History AwesomeMusic / TheBeatles

14th May '17 7:01:56 PM mlsmithca
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* The only Beatles original that was released in the UK neither as a single nor on an album is "I Call Your Name", the only original track on the ''Long Tall Sally'' EP from 1964.[[note]] The other tracks were covers; Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally", Larry Williams' "Slow Down", and Carl Perkins' "Matchbox" with a lead vocal by Ringo. "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name" were released as album tracks in the USA on ''The Beatles' Second Album'', while "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" made it onto ''Something New''.[[/note]] The song was originally recorded by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas and released as the B-side to "Bad to Me" (another Lennon-[=McCartney=] track), but John was unimpressed by their version and decided the Beatles should record it; the ska-influenced instrumental bridge is a particular highlight of the Fab Four's version.

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* The only Beatles original that was released in the UK neither as a single nor on an album is "I Call Your Name", the only original track on the ''Long Tall Sally'' EP from 1964.[[note]] The other tracks were covers; Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally", Larry Williams' "Slow Down", and Carl Perkins' "Matchbox" with a lead vocal by Ringo. "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name" were released as album tracks in the USA on ''The Beatles' Second Album'', while "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" made it onto ''Something New''.[[/note]] The song was originally recorded by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas and released as the B-side to "Bad to Me" (another Lennon-[=McCartney=] track), but John was unimpressed by their version and decided the Beatles should record it; could do better; he was right, and the ska-influenced instrumental bridge is a particular highlight of the Fab Four's their version.[[note]] It was originally planned for possible inclusion in the soundtrack for ''Film/AHardDaysNight'', but Richard Lester said it was too similar to "You Can't Do That" - which was ultimately also dropped from the film.[[/note]]
14th May '17 6:59:10 PM mlsmithca
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** The sublime "Something" by George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Creator/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.

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** The sublime "Something" by George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Creator/FrankSinatra Music/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.
14th May '17 6:57:13 PM mlsmithca
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* The only Beatles original that was released in the UK neither as a single nor on an album is "I Call Your Name", the only original track on the ''Long Tall Sally'' EP from 1964.[[note]] The other tracks were covers; Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally", Larry Williams' "Slow Down", and Carl Perkins' "Matchbox" with a lead vocal by Ringo. "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name" were released as album tracks in the USA on ''The Beatles' Second Album'', while "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" made it onto ''Something New''.[[/note]] The song was originally recorded by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas and released as the B-side to "Bad to Me" (another Lennon-[=McCartney=] track), but John was unimpressed by their version and decided the Beatles should record it; the ska-influenced instrumental bridge is a particular highlight of the Fab Four's version.
14th May '17 2:35:00 PM mlsmithca
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* Side 1 of ''Abbey Road'' contains one classic from each of the four Beatles - the enigmatic "Come Together" by John, the sublime "Something" by George, the bluesy "Oh! Darling" by Paul, and the fun "Octopus' Garden" by Ringo. Meanwhile, in addition to the medley, Side 2 boasts George's infectiously optimistic "Here Comes the Sun" (play hookie from work, hang out in Eric Clapton's garden, write a sunshine and flowers ditty, and get covered by ''everybody'', ''forever'') and the outstanding triple-tracked three-part harmonies of "Because". (The remaining tracks, John's "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" and Paul's "Maxwell's Silver Hammer", are perhaps more divisive, but still have their fans.)

