History AwesomeButImpractical / RealLife

20th Jan '18 7:24:11 PM Shadeblade11
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* The automotive equivalent of the chopper is the lowrider, which is built around eye-catching aesthetics. Of course, the fancier your hydraulics and electronics, the more high-maintenance your ride becomes. Daily driving a lowrider is hell on the various components, especially the suspension. Indeed, many lowriders you see at car shows are just that -- show pieces.
* The Japanese equivalent is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bōsōzoku bosozoku]]'', meaning wildly customized and flashy automobiles and motorcycles - to the point they can be completely undriveable outside the main roads.

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* The automotive equivalent of the chopper is the lowrider, which is built around eye-catching aesthetics. Of course, the fancier your hydraulics and electronics, the more high-maintenance your ride becomes. Daily driving a lowrider is hell on the various components, especially the suspension. Indeed, many lowriders you see at car shows are just that -- show pieces.
showpieces.
* The Japanese equivalent is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bōsōzoku bosozoku]]'', meaning wildly customized and flashy automobiles and motorcycles - to the point they can be completely undriveable undrivable outside the main roads.



** Spoilers on a front-wheel drive car are particularly stupid - getting enough downforce to activate the spoiler would actually ''reduce'' performance by pulling the drive axle off the ground.
* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel (used for steering) was in the front, along with the engine, making it both nose-heavy and unstable. It was alarmingly prone to wobbling when going around corners, or making any sudden, sharp turn.

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** Spoilers on a front-wheel drive front-wheel-drive car are particularly stupid - getting enough downforce to activate the spoiler would actually ''reduce'' performance by pulling the drive axle off the ground.
* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled three-wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, lightweight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel (used for steering) was in the front, along with the engine, making it both nose-heavy and unstable. It was alarmingly prone to wobbling when going around corners, or making any sudden, sharp turn.



The end result is a tiny hatchback that may have high gas millage, but strains to go much faster than highway speed (which it's gonna meet a lot more often in the US than in Europe), puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small, lacks many of the creature comforts that American drivers are accustomed to, and is a DeathTrap in the event that it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck. This is the reason why, with the exception of Volkswagen, European cars in the United States are almost exclusively either luxury/performance vehicles like Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Bentley, or niche brands like Mini and Fiat (which, in America, only sells its quirky 500 hatchback and the 124 Spider roadster as opposed to the rest of its European lineup[[note]]Though admittedly, part of this is because other vehicles are [[MarketBasedTitle sold as Chryslers and Dodges]] in the US[[/note]]). The Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European microcars that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car also took nearly a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking, on top of some cost-cutting import deals, to even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market. The only hatchbacks that do well in the US are 'hot hatches' that also have performance to spare, and even then, they're a niche market that's most popular with urban buyers (who live and drive in conditions closer to those of European cities).

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The end result is a tiny hatchback that may have high gas millage, mileage, but strains to go much faster than highway speed (which it's gonna meet a lot more often in the US than in Europe), puts out stunningly noxious emissions for something so small, lacks many of the creature comforts that American drivers are accustomed to, and is a DeathTrap in the event that it gets into a high-speed tangle with the average American truck. This is the reason why, with the exception of Volkswagen, European cars in the United States are almost exclusively either luxury/performance vehicles like Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Bentley, or niche brands like Mini and Fiat (which, in America, only sells its quirky 500 hatchback and the 124 Spider roadster as opposed to the rest of its European lineup[[note]]Though admittedly, part of this is because other vehicles are [[MarketBasedTitle sold as Chryslers and Dodges]] in the US[[/note]]). The Yugo, for all its [[TheAllegedCar flaws]], was one of the few European microcars that actually met the American emissions and safety standards of the time. The Smart car also took nearly a decade of intensive redesigns and tweaking, on top of some cost-cutting import deals, to even become ''street-legal'' in the US, let alone practical in the American market. The only hatchbacks that do well in the US are 'hot hatches' that also have performance to spare, and even then, they're a niche market that's most popular with urban buyers (who live and drive in conditions closer to those of European cities).



* [[http://magyarbusz.uw.hu/ikarus293.html Ikarus 293]] double articulated bus. While it had a high passenger count, it was too long, slow, and problems with turning making it unable to take corners in Budapest. Only one prototype was made. Later it was sold to Teheran after replacing the engine with a stronger one. Double articulated buses in general have seen some use[[labelnote: example]]Hamburg - which has no light rail - uses double articulated buses as double decker buses would not fit under all bridges and Hamburg has ''a lot'' of bridges.[[/labelnote]], but they are mostly a more expensive and prone to failure way to do what buses towing a trailer, double decker buses or light rail vehicles can do much more reliably. And with both double decker buses and light rail there are benefits in terms of tourism (e.g. London double decker buses) or higher acceptance (many people who'd never take the bus have no problem taking rail based transit as study after study has shown).

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* [[http://magyarbusz.uw.hu/ikarus293.html Ikarus 293]] double articulated bus. While it had a high passenger count, it was too long, slow, and problems with turning making it unable to take corners in Budapest. Only one prototype was made. Later it was sold to Teheran after replacing the engine with a stronger one. Double articulated buses buses, in general general, have seen some use[[labelnote: example]]Hamburg - which has no light rail - uses double articulated buses as double decker double-decker buses would not fit under all bridges and Hamburg has ''a lot'' of bridges.[[/labelnote]], but they are mostly a more expensive and prone to failure way to do what buses towing a trailer, double decker double-decker buses or light rail vehicles can do much more reliably. And with both double decker double-decker buses and light rail there are benefits in terms of tourism (e.g. London double decker double-decker buses) or higher acceptance (many people who'd never take the bus have no problem taking rail based rail-based transit as study after study has shown).



In the final season of mythbusters, they revisited the drifting vs regular cornering. While the final result is that both "always drift" and "always normal cornering" have more or less the same time, they noticed on certain corners, normal cornering is faster while some are faster when drifting. Long story short, drifting is situational.\\

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In the final season of mythbusters, Mythbusters, they revisited the drifting vs regular cornering. While the final result is that both "always drift" and "always normal cornering" have more or less the same time, they noticed on certain corners, normal cornering is faster while some are faster when drifting. Long story short, drifting is situational.\\



** At this point self-driving car technology has evolved to the point where they're extremely good at following traffic laws. In fact, sometimes they're TOO good, causing accidents because other drivers weren't driving properly and the smart car failed to react accordingly. Not to mention the ethical debate of whether nor not a self-driving car should be allowed to let its owner driver crash if doing so would prevent a much larger accident, as well as the legal complications about who's at fault for such an event.

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** At this point self-driving car technology has evolved to the point where they're extremely good at following traffic laws. In fact, sometimes they're TOO good, causing accidents because other drivers weren't driving properly and the smart car failed to react accordingly. Not to mention the ethical debate of whether nor or not a self-driving car should be allowed to let its owner driver crash if doing so would prevent a much larger accident, as well as the legal complications about who's at fault for such an event.



