History AwesomeButImpractical / RealLife

20th Jul '16 6:03:47 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** At this point self-driving car technology has evolved to the point where they're extremely good at following traffic laws. In fact, sometimes they're TOO good, causing accidents because other drivers weren't driving properly and the smart car failed to react accordingly. Not to mention the ethical debate of weather nor not a self-driving car should be allowed to let its owner driver crash if doing so would prevent a much larger accident, as well as the legal complications about who's at fault for such an event.

to:

** At this point self-driving car technology has evolved to the point where they're extremely good at following traffic laws. In fact, sometimes they're TOO good, causing accidents because other drivers weren't driving properly and the smart car failed to react accordingly. Not to mention the ethical debate of weather whether nor not a self-driving car should be allowed to let its owner driver crash if doing so would prevent a much larger accident, as well as the legal complications about who's at fault for such an event.
20th Jul '16 5:59:43 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://magyarbusz.uw.hu/ikarus293.html Ikarus 293]] double articulated bus. While it had a high passenger count, it was too long, slow, and problems with turning making it unable to take corners in Budapest. Only one prototype was made. Later it was sold to Teheran after replacing the engine to a stronger one.

to:

* [[http://magyarbusz.uw.hu/ikarus293.html Ikarus 293]] double articulated bus. While it had a high passenger count, it was too long, slow, and problems with turning making it unable to take corners in Budapest. Only one prototype was made. Later it was sold to Teheran after replacing the engine to with a stronger one.one. Double articulated buses in general have seen some use[[labenote: example]]Hamburg - which has no light rail - uses double articulated buses as double decker buses would not fit under all bridges and Hamburg has ''a lot'' of bridges.[[/labelnote]], but they are mostly a more expensive and prone to failure way to do what buses towing a trailer, double decker buses or light rail vehicles can do much more reliably. And with both double decker buses and light rail there are benefits in terms of tourism (e.g. London double decker buses) or higher acceptance (many people who'd never take the bus have no problem taking rail based transit as study after study has shown).
20th Jul '16 4:50:44 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Sedans with standard trunks. Yes, they look awesome and provides large boot space to many Americans and Asians (particularly Chinese), but for Europeans, [[AmericansHateTingle it's impractical in terms of space.]]
** Funnily enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas, but often aren't practical for American drivers. This is mostly because, while American fuel economy standards are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the toughest in the world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Finally, Americans are pretty much the world's largest consumer of automobiles, spending much more time in their cars due to suburban sprawl and an inferior rail system to Europe, meaning that their standards for a good car, especially where comfort is concerned, are much higher than those of most Europeans. When you import European compacts to the United States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction.\\\

to:

* Sedans with standard trunks. Yes, they look awesome and provides large boot space to many Americans and Asians (particularly Chinese), but for Europeans, [[AmericansHateTingle it's impractical in terms of space.]]
]] Hatchbacks and station wagons provide greater rear cargo space for roughly the same amount of car, or the same amount of cargo room in a smaller package, a huge deal on a continent where space is often at a premium.
** Funnily enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas, but often aren't practical for American drivers. This is mostly because, while American fuel economy standards are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the toughest in the world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. (This is the reason why [[http://www.wsj.com/articles/los-angeles-sees-health-benefits-as-its-smog-haze-clears-1425506401 you rarely hear]] about UsefulNotes/LosAngeles' once-notorious smog anymore.) The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Finally, Americans are pretty much the world's largest consumer of automobiles, spending much more time in their cars due to suburban sprawl and an inferior rail system to Europe, meaning that their standards for a good car, especially where comfort is concerned, are much higher than those of most Europeans. When you import European compacts to the United States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction.\\\
13th Jul '16 5:14:41 AM Taxi-Pizzatime
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Wankel Rotary Engines have intriguing advantages. They can be weigh less than a piston engine for a given power output, are much more compact, can easily rev up to an exciting amount of revolutions per minute, and are very smooth with almost no negative vibrations.\\

to:

* Wankel Rotary Engines have intriguing advantages. They can be weigh less than a piston engine for a given power output, are much more compact, can easily rev up to an exciting amount of revolutions per minute, and are very smooth with almost no negative vibrations.\\
13th Jul '16 4:00:02 AM Angus_Old
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]].
** For those not keen on clicking links, the driver of the RR rolls over onto the car's side within the ''first ten seconds'' of the video.
** This stunt was done by fitting a 13" wheel to one side of the car and a 10" wheel and several hundred kilos of stage weights to the other, and in normal road trim the Reliant Robin was far more stable.

to:

* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]].
** For those not keen on clicking links, the driver of the RR rolls over onto the car's side within the ''first ten seconds'' of the video.
** This stunt was done by fitting a 13" wheel to one side of the car and a 10" wheel and several hundred kilos of stage weights to the other, and in normal road trim the Reliant Robin was far more stable.
unstable while going around corners.
12th Jul '16 8:50:05 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Wankel Rotary Engines have intriguing advantages. They can be weigh in at less than a piston engine for a given power output, they are much more compact, can easily rev up to an exciting amount of revolutions per minute, and are very smooth with almost no negative vibrations.\\

to:

* Wankel Rotary Engines have intriguing advantages. They can be weigh in at less than a piston engine for a given power output, they are much more compact, can easily rev up to an exciting amount of revolutions per minute, and are very smooth with almost no negative vibrations.\\