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* Side 1 of ''Abbey Road'' contains one classic from each of the four Beatles - the Beatles:
** The
enigmatic "Come Together" by John, John boasts mysterious lyrics about a man identified only as "Old Flat Top", with haunting acoustic guitar and drum accompaniment in the verses that suddenly becomes heavier and electric for the chorus, bridge, and fade-out just in time for the TitleDrop: "Come together, right now, over me!"
** The
sublime "Something" by George, George ranks as his masterpiece from the Beatles years; Creator/FrankSinatra may have goofed and described it as Lennon and [=McCartney's=] greatest love song, but the fact that he ranks it above the songs John and Paul actually ''did'' write speaks volumes. From the guitar hook at that opens the song and leads into each verse and the bridge to George's soulful rendition of the lyrics about that mysterious... ''something'' about his lover that so captivates him, "Something" is a timeless classic.
** The
bluesy "Oh! Darling" by Paul, Paul belies any notion that he just wrote silly love songs in the Beatles' later years, with his anguish-laden vocal performance and percussive piano lending a suitable level of gravitas to a song in which he pleads with his lover to re-consider her claim that she doesn't need him anymore. The chord progression in the bridge is especially inventive and effective.
** The
fun "Octopus' Garden" by Ringo. Meanwhile, in addition to Ringo is likewise ''his'' masterpiece as a Beatle, and while that may seem like damning with faint praise when one considers that he only received solo credit on one other Beatles song ("Don't Pass Me By" from the medley, White Album), the catchy tune, fascinating imagery of an undersea refuge from the travails of the surface world, and instrumental performances (including watery sound effects in the bridge) make for a real winner.
** The remaining songs on Side 1, Paul's "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" and John's "I Want You (She's So Heavy)", are more divisive, but still have their moments and their fans; highlights include the LyricalDissonance of a bouncy tune for lyrics about a serial killer and the hammer-on-anvil sound effects in the former, and the weighty guitar riff between the verses of the latter that leads not to a fade-out but to a swell-out that, by the end, sounds like the Beatles are playing in the middle of a hurricane.
*
Side 2 boasts George's infectiously optimistic "Here Comes the Sun" (play Sun". The recipe: play hookie from work, hang out in Eric Clapton's garden, write a sunshine and flowers ditty, and get covered by ''everybody'', ''forever'') ''forever''. The other Beatles' performances, especially Ringo on drums, just make things better.
* Whether or not John's "Because" really does come across as the triplet figure from the opening movement of Beethoven's ''Moonlight'' sonata played backwards, as John claimed was his inspiration, the rich vocal harmonies - three parts
and the outstanding triple-tracked three-part harmonies to create the sense of "Because". (The remaining tracks, John's a chorus of ''nine'' people singing - and haunting melody that seems to cut off in the middle of a phrase make this song, the last one on which the Beatles began work,[[note]] Not the last one they worked on; that would be "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" and Paul's "Maxwell's Silver Hammer", are perhaps more divisive, but still have Me Mine" from ''Let it Be''.[[/note]] one of their fans.)most memorable.
18th Apr '17 5:23:23 PM mlsmithca
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* "Let It Be" boasts a sublime vocal and keyboard performance by Paul, coupled with a brilliant guitar solo by George (whether in the single or the album version). It was the A-side to the final single released before Paul announced the band's impending dissolution, and although he wasn't exactly living by the sentiments of the song when it came to the infighting that had torn the group apart,[[note]] Though he was the last one to finally abandon any hope that the Beatles could continue as a group, he also never quite repaired his friendships with either John or George before their deaths.[[/note]] his "words of wisdom" provide such a fitting coda to the career of one of the most, if not ''the'' most, iconic and influential groups of the 20th century.

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* "Let It Be" boasts a sublime vocal and keyboard performance by Paul, coupled with a brilliant guitar solo by George (whether in the single or the album version). It was the A-side to the final single released in the UK before Paul announced the band's impending dissolution, and although he wasn't exactly living by the sentiments of the song when it came to the infighting that had torn the group apart,[[note]] Though he was the last one to finally abandon any hope that the Beatles could continue as a group, he also never quite repaired his friendships with either John or George before their deaths.[[/note]] his "words of wisdom" provide such a fitting coda to the career of one of the most, if not ''the'' most, iconic and influential groups of the 20th century.
18th Apr '17 5:21:36 PM mlsmithca
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* All of ''Abbey Road'' is Awesome Music. You have the individual works of four different musicians with differing styles all mixed into one album, that if you truly listen to it you can see it is all one song. "The End" just adds the final touch, as it fits its placement and usage. It is the last song on their last album, and it sums up the message they've been spreading their whole career, and all four Beatles have a solo. It is no wonder many consider it to be their greatest work.