Sadly, Wankel engines (Mazda RX-8 and before) have a history of significant drawbacks that made them unattractive for most auto makers to develop; only Mazda has a history of significant investment in the design. Wankels tend to suffer from inefficient combustion, leading to lousy fuel economy for such a small engine, as well as emission troubles. The Mazda-designs also burn a small dose of motor oil by design, to prevent the apex seals from wearing quickly.\\

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Sadly, Wankel engines (Mazda RX-8 and before) have a history of significant drawbacks that made them unattractive for most auto makers automakers to develop; only Mazda has a history of significant investment in the design. Wankels tend to suffer from inefficient combustion, leading to lousy fuel economy for such a small engine, as well as emission troubles. The Mazda-designs also burn a small dose of motor oil by design, to prevent the apex seals from wearing quickly.\\



* So weird that it cries for its own entry, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz_600 the Mercedes-Benz 600 (W100)]]. While awesomely luxurious and built like [[TankGoodness a Tiger tank]], it had one ''small'' fault: ''not a single part or technology on it was interchangeable with any other Mercedes-Benz model, past or future''. None. The custom model to end all custom models. The hydraulic switch driving the 4 windows? Good luck finding it from old factory stock, and even if you can, they ask God-damned [[CrackIsCheaper $11,200 for it]]. As of 2011. No figures available for present day. Other switches and valves are thought to be [[BlatantLies "reasonably priced"]] if they fall into $1000-2000 range. It needs a specific hydraulic oil, custom parts which are hand fitted and sometimes incompatible between cars of the same year, a specific tool kit to be able to work on it. [[SarcasmMode It may be sometimes needed to build from scratch the old factory which made it in]] [[TheSixties the 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies 1970s]] [[SarcasmMode only to keep them running]].

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* So weird that it cries for its own entry, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz_600 the Mercedes-Benz 600 (W100)]]. While awesomely luxurious and built like [[TankGoodness a Tiger tank]], it had one ''small'' fault: ''not a single part or technology on it was interchangeable with any other Mercedes-Benz model, past or future''. None. The custom model to end all custom models. The hydraulic switch driving the 4 windows? Good luck finding it from old factory stock, and even if you can, they ask God-damned [[CrackIsCheaper $11,200 for it]]. As of 2011. No figures available for present day. Other switches and valves are thought to be [[BlatantLies "reasonably priced"]] if they fall into $1000-2000 range. It needs a specific hydraulic oil, custom parts which are hand fitted and sometimes incompatible between cars of the same year, a specific tool kit toolkit to be able to work on it. [[SarcasmMode It may be sometimes needed to build from scratch the old factory which made it in]] [[TheSixties the 1960s]] and [[TheSeventies 1970s]] [[SarcasmMode only to keep them running]].



* Shopping at high-end kitchen gadget shops can be this, due to the severe mark-up in prices that can occur. Often, you can find the same or similar tools and appliances at discount department stores and internet retailers for greatly reduced cost, and the build quality need not be worse.

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* Shopping at high-end kitchen gadget shops can be this, due to the severe mark-up markup in prices that can occur. Often, you can find the same or similar tools and appliances at discount department stores and internet retailers for greatly reduced cost, and the build quality need not be worse.



Even more expensive is running up to [[UpToEleven four video cards]] like with Nvidia SLI & AMD Crossfire. Sure, you can harness immense graphical processing power, but when the video cards can't handle the latest games, you now have to [[CrackIsCheaper replace 2-4 video cards]] if you want to continue reaping the benefits. The expense of the reqired motherboard is also increased, and the main CPU will become obsolete someday too. Using a multi-core graphics card for a reasonable expense can provide a similar benefit for significant money savings.

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Even more expensive is running up to [[UpToEleven four video cards]] like with Nvidia SLI & AMD Crossfire. Sure, you can harness immense graphical processing power, but when the video cards can't handle the latest games, you now have to [[CrackIsCheaper replace 2-4 video cards]] if you want to continue reaping the benefits. The expense of the reqired required motherboard is also increased, and the main CPU will become obsolete someday too. Using a multi-core graphics card for a reasonable expense can provide a similar benefit for significant money savings.



A miniature desktop box can be a much more cost effective, allowing a degree of portability (provided the destination has peripherals set up), and you can still upgrade the video card when needed. Homebrew projects exist that can install a desktop machine and monitor into a briefcase for a desktop on the go, and these ''can'' be upgraded with ease, right down to the motherboard.

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A miniature desktop box can be a much more cost effective, cost-effective, allowing a degree of portability (provided the destination has peripherals set up), and you can still upgrade the video card when needed. Homebrew projects exist that can install a desktop machine and monitor into a briefcase for a desktop on the go, and these ''can'' be upgraded with ease, right down to the motherboard.



* "DVD quality" audio, which is spec'd at 24-bits per sample at rate of 192KHz. Compared to the CD which is 16-bits per sample at a rate of 44.1KHz. If you compared the audio signal of DVD quality vs. CD quality audio, DVD quality would look very much like [[http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/dvd-audio.gif a perfect sine wave]] in digital form. Unfortunately, due to the limitations of the human ear, most people can't tell the difference and the few that do probably have to seriously focus. Not to mention DVD audio takes up roughly ''6.5 times the space'' compared to uncompressed CD audio.

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* "DVD quality" audio, which is spec'd at 24-bits per sample at rate of 192KHz. Compared to the CD which is 16-bits per sample at a rate of 44.1KHz. If you compared the audio signal of DVD quality vs. CD quality CD-quality audio, DVD quality would look very much like [[http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/dvd-audio.gif a perfect sine wave]] in digital form. Unfortunately, due to the limitations of the human ear, most people can't tell the difference and the few that do probably have to seriously focus. Not to mention DVD audio takes up roughly ''6.5 times the space'' compared to uncompressed CD audio.



* Basically, the whole point. The clothing and makeup of the wealthy and noble (or, in slaver societies, simply of free people) is often designed specifically to say "Look, I can afford wasting hours preparing or being prepared by servants. Look, I don't need to work, which would be impossible like that. Look, I don't need to indulge in any activity which may dirty up and ruin all this work spent."

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* Basically, the whole point. The clothing and makeup of the wealthy and noble (or, in slaver societies, simply of free people) is are often designed specifically to say "Look, I can afford wasting hours preparing or being prepared by servants. Look, I don't need to work, which would be impossible like that. Look, I don't need to indulge in any activity which may dirty up and ruin all this work spent."



* Traditional female clothing in Norway, [[http://www.nb.no/cgi-bin/galnor/gn_sok.sh?id=69110&skjema=2&fm=4 like what this Hallingdal woman is wearing]], dressed up for church. The head gear had to be put on with special care, and the whole set took an hour to finish. The last generation to use this regularly died out some time around 1980, and younger girls in this particular area switched to a more practical bonnet when dressing up. Nonetheless, this particular way of stashing was common in this area for ''300 years''.
* Cosplays with elaborate armor, props, wings, and the like are no doubt the result of hundreds of hours of dedication and hard work, and look excellent for photoshoots and for simply showing off. However, many of these cosplays can be uncomfortable to walk around a convention center in--just ask anyone who has tried to walk around in a 10-foot-tall cosplay of [[Franchise/NeonGenesisEvangelion EVA-01]] or the complete outfit and armaments of one of the ''VideoGame/KantaiCollection'' ship girls and they will tell you that strolling around the convention grounds without accidentally hitting people with their cosplay or wearing themselves out (depending on the weight of the materials and how warm the outfit is) is no easy task. Usually, people who output these kinds of grandiose cosplays will put them on for a photoshoot and then either remove the parts that inhibit mobility or change into something else to wear entirely when they want to walk around the event venue afterwards.

