History AwesomeButImpractical / RealLife

11th Feb '16 3:10:47 PM DoctorCooper
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* In the [[{{tennis}} tennis world]] in 2007, an exhibition match between [[{{Main/RogerFederer}} Roger Federer]] and Rafael Nadal called Battle Of The Surfaces was held. Federer vs. Nadal on a [[http://my.opera.com/ARA77/albums/slideshow/?album=256440&picture=3788323 half-grass, half-clay court]]. So awesome. So impractical.
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* In the [[{{tennis}} tennis world]] in 2007, an exhibition match between [[{{Main/RogerFederer}} Roger Federer]] Federer and Rafael Nadal called Battle Of The Surfaces was held. Federer vs. Nadal on a [[http://my.opera.com/ARA77/albums/slideshow/?album=256440&picture=3788323 half-grass, half-clay court]]. So awesome. So impractical.
9th Feb '16 11:28:54 PM DavidDelony
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* As with collecting arcade boards mentioned above, collecting classic computers and game consoles can fall into this, with the need for storage space, power, TV/monitor connections and so on.
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* As with collecting arcade boards mentioned above, collecting classic computers and game consoles can fall into this, with the need for storage space, power, TV/monitor connections connections, aging/failing hardware with few options for repair and so on.on. That's why emulation is so popular on modern systems.
9th Feb '16 11:27:48 PM DavidDelony
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* As with collecting arcade boards mentioned above, collecting classic computers and game consoles can fall into this, with the need for storage space, power, TV/monitor connections and so on.
9th Feb '16 11:36:06 AM PDL
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** On the other side of things, a few bulldog breeders have realized that the current breed-standard for bulldogs is unhealthy to the well-being of the bulldog so they're setting a new standard to make it more robust (and even looking like how the breed was in the 1800s).
9th Feb '16 11:15:59 AM PaddyMurphy
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In the UK it's a 'driving licence'. Considering this is talking about a British 'car', the British usage is appropriate.
* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle it's origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a drivers license), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]].
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* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle it's origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a drivers license), driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]].
4th Feb '16 6:14:22 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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The end result is a tiny hatchback that may have high gas millage, but strains to go much faster than highway speed (which it's gonna meet a lot more often in the US than in Europe), puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small, lacks many of the creature comforts that American drivers are accustomed to, and is a DeathTrap in the event that it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck. This is the reason why, with the exception of Volkswagen, European cars in the United States are almost exclusively either luxury/performance vehicles like Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Bentley, or niche brands like Mini and Fiat (which, in America, only sells its quirky 500 hatchback and the 124 Spider roadster as opposed to the rest of its European lineup[[note]]Though admittedly, part of this is because other vehicles are sold as Chryslers and Dodges in the US[[/note]]). The Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European microcars that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car also took nearly a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking, on top of some cost-cutting import deals, to even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market.
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The end result is a tiny hatchback that may have high gas millage, but strains to go much faster than highway speed (which it's gonna meet a lot more often in the US than in Europe), puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small, lacks many of the creature comforts that American drivers are accustomed to, and is a DeathTrap in the event that it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck. This is the reason why, with the exception of Volkswagen, European cars in the United States are almost exclusively either luxury/performance vehicles like Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Bentley, or niche brands like Mini and Fiat (which, in America, only sells its quirky 500 hatchback and the 124 Spider roadster as opposed to the rest of its European lineup[[note]]Though admittedly, part of this is because other vehicles are sold as Chryslers and Dodges in the US[[/note]]). The Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European microcars that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car also took nearly a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking, on top of some cost-cutting import deals, to even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market. The only hatchbacks that do well in the US are 'hot hatches' that also have performance to spare, and even then, they're a niche market that's most popular with urban buyers (who live and drive in conditions closer to those of European cities).