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*
All of ''Abbey Road'' is Awesome Music. You have the individual works of four different musicians with differing styles all mixed into one album, that if you truly listen to it you can see it is all one song. "The End" just adds the final touch, as it fits its placement and usage. It is the last song on their last album, and it sums up the message they've been spreading their whole career, and all four Beatles have a solo. It is no wonder many consider it to be their greatest work.



* The medley on Side Two of ''Abbey Road'', starting with Paul's "You Never Give Me Your Money", easing into the Lennon-penned triptych of the laid-back "Sun King" and the acerbic "Mean Mr. Mustard" and "Polythene Pam", followed by the straightforward rock of Paul's "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window". After a short break (the only mid-medley "ending" as such), the medley turns to Paul's bittersweet "Golden Slumbers", then takes it up a notch at "Carry That Weight", which contains all four Beatles singing loudly in unison (with Ringo at the lead), then segues into a epic-sounding reprise of the first part of "You Never Give Me Your Money". The "You Never Give Me Your Money" ending riff leads this time into "The End", charged with a drum solo from Ringo, guitar solos from Paul, George, and John, and capped off with the simple line "And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make," flourished with a beautiful harmony of their voices and a last guitar tune. Knowing this was their final album as a band makes it all the more epic.

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* The medley on Side Two of ''Abbey Road'', Road'' is a masterpiece from start to finish, starting with Paul's "You Never Give Me Your Money", easing into the Lennon-penned triptych of the laid-back "Sun King" and the acerbic "Mean Mr. Mustard" and "Polythene Pam", followed by the straightforward rock of Paul's "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window". After a short break (the only mid-medley "ending" as such), the medley turns to Paul's bittersweet "Golden Slumbers", then takes it up a notch at "Carry That Weight", which contains all four Beatles singing loudly in unison (with Ringo at the lead), then segues into a epic-sounding reprise of the first part of "You Never Give Me Your Money". The "You Never Give Me Your Money" ending riff leads this time into "The End", charged with a drum solo from Ringo, guitar solos from Paul, George, and John, and capped off with the simple line "And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make," flourished with a beautiful harmony of their voices and a last guitar tune. Knowing this was their final album as a band makes it all the more epic.



* As fractious as the ''Let It Be'' sessions were, they still provided a few last gems that were crafted by both John and Paul, starting with the album opener, "Two of Us", the lyrics of which clearly draw from their long (though, by this time, disintegrating) friendship and the vocals of which emphasise the idea of shared experience by featuring two-part harmonies. And in a reverse trajectory compared to "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", the song started out as an energetic electric rocker that is well worth hearing.



* "Let It Be". A sublime vocal and keyboard performance by Paul, coupled with a brilliant guitar solo by George (whether in the single or the album version).

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* "Let It Be". A Be" boasts a sublime vocal and keyboard performance by Paul, coupled with a brilliant guitar solo by George (whether in the single or the album version).version). It was the A-side to the final single released before Paul announced the band's impending dissolution, and although he wasn't exactly living by the sentiments of the song when it came to the infighting that had torn the group apart,[[note]] Though he was the last one to finally abandon any hope that the Beatles could continue as a group, he also never quite repaired his friendships with either John or George before their deaths.[[/note]] his "words of wisdom" provide such a fitting coda to the career of one of the most, if not ''the'' most, iconic and influential groups of the 20th century.


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* Paul's heartfelt lead vocal and piano make the wistful "The Long and Winding Road" a real winner in any arrangement; if, like Macca himself, you don't care for the "wall of sound" string and vocal score Phil Spector dubbed over the top of the song, try the more simple and direct version from ''Let It Be... Naked'' or, if you can find a copy of the film, the version Paul performs just before he and the other three head to the rooftop.
17th Apr '17 10:25:47 AM mlsmithca
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* John's "Nowhere Man" stands out not just for the lyrics - the first by the Beatles not to explicitly address love between two people, but rather an attempt to reach a lonely man who lives in a world of his own (often interpreted to refer to John himself) - but for the rich, double-tracked three-part vocal harmonies in the verses.