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* Traditional female clothing in Norway, [[http://www.nb.no/cgi-bin/galnor/gn_sok.sh?id=69110&skjema=2&fm=4 like what this Hallingdal woman is wearing]], dressed up for church. The head gear headgear had to be put on with special care, and the whole set took an hour to finish. The last generation to use this regularly died out some time sometime around 1980, and younger girls in this particular area switched to a more practical bonnet when dressing up. Nonetheless, this particular way of stashing was common in this area for ''300 years''.
* Cosplays with elaborate armor, props, wings, and the like are no doubt the result of hundreds of hours of dedication and hard work, work and look excellent for photoshoots photo shoots and for simply showing off. However, many of these cosplays can be uncomfortable to walk around a convention center in--just ask anyone who has tried to walk around in a 10-foot-tall cosplay of [[Franchise/NeonGenesisEvangelion EVA-01]] or the complete outfit and armaments of one of the ''VideoGame/KantaiCollection'' ship girls and they will tell you that strolling around the convention grounds without accidentally hitting people with their cosplay or wearing themselves out (depending on the weight of the materials and how warm the outfit is) is no easy task. Usually, people who output these kinds of grandiose cosplays will put them on for a photoshoot and then either remove the parts that inhibit mobility or change into something else to wear entirely when they want to walk around the event venue afterwards.



** Same goes for the dresses and gowns many starlets wear on the Red Carpet. They ''tend'' to be beautiful, but they cost an inordinate amount of money for something ''she's only going to wear once''. Notable pop star Music/LadyGaga seems to be [[StealthInsult parodying]] this, as some of her outfits are ''really'' out there [[MemeticMutation (the meatdress, anyone?)]] but, as her first performance on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' shows, she has some difficulty ''sitting'' in them to play the piano.

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** Same goes for the dresses and gowns many starlets wear on the Red Carpet. They ''tend'' to be beautiful, but they cost an inordinate amount of money for something ''she's only going to wear once''. Notable pop star Music/LadyGaga seems to be [[StealthInsult parodying]] this, as some of her outfits are ''really'' out there [[MemeticMutation (the meatdress, meat dress, anyone?)]] but, as her first performance on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' shows, she has some difficulty ''sitting'' in them to play the piano.



* A classic Japanese kimono is a clothing of an idle nobleman, plain and simple, and this is most evident in the formal women fashion with its straight and narrow silouette, which looks stunning, but forces its wearer into a painfully straight posture and barelly allows walking. Men's formal wear when in presense of a Shogun or Emperor also included an extremely long pleated trousers, called ''naga-bakama'', which were often 2-3 meters long and were ''specifically'' designed to restrict movement for increased safety of a visited dignitary, as they make a sudden attack impossible. Serving or working men and women wore shorter, knee-length or mid-thigh kimonos, often with narrow pantaloons called ''zubon'' for commoners, or wide, pleated ''hakama'' for upper classes and certain trades, and in hotter weather simply a ''fundoshi'' loincloth, all of which allowed for a much better freedom of movement.

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* A classic Japanese kimono is a clothing of an idle nobleman, plain and simple, and this is most evident in the formal women fashion with its straight and narrow silouette, silhouette, which looks stunning, but forces its wearer into a painfully straight posture and barelly barely allows walking. Men's formal wear when in presense presence of a Shogun or Emperor also included an extremely long pleated trousers, called ''naga-bakama'', which were often 2-3 meters long and were ''specifically'' designed to restrict movement for increased safety of a visited dignitary, as they make a sudden attack impossible. Serving or working men and women wore shorter, knee-length or mid-thigh kimonos, often with narrow pantaloons called ''zubon'' for commoners, or wide, pleated ''hakama'' for upper classes and certain trades, and in hotter weather simply a ''fundoshi'' loincloth, all of which allowed for a much better freedom of movement.



* 'Lightscribe' (and its rival [=LabelFlash=]) is a technology that allows you to 'print' high quality labels onto optical disks such as [=CDs=], [=DVDs=] and Blu-Rays. The process doesn't require paper, ink, or anything else beyond a special type of drive that costs only a couple of bucks more than a regular drive and special disks that cost only a tiny bit more than regular disks. After you've burned your data, you flip the disk over in your drive and 'burn' the label that you've designed in an easy-to-use labelling program; after a few minutes, a high-quality, high DPI label is embedded into the 'label side' of the disk surface. Unfortunately, it takes about 15 minutes to 'burn' a Lightscribe label, and it takes multiple repeated 'burns' to get an image of satisfactory contrast. You might have a Lightscribe capable drive and not ever know it, because simple permanent markers are just ''faster''.

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* 'Lightscribe' (and its rival [=LabelFlash=]) is a technology that allows you to 'print' high quality high-quality labels onto optical disks such as [=CDs=], [=DVDs=] and Blu-Rays. The process doesn't require paper, ink, or anything else beyond a special type of drive that costs only a couple of bucks more than a regular drive and special disks that cost only a tiny bit more than regular disks. After you've burned your data, you flip the disk over in your drive and 'burn' the label that you've designed in an easy-to-use labelling program; after a few minutes, a high-quality, high DPI label is embedded into the 'label side' of the disk surface. Unfortunately, it takes about 15 minutes to 'burn' a Lightscribe label, and it takes multiple repeated 'burns' to get an image of satisfactory contrast. You might have a Lightscribe capable drive and not ever know it, because simple permanent markers are just ''faster''.



** [=CD/MP3=] players were cheap and had significant storage capacity, but they were often difficult to use on the go (anti-skip technology mitigated, but never entirely eliminated, the problem) and preparing their media was a massive hassle. Want to change one track in your 700MB, 160-track CD? Gotta buy a new one. Ah, but you foresaw this and burned it on a rewritable! Nope, gotta buy a new one anyway, because the wear-and-tear of portable use scratched the CD-RW to hell and now your burner doesn't want to know about it. And burners of the time were painfully slow, too - writing 700MB at 4x speed was a half-hour affair.
** Hard-disk players had rapid interfaces, no skipping problems and you could effortlessly change their content as you saw fit - and for the time they held a ''massive'' amount of music. Unfortunately they were eye-wateringly expensive, often had questionable battery life and were frightfully delicate - if you dropped one even a short distance while the disk was spinning you were almost guaranteed to end up with a brick. Often the drive would die after some use even in players that weren't dropped, because no hard disk likes being jostled around in a pocket.