4th Feb '16 6:03:48 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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** Funnily enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas, but often aren't practical for American drivers. This is mostly because, while American fuel economy standards are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the toughest in the entire world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Add this to the fact that Americans are pretty much the world's largest consumer of cars, and thus, their standards for a good car are much higher than those of most Europeans. When you import European cars to the United States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction. Americans also spend more time in their cars with suburban sprawl and a much inferior rail system than Europe, so comfort is a huge factor as well.\\\ The end result is a tiny hatchback that may nominally have high gas millage, but strains to go much faster than highway speed and puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small, and in the event it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck, it's a DeathTrap. The Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European compacts that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car also took nearly a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking, on top of some cost-cutting import deals, to even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market.
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** Funnily enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas, but often aren't practical for American drivers. This is mostly because, while American fuel economy standards are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the toughest in the entire world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Add this to the fact that Finally, Americans are pretty much the world's largest consumer of cars, automobiles, spending much more time in their cars due to suburban sprawl and thus, an inferior rail system to Europe, meaning that their standards for a good car car, especially where comfort is concerned, are much higher than those of most Europeans. When you import European cars compacts to the United States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction. Americans also spend more time in their cars with suburban sprawl and a much inferior rail system than Europe, so comfort is a huge factor as well.construction.\\\ The end result is a tiny hatchback that may nominally have high gas millage, but strains to go much faster than highway speed and (which it's gonna meet a lot more often in the US than in Europe), puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small, lacks many of the creature comforts that American drivers are accustomed to, and is a DeathTrap in the event that it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck, it's a DeathTrap. truck. This is the reason why, with the exception of Volkswagen, European cars in the United States are almost exclusively either luxury/performance vehicles like Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Bentley, or niche brands like Mini and Fiat (which, in America, only sells its quirky 500 hatchback and the 124 Spider roadster as opposed to the rest of its European lineup[[note]]Though admittedly, part of this is because other vehicles are sold as Chryslers and Dodges in the US[[/note]]). The Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European compacts microcars that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car also took nearly a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking, on top of some cost-cutting import deals, to even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market.
3rd Feb '16 7:23:20 PM DavidDelony
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** Funnily enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas, but often aren't practical for American drivers. This is mostly because, while American fuel economy standards are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the toughest in the entire world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Add this to the fact that Americans are pretty much the world's largest consumer of cars, and thus, their standards for a good car are much higher than those of most Europeans. When you import European cars to the United States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction.\\\
to:
** Funnily enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas, but often aren't practical for American drivers. This is mostly because, while American fuel economy standards are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the toughest in the entire world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Add this to the fact that Americans are pretty much the world's largest consumer of cars, and thus, their standards for a good car are much higher than those of most Europeans. When you import European cars to the United States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction. Americans also spend more time in their cars with suburban sprawl and a much inferior rail system than Europe, so comfort is a huge factor as well.\\\
3rd Feb '16 11:05:07 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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** Funnily enough in the United States, nearly the inverse is true: European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas but often aren't practical in most ways. This is mostly because American standards for fuel efficiency in emissions are the highest in the entire world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. Add this to the fact that Americans are pretty much the world's highest consumer of cars and you get a functional standard for cars much much higher than most European domestic automobiles. When you import European cars to the United States they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction. The end result is a car that may nominally have high gas millage, but does absolutely horribly for something so small. The only exception to this rule is the Smart car, which had to have nearly ten years of intensive redesigns and tweaking to on top of some cost cutting import deals to actually become practical in the American market. *** On top of this there are the United States crash safety regulations. The Yugo, for all its AllegedCar flaws, was one of the few non-American/non-Japanese small cars that actually met the then-current American emmission and safety standards.