Sadly, Wankel engines (Mazda RX-8 and before) have history of significant drawbacks that made them unattractive for most auto makers to develop; only Mazda has a history of significant investment in the design. Wankles tend to suffer from inefficient combustion, leading to lousy fuel economy for such a small engine, as well as emission troubles. The Mazda-designs also burn a small dose of motor oil by design, to prevent the apex seals from wearing quickly.\\

to:

Sadly, Wankel engines (Mazda RX-8 and before) have a history of significant drawbacks that made them unattractive for most auto makers to develop; only Mazda has a history of significant investment in the design. Wankles Wankels tend to suffer from inefficient combustion, leading to lousy fuel economy for such a small engine, as well as emission troubles. The Mazda-designs also burn a small dose of motor oil by design, to prevent the apex seals from wearing quickly.\\



With emission regulations becoming stricter over time, Mazda Wankel Engine research tends to be low priority. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3uGJGzUYCI Engineering Explained]] on [[Website/YouTube YouTube]] has an explanation of the drawbacks.

to:

With emission regulations becoming stricter over time, Mazda Wankel Engine research tends to be low priority. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3uGJGzUYCI Engineering Explained]] on [[Website/YouTube YouTube]] has an explanation of the drawbacks.
12th Jul '16 8:48:13 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
Is there an issue? Send a Message


With emission regulations becoming stricter over time, Mazda Wankel Engine research tends to be low priority. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3uGJGzUYCI Engineering Explained]] on [[Website/YouTube]] has an explanation of the drawbacks.

to:

With emission regulations becoming stricter over time, Mazda Wankel Engine research tends to be low priority. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3uGJGzUYCI Engineering Explained]] on [[Website/YouTube]] [[Website/YouTube YouTube]] has an explanation of the drawbacks.
12th Jul '16 8:47:11 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Wankel Rotary Engines have intriguing advantages. They can be weigh in at less than a piston engine for a given power output, they are much more compact, can easily rev up to an exciting amount of revolutions per minute, and are very smooth with almost no negative vibrations.\\
\\
Sadly, Wankel engines (Mazda RX-8 and before) have history of significant drawbacks that made them unattractive for most auto makers to develop; only Mazda has a history of significant investment in the design. Wankles tend to suffer from inefficient combustion, leading to lousy fuel economy for such a small engine, as well as emission troubles. The Mazda-designs also burn a small dose of motor oil by design, to prevent the apex seals from wearing quickly.\\
\\
With emission regulations becoming stricter over time, Mazda Wankel Engine research tends to be low priority. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3uGJGzUYCI Engineering Explained]] on [[Website/YouTube]] has an explanation of the drawbacks.
8th Jul '16 1:23:06 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Considering that most commercially viable forms of nuclear energy only utilize the U235, which is about 0.7% percent of naturally occurring Uranium and the vast majority of the 99.3% U238 are rather expensive waste, technologies that do something useful with the U238 sound rather tempting. However, due to myriad political and economic factors none of those processes has found widespread adoption even though the technological details are mostly figured out. The same goes even more for Thorium, which is three times more common than Uranium, but has to be "bred" first to make useful fuel out of it making it prohibitively expensive at current Uranium prices.

to:

* Considering that most commercially viable forms of nuclear energy only utilize the U235, which is about 0.7% percent of naturally occurring Uranium and the vast majority of the 99.3% U238 are rather expensive waste,[[labelnote: nuclear Physics and economic background]]While U235 splits into several parts when hit by a neutron and releases neutrons fast enough to split further U235 in the process the neutrons released by splitting U238 can't split further U238. However, in any nuclear reactor a small amount of U238 is more or less by chance turned into usable isotopes of Plutonium which can either be used for nuclear bombs or fuel other types of nuclear reactor. For that, the Plutonium and leftover U235 would have to be separated from the waste, for which there are a grand total of two large scale factories in the world (trying to build one has cost more than one government reelection). Another option is modifying the process to produce more Plutonium which is done in so called "breeder" reactors. However, due to the fact that Plutonium is ''very'' poisonous and can be used for nuclear bombs there are understandable political hurdles to large scale Plutonium production. To add insult to injury at current Uranium prices neither breeder reactors nor "recycling" spent fuel are economically efficient[[/labelnote]] technologies that do something useful with the U238 sound rather tempting. However, due to myriad political and economic factors none of those processes has found widespread adoption even though the technological details are mostly figured out. The same goes even more for Thorium, which is three times more common than Uranium, but has to be "bred" first to make useful fuel out of it making it prohibitively expensive at current Uranium prices.
8th Jul '16 1:14:34 AM DavidDelony
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* As with collecting arcade boards mentioned above, collecting classic computers and game consoles can fall into this, with the need for storage space, power, TV/monitor connections, aging/failing hardware with few options for repair and so on. That's why emulation is so popular on modern systems.

to:

* As with collecting arcade boards mentioned above, collecting classic computers and game consoles can fall into this, with the need for storage space, power, TV/monitor connections, aging/failing hardware with few options for repair and so on.for someone who isn't a GadgeteerGenius. That's why emulation is so popular on modern systems.
This list shows the last 10 events of 647. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=AwesomeButImpractical.RealLife