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** [=CD/MP3=] players were cheap and had significant storage capacity, but they were often difficult to use on the go (anti-skip technology mitigated, but never entirely eliminated, the problem) and preparing their media was a massive hassle. Want to change one track in on your 700MB, 160-track CD? Gotta buy a new one. Ah, but you foresaw this and burned it on a rewritable! Nope, gotta buy a new one anyway, because the wear-and-tear of portable use scratched the CD-RW to hell and now your burner doesn't want to know about it. And burners of the time were painfully slow, too - writing 700MB at 4x speed was a half-hour affair.
** Hard-disk players had rapid interfaces, no skipping problems and you could effortlessly change their content as you saw fit - and for the time they held a ''massive'' amount of music. Unfortunately Unfortunately, they were eye-wateringly expensive, often had questionable battery life and were frightfully delicate - if you dropped one even a short distance while the disk was spinning you were almost guaranteed to end up with a brick. Often the drive would die after some use even in players that weren't dropped, dropped because no hard disk likes being jostled around in a pocket.



* dbx emerged as a competitor to Dolby noise reduction for consumer audio tapes, but was hampered by the fact that while Dolby recordings were perfectly listenable without decoding equipment, dbx recordings were unlistenable despite higher sound quality than Dolby with properly-equipped recorders.

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* dbx emerged as a competitor to Dolby noise reduction for consumer audio tapes, tapes but was hampered by the fact that while Dolby recordings were perfectly listenable without decoding equipment, dbx recordings were unlistenable despite higher sound quality than Dolby with properly-equipped recorders.



* Theoretically, anti-matter would be an incredible fuel, with every gram allowing for prodigious amounts of energy - making possible things such as far-space travel, or tiny powerplants that could energize entire countries. Only problem is, anti-matter is astronomically expensive (62 ''trillion'' dollars per gram) and slow to produce (to the point we've only ever managed to make a few hundred atoms), very complex to contain (a momentary containment failure of a significant quantity could result in explosions such as the human race has never yet seen) and has bad shelf life (varying from a few seconds to a few minutes).

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* Theoretically, anti-matter would be an incredible fuel, with every gram allowing for prodigious amounts of energy - making possible things such as far-space travel, or tiny powerplants power plants that could energize entire countries. Only The only problem is, anti-matter is astronomically expensive (62 ''trillion'' dollars per gram) and slow to produce (to the point we've only ever managed to make a few hundred atoms), very complex to contain (a momentary containment failure of a significant quantity could result in explosions such as the human race has never yet seen) and has bad shelf life (varying from a few seconds to a few minutes).



* The Manned Space Program. There is very little for scientific pursuits that a manned mission can do that can't be accomplished by an ummanned vehicle for a fraction of the cost (other than things like measuring human performance in space, where a human is part of the question). [[RuleOfCool But it's too cool to resist.]]
** In particular, colonies on the Moon or Mars. Getting people and some buildings over there, hard as it is, is only a one-time effort. Then there's the ongoing resupply of food, medicine, and anything else they can not produce, without which the colonists will die. A lot of the R&D toward space colonies goes toward making them able to produce their own necessities, and something else that can't be had more cheaply on Earth to pay for what still needs to be imported (such as computer chips), as well as for more colonists. (This is one reason why [[AsteroidMiners space stations mining asteroids moved into Earth orbit]] has been proposed before colonizing either the Moon or Mars.)

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* The Manned Space Program. There is very little for scientific pursuits that a manned mission can do that can't be accomplished by an ummanned unmanned vehicle for a fraction of the cost (other than things like measuring human performance in space, where a human is part of the question). [[RuleOfCool But it's too cool to resist.]]
** In particular, colonies on the Moon or Mars. Getting people and some buildings over there, hard as it is, is only a one-time effort. Then there's the ongoing resupply of food, medicine, and anything else they can not produce, without which the colonists will die. A lot of the R&D toward space colonies goes toward making them able to produce their own necessities, necessities and something else that can't be had more cheaply on Earth to pay for what still needs to be imported (such as computer chips), as well as for more colonists. (This is one reason why [[AsteroidMiners space stations mining asteroids moved into Earth orbit]] has been proposed before colonizing either the Moon or Mars.)



* The concept of a SpaceElevator sounds cool: Bringing materials and people up to orbital altitudes without needing fuel-burning rockets. However, many issues prevent the concept from working in practice, the threat of meteors and satellites colliding with the elevator cable being an obvious concern. As mentioned above though, most new technologies start out impractical and require ''a lot'' of work to bring into the realm of feasibility, space tethers are far from even the proto-type stage.
* Back during the Cold War and the Space Race the USA got the Saturn V rocket working, and the USSR wanted something better. Enter the N1, a massive five-stage rocket intended for launching space stations and other large cargo. It was properly huge and employed the novel concept of a cluster of smaller engines instead of the traditional four or five big ones. This gave it a significantly higher thrust than its American counterpart... in theory. In practice the higher thrust didn't actually give it a better lifting capacity, and the engine cluster required complicated plumbing that was never able to withstand the forces and vibration of launch without exploding the whole damn thing to bits. The second launch crashed back on the pad and caused one of the most powerful non-nuclear explosions ''ever'' recorded; though that probably qualifies as awesome in the traditional sense of the word, it wasn't exactly what the Soviet engineers had in mind.

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* The concept of a SpaceElevator sounds cool: Bringing materials and people up to orbital altitudes without needing fuel-burning rockets. However, many issues prevent the concept from working in practice, the threat of meteors and satellites colliding with the elevator cable being an obvious concern. As mentioned above though, most new technologies start out impractical and require ''a lot'' of work to bring into the realm of feasibility, space tethers are far from even the proto-type prototype stage.
* Back during the Cold War and the Space Race the USA got the Saturn V rocket working, and the USSR wanted something better. Enter the N1, a massive five-stage rocket intended for launching space stations and other large cargo. It was properly huge and employed the novel concept of a cluster of smaller engines instead of the traditional four or five big ones. This gave it a significantly higher thrust than its American counterpart... in theory. In practice practice, the higher thrust didn't actually give it a better lifting capacity, and the engine cluster required complicated plumbing that was never able to withstand the forces and vibration of launch without exploding the whole damn thing to bits. The second launch crashed back on the pad and caused one of the most powerful non-nuclear explosions ''ever'' recorded; though that probably qualifies as awesome in the traditional sense of the word, it wasn't exactly what the Soviet engineers had in mind.



** The first stage rocket engines used by the Saturn V had a different problem. They were actually a bit too powerful for 1960s technology to completely handle. (Let's put a human sized handle on this: Sure the engines each delivered around 1.5 million pounds of thrust, but who can grasp that? Instead, try this: Each had a rocket-fuel driven turbopump to pump fuel and oxidizer to the main engine. Those turbopumps produced roughly 55,000 horsepower. Each. Just to pump the gas.) NASA had a large enough budget to work around this problem and completely redesign the Apollo spacecraft after the Apollo 1 fire that killed 3 astronauts. The center engine of a Saturn V was programmed to automatically shut down before the end of the 1st stage burn when the acceleration rate passed a certain point or when pogo oscillations were detected. Both of those could destroy a Saturn V during launch. The Saturn V was designed so that it could lose a first stage engine part way through the climb to orbit (which did happen twice) and still make it to the moon and back.