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* John's "Nowhere Man" stands out not just for the lyrics - the first by the Beatles not to explicitly address love between two people, but rather an attempt to reach a lonely man who lives in a world of his own (often interpreted to refer to John himself) - but for the rich, double-tracked three-part vocal harmonies in the verses. The song also has a nice symmetry to it; after the first two verses, first bridge, instrumental break, and third verse and second bridge, the lads then backtrack lyrically through the second verse, first bridge, and first verse to finish where they began.



* "The Word" is the Beatles' first "love and peace anthem", and John's almost preacher-like lead vocal gives the song a suitable level of gravitas for its message about the liberating power of the word, "love", punctuated in the chorus by a harmonic clash between D major in the piano and D minor in the rhythm guitar and three-part vocal harmonies.



* With the WordSaladLyrics of "I Am the Walrus" having done nothing to stem the tide of academic overanalysis of his songs, John decided to go full MindScrew for "Glass Onion", a shining example of his acidic sense of humour that parades references to "Strawberry Fields Forever", "I Am the Walrus", "Lady Madonna", "The Fool on the Hill", and "Fixing a Hole" along with other surreal imagery to create a song that, rather than being about something, just... ''is''.



* "I Will" (which Paul wrote in India) is a heavily under-rated gem in the group's catalogue.

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* The strident tones of a harpsichord (played by producer Chris Thomas, George Martin having been on holiday) and double string quartet give George's darkly satirical "Piggies" just the right spiky edge it needs to deliver an ''Literature/AnimalFarm''-inspired attack on consumerist capitalism, ending with sarcastically jovial harmonies and grunting noises from John and Paul as well as George. The wry "What they need's a damn good whacking!" lyric from the end of the bridge is the only known contribution to the Beatles catalogue from George's mother, Louise Harrison.
* "I Will" (which Paul wrote in India) is a heavily under-rated gem in the group's catalogue. Like "Blackbird" from earlier on the album, it features little more than Paul's voice and acoustic guitar (with some light percussion from Ringo and John); even the bass is rendered vocally.


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* "Revolution 1" may be slower than the single version of the song, and sees John still uncertain about whether "you can count me out" or "in", but its lyrics about how violent revolution solves nothing remain some of his most iconic.
* George's acerbic sense of humour comes through again in his contribution to Side 4, "Savoy Truffle", ostensibly a poke at his friend Music/EricClapton's fondness for choccies and the damage they had done to his teeth, but also a knife through the syrup of some of Paul's more overly sentimental songs (its weighty electric organ and tenor and baritone sax score provides MoodWhiplash immediately after Paul's nostalgic love ballad "Honey Pie"), name-checking "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" in the final bridge.[[note]] Paul had insisted on so many takes of "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" to get it just right that the other Beatles were sick to death of it by the time it was finished.[[/note]]
17th Apr '17 12:51:50 AM mlsmithca
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* Paul's sensitive lead vocal and the acoustic guitars and bongos from John, George, and Ringo in the Beatles' cover of "Till There Was You" from ''Theatre/TheMusicMan'' provide early evidence of how versatile they were as musicians, just as capable at rendering slow ballads as fast rockers.



* The Beatles' meeting with Music/BobDylan didn't just provide an anecdote about Dylan's {{Mondegreen}} of "I get high, I get high, I get high" in the bridge of "I Want to Hold Your Hand"; it also inspired John to write more meaningful lyrics, starting with the lovestruck rocker "I Should Have Known Better", which also features a Dylan-esque harmonica riff (one of the Beatles' last songs to feature harmonica) and a memorable 12-string guitar solo from George.