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** Funnily enough enough, in the United States, nearly the inverse is true: true. European micro-cars theoretically save a ton of space and gas gas, but often aren't practical in most ways. for American drivers. This is mostly because because, while American fuel economy standards for fuel efficiency in emissions are fairly lax, American ''emissions'' standards are some of the highest toughest in the entire world, a fact that many people tend to ignore. The fuel-sipping, yet highly polluting, diesel engines that power many of these Euro-compacts often have to be {{nerf}}ed into oblivion in order to pass inspection, as Volkswagen found out the hard way in 2015. Ditto for American crash safety standards; that "wasted" space in the back of a sedan is actually very useful for preventing injury to a car's occupants in the event that [[HummerDinger a three-ton mall-crawler]] slams into the back of it. Add this to the fact that Americans are pretty much the world's highest largest consumer of cars cars, and you get a functional standard thus, their standards for cars much a good car are much higher than those of most European domestic automobiles. Europeans. When you import European cars to the United States States, they become much more expensive, but still use relatively cheap engines and construction. construction.\\\ The end result is a car tiny hatchback that may nominally have high gas millage, but does absolutely horribly strains to go much faster than highway speed and puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small. small, and in the event it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck, it's a DeathTrap. The only exception to this rule is Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European compacts that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car, which had to have car also took nearly ten years a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking to tweaking, on top of some cost cutting cost-cutting import deals deals, to actually even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market. *** On top of this there are the United States crash safety regulations. The Yugo, for all its AllegedCar flaws, was one of the few non-American/non-Japanese small cars that actually met the then-current American emmission and safety standards.market.
2nd Feb '16 11:35:14 AM Taxi-Pizzatime
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Maritime is now along side Locomotive, due to how they both tend to be commercial vehicles.
[[folder:Automotive, Maritime & Aeronautics]] * Supertankers. They have reached their maximal practical size already in the late 1970s, and [[AwesomeMcCoolname Seawise Giant]], launched 1979, demonstrated [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawise_Giant with all her 450 m length and 657,000 tonnes displacement]] that building any larger is impractical. ''All'' the supertankers of her size [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_world%27s_longest_ships have been scrapped]], and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI-class_supertanker largest supertanker currently in service]] carries roughly ''half'' the tonnage of oil Seawise Giant did. * Isambard Kingdom Brunel's final project, the SS ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ss_great_eastern Great Eastern]]''. Being five times larger than the biggest ship that came before it, and remaining the biggest ship in history for 40 years, it was certainly pretty awesome. But 'practical' is not the word to use when such an insanely expensive ship, which has capacity for 4000 passengers, carries just over ''forty'' on its maiden voyage.
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[[folder:Automotive, Maritime [[folder:Automotive & Aeronautics]] * Supertankers. They have reached their maximal practical size already in the late 1970s, and [[AwesomeMcCoolname Seawise Giant]], launched 1979, demonstrated [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawise_Giant with all her 450 m length and 657,000 tonnes displacement]] that building any larger is impractical. ''All'' the supertankers of her size [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_world%27s_longest_ships have been scrapped]], and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI-class_supertanker largest supertanker currently in service]] carries roughly ''half'' the tonnage of oil Seawise Giant did. * Isambard Kingdom Brunel's final project, the SS ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ss_great_eastern Great Eastern]]''. Being five times larger than the biggest ship that came before it, and remaining the biggest ship in history for 40 years, it was certainly pretty awesome. But 'practical' is not the word to use when such an insanely expensive ship, which has capacity for 4000 passengers, carries just over ''forty'' on its maiden voyage.Aeronautics]]

[[folder: Locomotive]]
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[[folder: Locomotive]]Locomotive & Maritime]]

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[[folder: Locomotive]]* Supertankers. They have reached their maximal practical size already in the late 1970s, and [[AwesomeMcCoolname Seawise Giant]], launched 1979, demonstrated [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawise_Giant with all her 450 m length and 657,000 tonnes displacement]] that building any larger is impractical. ''All'' the supertankers of her size [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_world%27s_longest_ships have been scrapped]], and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI-class_supertanker largest supertanker currently in service]] carries roughly ''half'' the tonnage of oil Seawise Giant did. * Isambard Kingdom Brunel's final project, the SS ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ss_great_eastern Great Eastern]]''. Being five times larger than the biggest ship that came before it, and remaining the biggest ship in history for 40 years, it was certainly pretty awesome. But 'practical' is not the word to use when such an insanely expensive ship, which has capacity for 4000 passengers, carries just over ''forty'' on its maiden voyage.
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