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** The first stage rocket engines used by the Saturn V had a different problem. They were actually a bit too powerful for 1960s technology to completely handle. (Let's put a human sized human-sized handle on this: Sure the engines each delivered around 1.5 million pounds of thrust, but who can grasp that? Instead, try this: Each had a rocket-fuel driven turbopump to pump fuel and oxidizer to the main engine. Those turbopumps produced roughly 55,000 horsepower. Each. Just to pump the gas.) NASA had a large enough budget to work around this problem and completely redesign the Apollo spacecraft after the Apollo 1 fire that killed 3 astronauts. The center engine of a Saturn V was programmed to automatically shut down before the end of the 1st stage burn when the acceleration rate passed a certain point or when pogo oscillations were detected. Both of those could destroy a Saturn V during launch. The Saturn V was designed so that it could lose a first stage engine part way through the climb to orbit (which did happen twice) and still make it to the moon and back.



* Project Gnome was the first technologically possible design of a fusion power plant. Notice we didn't say fusion reactor. Gnome worked by exploding hydrogen bombs in large underground spaces (created appropriately enough by also exploding hydrogen bombs) and then using the gasses from the explosion to power a turbine. As a side business, the process contains almost all the nuclear fallout in an easy to harvest form, which can then be sold to satisfy the demands for exotic isotopes while un-reacted fissile isotopes can be made into more hydrogen bombs. As crazy as the concept sounds the most impracticable thing wasn't that it needed to H-bombs for fuel and actually didn't have a significant environmental impact. Instead the impracticality came from the fact that it generated enormous amounts of power in seconds and its economically unfeasible to store power on an industrial scale and setting up enough of these things so that one would constantly go off every few seconds was just not logistically possible.

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* Project Gnome was the first technologically possible design of a fusion power plant. Notice we didn't say fusion reactor. Gnome worked by exploding hydrogen bombs in large underground spaces (created appropriately enough by also exploding hydrogen bombs) and then using the gasses from the explosion to power a turbine. As a side business, the process contains almost all the nuclear fallout in an easy to harvest form, which can then be sold to satisfy the demands for exotic isotopes while un-reacted fissile isotopes can be made into more hydrogen bombs. As crazy as the concept sounds the most impracticable thing wasn't that it needed to H-bombs for fuel and actually didn't have a significant environmental impact. Instead Instead, the impracticality came from the fact that it generated enormous amounts of power in seconds and its economically unfeasible to store power on an industrial scale and setting set up enough of these things so that one would constantly go off every few seconds was just not logistically possible.



*** Playing against the house is always this trope. Even the most successful playing teams required massive investments of capital (to weather long losing streaks) and incredible investments of time. The aforementioned $170/hr earnings is RAW revenue, which doesn't take into account the time for training or the ROI for capital. The actual numbers point to the investors making about a 50% profit over 2 years, and the actual players making something on the order of $10/hr accounting for all the time spent. In other words, the MIT players would have been better off working at Dunkin Donuts. Playing against others, on the other hand, can certainly be profitable (mostly because of the large number of mediocre players).

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*** Playing against the house is always this trope. Even the most successful playing teams required massive investments of capital (to weather long losing streaks) and incredible investments of time. The aforementioned $170/hr earnings is are RAW revenue, which doesn't take into account the time for training or the ROI for capital. The actual numbers point to the investors making about a 50% profit over 2 years, and the actual players making something on the order of $10/hr accounting for all the time spent. In other words, the MIT players would have been better off working at Dunkin Donuts. Playing against others, on the other hand, can certainly be profitable (mostly because of the a large number of mediocre players).



* Dubai seems to be the epitome of the high tech, ultramodern city with its numerous flashy skyscrapers and ambitious building projects. However, the city itself lacks critical infrastructure that is taken for granted in literally any other industrial nation, such as a centralized sewer system. Though the city has adequate treatment facilities to process all of the waste it generates, the problem is actually transporting the waste to said facilities. With no pipes or sewers, the majority of the city's waste is carried by tanker truck, which can lead to long queues that can force a drive to wait at least 24 hours. It's not uncommon for tanker truck drivers to simply dump their waste wherever they can rather than wait.

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* Dubai seems to be the epitome of the high tech, ultramodern ultra modern city with its numerous flashy skyscrapers and ambitious building projects. However, the city itself lacks critical infrastructure that is taken for granted in literally any other industrial nation, such as a centralized sewer system. Though the city has adequate treatment facilities to process all of the waste it generates, the problem is actually transporting the waste to said facilities. With no pipes or sewers, the majority of the city's waste is carried by tanker truck, which can lead to long queues that can force a drive to wait at least 24 hours. It's not uncommon for tanker truck drivers to simply dump their waste wherever they can rather than wait.



** Which is compounded by the fact that the Burj Khalifa is not not even connected to a sewer due to Dubai's lack of a centralized sewer system. All of the waste the building generates is stored in a massive septic tank which has to be regularly emptied by entire convoys of tanker trucks, which have to physically carry all the waste to the nearest treatment plant.
** When a "megaproject" looks like it has been grafted onto a much poorer or smaller community that looks like it cannot support such a project, it generally is an example of this trope, like a giant hotel in North Korea, or Romania's oversize Palace of the Parliament that destroyed an entire neighbourhood in its contruction.

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** Which is compounded by the fact that the Burj Khalifa is not not even connected to a sewer due to Dubai's lack of a centralized sewer system. All of the waste the building generates is stored in a massive septic tank which has to be regularly emptied by entire convoys of tanker trucks, which have to physically carry all the waste to the nearest treatment plant.
** When a "megaproject" looks like it has been grafted onto a much poorer or smaller community that looks like it cannot support such a project, it generally is an example of this trope, like a giant hotel in North Korea, or Romania's oversize Palace of the Parliament that destroyed an entire neighbourhood in its contruction.construction.



* [[http://inhabitat.com/china-developing-traffic-straddling-bus-that-drives-over-cars/ The Chinese Vehicle Straddling Bus,]] admit it; that thing looks all kinds of awesome. The idea, presumably, is to create a bus that is more convenient than its lane hogging brother. What they have actually done is invent a bus that if it accidentally swerves, to even the smallest degree, it will cause a three car pile-up - a prospect even more frightening when you add the prospect of many tons of bus landing on your head. Its doors are 9 feet above ground, entailing a complete refit of every bus stop on its route. Oh, and don't think this is just some crazy concept vehicle - the Chinese are fully planning to not only bring this thing into full service by 2011, but also sell it to America.

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* [[http://inhabitat.com/china-developing-traffic-straddling-bus-that-drives-over-cars/ The Chinese Vehicle Straddling Bus,]] admit it; that thing looks all kinds of awesome. The idea, presumably, is to create a bus that is more convenient than its lane hogging brother. What they have actually done is invent a bus that if it accidentally swerves, to even the smallest degree, it will cause a three car three-car pile-up - a prospect even more frightening when you add the prospect of many tons of bus landing on your head. Its doors are 9 feet above ground, entailing a complete refit of every bus stop on its route. Oh, and don't think this is just some crazy concept vehicle - the Chinese are fully planning to not only bring this thing into full service by 2011, but also sell it to America.



