.[[/note]] The song was originally recorded by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas and released as the B-side to "Bad to Me" (another Lennon-[=McCartney=] track), but John was unimpressed by their version and decided the Beatles should record it; could do better; he was right, and the ska-influenced instrumental bridge is a particular highlight of the Fab Four's their version.[[note]] It was originally planned for possible inclusion in the soundtrack for ''Film/AHardDaysNight'', but Richard Lester said it was too similar to "You Can't Do That" - which was ultimately also dropped from the film.[[/note]]
14th May '17 6:59:10 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The sublime "Something" by George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Creator/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.

to:

** The sublime "Something" by George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Creator/FrankSinatra Music/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.
14th May '17 6:57:13 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The only Beatles original that was released in the UK neither as a single nor on an album is "I Call Your Name", the only original track on the ''Long Tall Sally'' EP from 1964.[[note]] The other tracks were covers; Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally", Larry Williams' "Slow Down", and Carl Perkins' "Matchbox" with a lead vocal by Ringo. "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name" were released as album tracks in the USA on ''The Beatles' Second Album'', while "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" made it onto ''Something New''.[[/note]] The song was originally recorded by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas and released as the B-side to "Bad to Me" (another Lennon-[=McCartney=] track), but John was unimpressed by their version and decided the Beatles should record it; the ska-influenced instrumental bridge is a particular highlight of the Fab Four's version.
14th May '17 2:35:00 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Side 1 of ''Abbey Road'' contains one classic from each of the four Beatles - the enigmatic "Come Together" by John, the sublime "Something" by George, the bluesy "Oh! Darling" by Paul, and the fun "Octopus' Garden" by Ringo. Meanwhile, in addition to the medley, Side 2 boasts George's infectiously optimistic "Here Comes the Sun" (play hookie from work, hang out in Eric Clapton's garden, write a sunshine and flowers ditty, and get covered by ''everybody'', ''forever'') and the outstanding triple-tracked three-part harmonies of "Because". (The remaining tracks, John's "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" and Paul's "Maxwell's Silver Hammer", are perhaps more divisive, but still have their fans.)

to:

* Side 1 of ''Abbey Road'' contains one classic from each of the four Beatles - the Beatles:
** The
enigmatic "Come Together" by John, John boasts mysterious lyrics about a man identified only as "Old Flat Top", with haunting acoustic guitar and drum accompaniment in the verses that suddenly becomes heavier and electric for the chorus, bridge, and fade-out just in time for the TitleDrop: "Come together, right now, over me!"
** The
sublime "Something" by George, George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Creator/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.
** The
bluesy "Oh! Darling" by Paul, Paul belies any notion that he just wrote silly love songs in the Beatles' later years, with his anguish-laden vocal performance and percussive piano lending a suitable level of gravitas to a song in which he pleads with his lover to re-consider her claim that she doesn't need him anymore. The chord progression in the bridge is especially inventive and effective.
** The
fun "Octopus' Garden" by Ringo. Meanwhile, in addition to Ringo is likewise ''his'' masterpiece as a Beatle, and while that may seem like damning with faint praise when one considers that he only received solo credit on one other Beatles song ("Don't Pass Me By" from the medley, White Album), the catchy tune, fascinating imagery of an undersea refuge from the travails of the surface world, and instrumental performances (including watery sound effects in the bridge) make for a real winner.
** The remaining songs on Side 1, Paul's "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" and John's "I Want You (She's So Heavy)", are more divisive, but still have their moments and their fans; highlights include the LyricalDissonance of a bouncy tune for lyrics about a serial killer and the hammer-on-anvil sound effects in the former, and the weighty guitar riff between the verses of the latter that leads not to a fade-out but to a swell-out that, by the end, sounds like the Beatles are playing in the middle of a hurricane.
*
Side 2 boasts George's infectiously optimistic "Here Comes the Sun" (play Sun". The recipe: play hookie from work, hang out in Eric Clapton's garden, write a sunshine and flowers ditty, and get covered by ''everybody'', ''forever'') ''forever''. The other Beatles' performances, especially Ringo on drums, just make things better.
* Whether or not John's "Because" really does come across as the triplet figure from the opening movement of Beethoven's ''Moonlight'' sonata played backwards, as John claimed was his inspiration, the rich vocal harmonies - three parts
and the outstanding triple-tracked three-part harmonies to create the sense of "Because". (The remaining tracks, John's a chorus of ''nine'' people singing - and haunting melody that seems to cut off in the middle of a phrase make this song, the last one on which the Beatles began work,[[note]] Not the last one they worked on; that would be "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" and Paul's "Maxwell's Silver Hammer", are perhaps more divisive, but still have Me Mine" from ''Let it Be''.[[/note]] one of their fans.)most memorable.
18th Apr '17 5:23:23 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Let It Be" boasts a sublime vocal and keyboard performance by Paul, coupled with a brilliant guitar solo by George (whether in the single or the album version). It was the A-side to the final single released before Paul announced the band's impending dissolution, and although he wasn't exactly living by the sentiments of the song when it came to the infighting that had torn the group apart,[[note]] Though he was the last one to finally abandon any hope that the Beatles could continue as a group, he also never quite repaired his friendships with either John or George before their deaths.[[/note]] his "words of wisdom" provide such a fitting coda to the career of one of the most, if not ''the'' most, iconic and influential groups of the 20th century.

to:

* "Let It Be" boasts a sublime vocal and keyboard performance by Paul, coupled with a brilliant guitar solo by George (whether in the single or the album version). It was the A-side to the final single released in the UK before Paul announced the band's impending dissolution, and although he wasn't exactly living by the sentiments of the song when it came to the infighting that had torn the group apart,[[note]] Though he was the last one to finally abandon any hope that the Beatles could continue as a group, he also never quite repaired his friendships with either John or George before their deaths.[[/note]] his "words of wisdom" provide such a fitting coda to the career of one of the most, if not ''the'' most, iconic and influential groups of the 20th century.
This list shows the last 10 events of 109. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=AwesomeMusic.TheBeatles