** The bluesy guitar riff that opens "Baby's in Black" is a winner, coupled with the colour imagery of its refrain ("Oh dear, what can I do / Baby's in black and I'm feelin' blue / Tell me oh, what can I do") and the plaintive vocal performances.

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** The bluesy guitar riff that opens and recurs throughout "Baby's in Black" is a winner, coupled with the colour imagery of its refrain ("Oh dear, what can I do / Baby's in black and I'm feelin' blue / Tell me oh, what can I do") and the plaintive vocal performances.



* The FadeIn at the beginning of "Eight Days a Week". Although it does not quite fade in from total silence, it was still a bold move for its day. The rest of the song features more catchy vocal melodies from John and Paul.

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* The FadeIn at the beginning of "Eight Days a Week".Week" marks the song as a classic from the word "go". Although it does not quite fade in from total silence, it was still a bold move for its day. The rest of the song features more catchy vocal melodies from John and Paul.



* "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", with its heartfelt vocal performance by George and brilliant guitar solo by special guest Music/EricClapton.
* "Happiness Is a Warm Gun", which plays out like a medley of four or five shorter songs but in a way that makes the progression feel natural, and which has a great vocal track from John.

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* "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", with its heartfelt vocal performance by George and brilliant guitar solo by special guest Music/EricClapton.
Music/EricClapton, ranks as one of the quiet Beatle's outstanding songwriting achievements of the 1960s. And before Clapton was persuaded to perform an electric guitar solo, the song was an acoustic masterpiece with an even more angsty final verse that was ultimately dropped:
-->I look from the wings at the play you are staging[[note]] The version from the demo tapes recorded at George's house in Esher instead features the line "I look at the trouble and see that it's raging".[[/note]]\\
While my guitar gently weeps\\
As I'm sitting here doing nothing but ageing\\
Still my guitar gently weeps
* "Happiness Is a Warm Gun", which Gun" plays out like a medley of four or five shorter songs (the rhythm track alone took dozens of takes to get right as a result), ranging from the dreamlike "She's not a girl who misses much" and "She's well acquainted with the touch of the velvet hand" sections to the fuzz guitar-dominated, angry "I need a fix 'cause I'm goin' down" and "Mother Superior jump the gun" sections to the typical Lennon sarcasm of the TitleDrop section, but it's all done in a way that makes the progression feel natural, and which has a great John's vocal track from John.holds it all together brilliantly.



* The stuttering open to "I Want to Hold Your Hand", the third UK chart-topping true Lennon-[=McCartney=] collaboration in a row, as well as the catchy lyrics, tune, and vocal performances by John and Paul. No mystery why this became the group's first chart-topper in the USA. And turn the UK release of the single over, and you would find the beautiful three-part harmonies of the plaintive "This Boy".
* The feedback and guitar ostinato on "I Feel Fine", and also the upbeat lyrics, tune, and vocal harmonies.

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* The stuttering open to "I Want to Hold Your Hand", the third UK chart-topping true Lennon-[=McCartney=] collaboration in a row, as well as the catchy lyrics, tune, and vocal performances by John and Paul. No Paul, all leave no mystery as to why this became the group's first chart-topper in the USA. And turn the UK release of the single over, and you would find the beautiful three-part harmonies of the plaintive "This Boy".
Boy",[[note]] The American release featured "I Saw Her Standing There" on the B-side.[[/note]] which was memorably re-scored as an instrumental theme for Ringo's "parading" sequence in ''Film/AHardDaysNight''.
* The feedback and guitar ostinato on "I Feel Fine", and also Fine" meshes with the upbeat lyrics, tune, and vocal harmonies.harmonies to provide evidence that even when fighting burnout from a punishing touring and filming schedule, as they were when this single was recorded in late 1964, the lads could still produce some damn fine music. Flip the record over and you'll find a top notch B-side in the Little Richard-influenced "She's a Woman", boasting a throaty lead vocal from Paul and a punchy, syncopated rhythm guitar riff from John.