** The [[http://www.railpictures.net/photo/486227 Union Pacific Coal Turbine]]. ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: So you have plenty of coal at hand, enough to feed steam monsters like the Challenger or the Big Boy. But you want to go away from steam with its abysmal efficiency. What do you do with all that cheap coal? Burn it in a turbine like you would burn liquid fuel in a gas turbine. But wait, you can't simply dump pieces of coal into a turboshaft engine, they'd take too long to burn, so what do you do? Grind the coal to dust in the tender that's been converted to a mobile coal bunker. Why that's a bad idea? Because the coal dust will be accelerated to very high speeds in the turbine whose blades will be under constant bombardment of tiny pieces of solid fuel which actually don't come out of the grinder in the tender ''that'' tiny. Also, the sulphur in the coal will turn into sulphuric acid which will eat away your precious turbine blades. Maintenance of this monster (which still doesn't have enough space for a cab so it has to be [=MUed=] from an Alco PA-1 running ahead which eliminates the need of firing up the turbine for marshalling) will be so costly that you could also have burned mineral oil in the first place.
** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Pacific_GTELs Which the UP did as well]]. Their first gas turbine engines ran on 16 wheels and had 4,500hp. The prototype had an on-board fuel reservoir and two cabs, but gas turbines are horrendously thirsty, turbines of that size even moreso, and the range of that locomotive was so minimal that the production units were built with only one cab because the other end was coupled to a 12-wheel oil tender. The third generation became a massive three-section type with 8,500hp which could be increased to 10,000hp by mounting additional electric motors on the tender axles. All these locomotives ran on Bunker C oil which was pretty much refinery leftover and therefore dirt cheap, but they used such insane amounts that the UP had to keep them on the lines as much as possible because leaving them standing with their turbines running was still too costly, and the already bad wear on the turbines would only increase with constant shut downs/start ups. Besides, Bunker C didn't stay that cheap when new uses were found for it in the plastics industry. Now imagine what would have been, had these locomotives still been around by the time of the 1973 Oil Crisis.

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** The [[http://www.railpictures.net/photo/486227 Union Pacific Coal Turbine]]. ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: So you have plenty of coal at hand, enough to feed steam monsters like the Challenger or the Big Boy. But you want to go away from steam with its abysmal efficiency. What do you do with all that cheap coal? Burn it in a turbine like turbine-like you would burn liquid fuel in a gas turbine. But wait, you can't simply dump pieces of coal into a turboshaft engine, they'd take too long to burn, so what do you do? Grind the coal to dust in the tender that's been converted to a mobile coal bunker. Why that's a bad idea? Because the coal dust will be accelerated to very high speeds in the turbine whose blades will be under constant bombardment of tiny pieces of solid fuel which actually don't come out of the grinder in the tender ''that'' tiny. Also, the sulphur in the coal will turn into sulphuric acid which will eat away your precious turbine blades. Maintenance of this monster (which still doesn't have enough space for a cab so it has to be [=MUed=] from an Alco PA-1 running ahead which eliminates the need of firing up the turbine for marshalling) will be so costly that you could also have burned mineral oil in the first place.
** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Pacific_GTELs Which the UP did as well]]. Their first gas turbine engines ran on 16 wheels and had 4,500hp. The prototype had an on-board fuel reservoir and two cabs, but gas turbines are horrendously thirsty, turbines of that size even moreso, more so, and the range of that locomotive was so minimal that the production units were built with only one cab because the other end was coupled to a 12-wheel oil tender. The third generation became a massive three-section type with 8,500hp which could be increased to 10,000hp by mounting additional electric motors on the tender axles. All these locomotives ran on Bunker C oil which was pretty much refinery leftover and therefore dirt cheap, but they used such insane amounts that the UP had to keep them on the lines as much as possible because leaving them standing with their turbines running was still too costly, and the already bad wear on the turbines would only increase with constant shut downs/start ups. Besides, Bunker C didn't stay that cheap when new uses were found for it in the plastics industry. Now imagine what would have been, had these locomotives still been around by the time of the 1973 Oil Crisis.



Otherwise, it was quite half-baked. It had one lateral aisle through the entire engine room. This, however, required the boiler to be placed out of centre, causing the locomotive to be unbalanced. The countermeasure was to fill scrap metal under the floor boards in the aisle which in turn made the locomotive too heavy. The fireman's room was in the middle of the locomotive and prevented any communication between him and the driver; it was also badly ventilated, and the fireman would have burned his shins on the hot air from the firehole, hadn't he worn protectors; and in the event of the locomotive falling over, he wouldn't have had a chance to get out unlike on conventional steamers whose cabs have an open rear end.\\

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Otherwise, it was quite half-baked. It had one lateral aisle through the entire engine room. This, however, required the boiler to be placed out of centre, causing the locomotive to be unbalanced. The countermeasure was to fill scrap metal under the floor boards in the aisle which in turn made the locomotive too heavy. The fireman's room was in the middle of the locomotive and prevented any communication between him and the driver; it was also badly ventilated, and the fireman would have burned his shins on the hot air from the firehole, Firehole, hadn't he worn protectors; and in the event of the locomotive falling over, he wouldn't have had a chance to get out unlike on conventional steamers whose cabs have an open rear end.\\



* In the UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague, many teams are tempted to draft a Quarterback first overall, given half a chance. However, there are only two ways to acquire the first overall draft pick: Either being the worst team in the league in the previous season or trading for it, which in effect means giving up either top tier players or several draft picks, which translates to less room for growing the roster and filling weak spots with better young talent. Sure signing the exciting new gunslinger who just won the Heismann Trophy and led his team to the national championship is ''tempting'', but even if he does not prove to be a bust (surprisingly common) he will most likely be surrounded by a team that ''earned'' their spot as the worst team in the league, and a relatively inexperienced new quarterback can sometimes be a ''detriment''. If the first draft pick was acquired in a trade, you might get a good team in the first year (when the new QB is still learning the ropes), but having given up all those picks to trade up to number one ''will'' hurt you in the years afterwards. BoringButPractical solutions like trading away first overall and / or building defense and the offensive line instead can be much more rewarding in the medium or even long term. However, this is kind of a LuckBasedMission, because in some cases the first overall pick really does live up to the hype, like both Manning brothers who have both won two [[UsefulNotes/SuperBowl Vince Lombardi Trophies]] a piece and Eli Manning is still active.

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* In the UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague, many teams are tempted to draft a Quarterback first overall, given half a chance. However, there are only two ways to acquire the first overall draft pick: Either being the worst team in the league in the previous season or trading for it, which in effect means giving up either top tier players or several draft picks, which translates to less room for growing the roster and filling weak spots with better young talent. Sure signing the exciting new gunslinger who just won the Heismann Heisman Trophy and led his team to the national championship is ''tempting'', but even if he does not prove to be a bust (surprisingly common) he will most likely be surrounded by a team that ''earned'' their spot as the worst team in the league, and a relatively inexperienced new quarterback can sometimes be a ''detriment''. If the first draft pick was acquired in a trade, you might get a good team in the first year (when the new QB is still learning the ropes), but having given up all those picks to trade up to number one ''will'' hurt you in the years afterwards. BoringButPractical solutions like trading away first overall and / or building defense and the offensive line instead can be much more rewarding in the medium or even long term. However, this is kind of a LuckBasedMission, because in some cases the first overall pick really does live up to the hype, like both Manning brothers who have both won two [[UsefulNotes/SuperBowl Vince Lombardi Trophies]] a piece and Eli Manning is still active.



* The UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague tries its damnedest to avert this trope. Over time the NFL has turned into ''more'' of a passing league and (arguably) BoringButPractical "three yards and a cloud of dust" offenses are becoming rarer and rarer in favor of high risk high reward gunslinger offenses and trick plays are usually encouraged rather than looked down upon. There was one area in which the NFL did play this trope straight for a long time, namely extra points. Teams that just scored a touchdown would get the ball at the two and a half yard line and get one extra point for a field goal from that position and two extra points for a touchdown. Statistics show that a field goal from so short a distance has a success rate well north of 99% and there is only a roughly 45% chance of the two point conversion being made, making the two pointer AwesomeButImpractical in all situations but games where one point is useless but two points make it a tie game. The NFL, however decided to move the extra point back to the 15 yard line (while leaving two point attempts at the same point), which has proven to make teams a little more inclined to go for two.

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* The UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague tries its damnedest to avert this trope. Over time the NFL has turned into ''more'' of a passing league and (arguably) BoringButPractical "three yards and a cloud of dust" offenses are becoming rarer and rarer in favor of high risk high reward gunslinger offenses and trick plays are usually encouraged rather than looked down upon. There was one area in which the NFL did play this trope straight for a long time, namely extra points. Teams that just scored a touchdown would get the ball at the two and a half yard line and get one extra point for a field goal from that position and two extra points for a touchdown. Statistics show that a field goal from so short a distance has a success rate well north of 99% and there is only a roughly 45% chance of the two point two-point conversion being made, making the two pointer AwesomeButImpractical in all situations but games where one point is useless but two points make it a tie game. The NFL, however decided to move the extra point back to the 15 yard line (while leaving two point two-point attempts at the same point), which has proven to make teams a little more inclined to go for two.



* Throwing knives fall into this category. They're fun as a hobbyist's toy, but the precision required to attack and injure a moving target is impossible to reliably use--especially since they're too light to have real stopping power unless you get that perfect shot, and any flinching of the target's might throw that off.

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* Throwing knives fall into this category. They're fun as a hobbyist's toy, but the precision required to attack and injure a moving target is impossible to reliably use--especially since they're too light to have real stopping power unless you get that perfect shot, and any flinching of the target's targets might throw that off.



** Applies also to throwing stars (shurikken), although they don't take years to learn (TheBladeAlwaysLandsPointyEndIn is TruthInTelevision for a weapon that has blades all around).
* Nunchucks. They're certainly a flashy weapon to show off with in martial arts demonstrations, and being able to master one's use requires a very high level of discipline and finesse. Unfortunately, they're very difficult to train with, and simpler weapons do their job better[[note]]Historically, nunchaku were adapted from grain flails, and they were used the same way a Western flail is: [[BoringButPractical by simply swinging it upside an opponent's head]][[/note]].

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** Applies also to throwing stars (shurikken), (shuriken), although they don't take years to learn (TheBladeAlwaysLandsPointyEndIn is TruthInTelevision for a weapon that has blades all around).
* Nunchucks. They're certainly a flashy weapon to show off with in within martial arts demonstrations, and being able to master one's use requires a very high level of discipline and finesse. Unfortunately, they're very difficult to train with, and simpler weapons do their job better[[note]]Historically, nunchaku were adapted from grain flails, and they were used the same way a Western flail is: [[BoringButPractical by simply swinging it upside an opponent's head]][[/note]].



** In particular, the Ingram MAC-10 and MAC-11 machine pistols were good examples of this trope. Being more compact than submachine guns and being robust and extremely easy to manufacture, they possessed an ''awesome'' firing rate - almost double that of similar-looking Israeli Uzi machine pistol. Howewer, the extremely rapid firing rate and flimsy backstock also meant they were ''horribly'' inaccurate at any ranges beyond 20 m or so, earning a reputation of "bullet sprayers". It was also all too easy to shoot the whole magazine empty with just one squeeze of trigger. While some special forces got interested in the MAC-10, MAC did not get contracts and went bust in 1975. As well as that, the .45 ACP/9x19mm MAC-10 had its strengths, but the MAC-11 was a complete disaster. It was tinier than the MAC-10, but chambered in .380 ACP, which gave it extremely heavy recoil. The MAC-11 also had a faster rate of fire, which emptied the magazine even quicker than before and with the heavy recoil, made it practically inaccurate unless at close range.

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** In particular, the Ingram MAC-10 and MAC-11 machine pistols were good examples of this trope. Being more compact than submachine guns and being robust and extremely easy to manufacture, they possessed an ''awesome'' firing rate - almost double that of similar-looking Israeli Uzi machine pistol. Howewer, However, the extremely rapid firing rate and flimsy backstock also meant they were ''horribly'' inaccurate at any ranges beyond 20 m or so, earning a reputation of "bullet sprayers". It was also all too easy to shoot the whole magazine empty with just one squeeze of trigger. While some special forces got interested in the MAC-10, MAC did not get contracts and went bust in 1975. As well as that, the .45 ACP/9x19mm MAC-10 had its strengths, but the MAC-11 was a complete disaster. It was tinier than the MAC-10, but chambered in .380 ACP, which gave it extremely heavy recoil. The MAC-11 also had a faster rate of fire, which emptied the magazine even quicker than before and with the heavy recoil, made it practically inaccurate unless at close range.



* Any form of [[HumongousMecha giant robot]] in general. The very fact that these mechs have legs makes them easy to disable: just break the legs and they're useless. If there are going to be any giant robot warmachines in the real world, they will have less vulnerable means of standing upright, like tank treads - as in the case of Guntank. For now.

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* Any form of [[HumongousMecha giant robot]] in general. The very fact that these mechs have legs makes them easy to disable: just break the legs and they're useless. If there are going to be any giant robot warmachines war machines in the real world, they will have less vulnerable means of standing upright, like tank treads - as in the case of Guntank. For now.



* Large-capacity cylindrical magazines, such as the notorious 50-round drum on the Thompson SMG or the helical magizine on the futuristic-looking Calico M690. They allow a user to fire more shots between reloading, and look cool besides, but they're notoriously unwieldy, prone to malfunction, and take an age and a half to restock. Military forces by and large have decided to just continue using the BoringButPractical stick or box magazines instead; a soldier might only have 30 rounds in the magazine, but at least they won't need dozens of extra-large pockets to carry the spares.
** Ultra high capacity magazines in general run into this trope in the civilian market, regardless of shape. Unless you are using a belt fed system, which is rare in the civilian market, that ammo needs a spring that can move all that weight. The bigger the magazine the bigger the difference between the spring force of the first and last bullet. This causes Ultra high capacity magazines to have loading errors much more frequently than lower capacity magazines. And that's not even considering the weight the magazine has when its full.