* Both sides of their late 1965 double A-side single: "Day Tripper", led by an awesome guitar ostinato from George and its sexuality-laden lyrics, and "We Can Work it Out", with a great lead vocal from Paul and optimistic lyrics about working out a couple's differences.
* Both sides of their early 1966 single: Paul's hard-rocking "Paperback Writer", anchored by another great guitar riff from George, some tight, crunchy drums from Ringo and humourously topped with falsetto choruses of "Frère Jacques" by John and George, and John's philosophical "Rain", slowed down from recording speed to give it an even more dreamlike atmosphere and featuring some of Ringo's best drumming, as well as the lads' first use of reversed tapes.

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* Both sides of their Their late 1965 double A-side single: single features back-to-back classics: "Day Tripper", led by an awesome guitar ostinato from George and its sexuality-laden lyrics, lyrics; and "We Can Work it Out", with a great lead vocal from Paul and optimistic lyrics about working out a couple's differences.
* Both sides
differences, as well as striking use of their a Salvation Army harmonium in the bridge and outro.
* Their
early 1966 single: single gave us two more classics: Paul's hard-rocking "Paperback Writer", anchored by another great guitar riff from George, some tight, crunchy drums from Ringo and humourously topped with falsetto choruses of "Frère Jacques" by John and George, George; and John's philosophical "Rain", slowed down from recording speed to give it an even more dreamlike atmosphere and featuring some of Ringo's best drumming, as well as the lads' first use of reversed tapes.
16th Apr '17 2:25:14 PM mlsmithca
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* The Smokey Robinson-inspired "Not a Second Time" may be somewhat infamous among Beatles fans as the song that inspired the "Aeolian cadences" overanalysis by ''The Times''[='=] William Mann, but there's no denying that its harmonic progressions are highly unusual and part of the song's appeal, as is the heavily echoed piano performance by George Martin.[[note]] The "Aeolian cadence" refers to the D7 chord resolving not to G, but to E minor during the song's TitleDrop - but only in the guitar, while the piano resolves instead to E ''major''. It wasn't just John Lennon who thought Mann was bonkers either; even professional musicologists have disputed his comparison of the song's harmonies to Gustav Mahler's ''Das Lied von der Erde''.[[/note]]

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* The Smokey Robinson-inspired "Not a Second Time" may be somewhat infamous among Beatles fans as the song that inspired the "Aeolian cadences" overanalysis by ''The Times''[='=] William Mann, but there's no denying that its harmonic progressions are highly unusual and part of the song's appeal, as is the heavily echoed piano performance by George Martin.[[note]] The "Aeolian cadence" refers to the D7 chord resolving not to G, but to E minor during the song's TitleDrop - but only in the guitar, while the piano resolves instead to E ''major''. It wasn't just John Lennon who thought Mann was bonkers either; even professional musicologists have disputed his comparison of the song's harmonies to the conclusion of Gustav Mahler's ''Das Lied von der Erde''.[[/note]]



* The high-energy and just plain fun "Can't Buy Me Love" accompanies one of the most iconic sequences in the film, a sequence to which almost every music video ever made owes an indirect debt of influence, but the song itself stands up very well on its own.

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* The high-energy and just plain fun "Can't Buy Me Love" accompanies one of the most iconic sequences in the film, a sequence to which almost every music video ever made owes an indirect debt of influence, but the song itself stands up very well on its own.own, almost serving as a counterpoint to the cover of "Money" that closed the previous album. "I don't care too much for money, money can't buy me love..."
16th Apr '17 2:00:27 AM mlsmithca
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* The album's non-soundtrack side also hits the ground running with the just plain fun rocker "Any Time at All", a more fast-paced version of the "If you need me, just call me" theme from "All I've Got to Do" from the previous album. The instrumental break in the middle of the song is a highlight.
* The haunting "reverse nostalgia" ballad "Things We Said Today" (written for, but not included in, the film) is one of Paul's early masterpieces. The more melancholy verses, in which the singer wonders if he and his lover will remember the "things [they] said today" years from now, contrast well with the more upbeat, major key bridge.
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