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* Large-capacity cylindrical magazines, such as the notorious 50-round drum on the Thompson SMG or the helical magizine magazine on the futuristic-looking Calico M690. They allow a user to fire more shots between reloading, and look cool besides, but they're notoriously unwieldy, prone to malfunction, and take an age and a half to restock. Military forces by and large have decided to just continue using the BoringButPractical stick or box magazines instead; a soldier might only have 30 rounds in the magazine, but at least they won't need dozens of extra-large pockets to carry the spares.
** Ultra high capacity magazines in general run into this trope in the civilian market, regardless of shape. Unless you are using a belt fed belt-fed system, which is rare in the civilian market, that ammo needs a spring that can move all that weight. The bigger the magazine the bigger the difference between the spring force of the first and last bullet. This causes Ultra high capacity magazines to have loading errors much more frequently than lower capacity magazines. And that's not even considering the weight the magazine has when its full.



* [[http://www.necomimi.com/ Necomimi]] ears are cat ears that move in response to your forehead muscles, and while they look cute, they'll run you at least 100 USD. They can also, as a promotional video shows, completely ruin a pokerface should you wear one while playing cards.

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* [[http://www.necomimi.com/ Necomimi]] ears are cat ears that move in response to your forehead muscles, and while they look cute, they'll run you at least 100 USD. They can also, as a promotional video shows, completely ruin a pokerface poker face should you wear one while playing cards.



* Some animals end up getting stuck with this as part of their evolutionary adaptation, with the best example being the extinct saber toothed cat. A muscular big cat with elongated banana-sized teeth jutting out of its front jaw must have been the ultimate badass right? Well...evidence has shown that those impressive canines were less fearsome than they appear. While it did help in killing large animals, said animals had to be held still by the cat's prodigious strength to prevent their delicate teeth from breaking from the strain of struggling prey, unlike the teeth of today's big cats which are more durable.

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* Some animals end up getting stuck with this as part of their evolutionary adaptation, with the best example being the extinct saber toothed saber-toothed cat. A muscular big cat with elongated banana-sized teeth jutting out of its front jaw must have been the ultimate badass right? Well...evidence has shown that those impressive canines were less fearsome than they appear. While it did help in killing large animals, said animals had to be held still by the cat's prodigious strength to prevent their delicate teeth from breaking from the strain of struggling prey, unlike the teeth of today's big cats which are more durable.
20th Jan '18 1:20:50 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** Expanding on the mention of the "teacup" grip above, the stance is popular in movies and on TV because it allows for a better view of the handgun, but actors are firing blank cartridges and they don't have to deal with the recoil that comes with live ammunition. In real life, cupping your non-dominant hand beneath the grip makes the weapon considerably harder to control because that hand is doing nothing to help brace the gun, resulting in a heavy, bucking muzzle flip that severely hurts your follow-up accuracy. Speaking of severe hurting, try using that grip on an especially powerful handgun and then have fun explaining how you got that nice, shiny new lump on your forehead (meaning: [[DontTryThisAtHome don't try it).

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** Expanding on the mention of the "teacup" grip above, the stance is popular in movies and on TV because it allows for a better view of the handgun, but actors are firing blank cartridges and they don't have to deal with the recoil that comes with live ammunition. In real life, cupping your non-dominant hand beneath the grip makes the weapon considerably harder to control because that hand is doing nothing to help brace the gun, resulting in a heavy, bucking muzzle flip that severely hurts your follow-up accuracy. Speaking of severe hurting, try using that grip on an especially powerful handgun and then have fun explaining how you got that nice, shiny new lump on your forehead (meaning: (i.e. [[DontTryThisAtHome don't try it).it]]).
20th Jan '18 1:19:45 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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Added DiffLines:

** Expanding on the mention of the "teacup" grip above, the stance is popular in movies and on TV because it allows for a better view of the handgun, but actors are firing blank cartridges and they don't have to deal with the recoil that comes with live ammunition. In real life, cupping your non-dominant hand beneath the grip makes the weapon considerably harder to control because that hand is doing nothing to help brace the gun, resulting in a heavy, bucking muzzle flip that severely hurts your follow-up accuracy. Speaking of severe hurting, try using that grip on an especially powerful handgun and then have fun explaining how you got that nice, shiny new lump on your forehead (meaning: [[DontTryThisAtHome don't try it).
13th Jan '18 5:52:01 PM Antigone3
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Added DiffLines:

*** In the centuries before decent [=OB/GYN=] care, wide hips on a woman were believed to be a sign that she could survive childbirth -- the Caesarian section was normally only performed on a dead or dying mother in the hopes that at least the kid would live. Unfortunately, while a larger pelvic opening does make vaginal childbirth easier, wide hips don't always equal a large pelvic opening. In addition, the male pelvis is better adapted to walking than the female.
4th Jan '18 2:19:23 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** Card counters, rounders, folks who teach games, and professional poker players all beg to differ. Note that most such things are perfectly legal. MIT's famous team, inspiration for the fictional film ''Film/TwentyOne'' and a few more accurate books and documentaries, documented earnings near $170 USD per hour. Adjusted from 1982 dollars to 2012, that is nearly $380 USD per hour. Of course, a simple look at [[RealityEnsues the ratio of successful card counters, rounders etc. to folks driven to the poor house by their gambling]] should give any thinking individual pause. Also, some casinos have people in security who know how to spot card counters and rounders and will boot out anyone trying to do so-- note also that a practice being legal does '''not''' mean that a private establishment owner is powerless stop you from doing it on their property.

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** Card counters, rounders, folks who teach games, and professional poker players all beg to differ. Note that most such things are perfectly legal. MIT's famous team, inspiration for the fictional film ''Film/TwentyOne'' and a few more accurate books and documentaries, documented earnings near $170 USD per hour. Adjusted from 1982 dollars to 2012, that is nearly $380 USD per hour. Of course, a simple look at [[RealityEnsues the ratio of successful card counters, rounders etc. to folks driven to the poor house by their gambling]] should give any thinking individual pause. Also, some casinos have people in security who know how to spot card counters and rounders and will boot out anyone trying to do so-- note also that a practice being legal does '''not''' mean that a private establishment owner is powerless to stop you from doing it on their property.
4th Jan '18 2:00:54 PM Miracle@StOlaf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Card counters, rounders, folks who teach games, and professional poker players all beg to differ. Note that most such things are perfectly legal. MIT's famous team, inspiration for the fictional film ''Film/TwentyOne'' and a few more accurate books and documentaries, documented earnings near $170 USD per hour. Adjusted from 1982 dollars to 2012, that is nearly $380 USD per hour. Of course, a simple look at [[RealityEnsues the ratio of successful card counters, rounders etc. to folks driven to the poor house by their gambling]] should give any thinking individual pause. Also, some casinos have people in security who know how to spot card counters and rounders and will boot out anyone trying to do so (note that a practice being legal does '''not''' mean that a private establishment can't stop you from doing it).

to:

** Card counters, rounders, folks who teach games, and professional poker players all beg to differ. Note that most such things are perfectly legal. MIT's famous team, inspiration for the fictional film ''Film/TwentyOne'' and a few more accurate books and documentaries, documented earnings near $170 USD per hour. Adjusted from 1982 dollars to 2012, that is nearly $380 USD per hour. Of course, a simple look at [[RealityEnsues the ratio of successful card counters, rounders etc. to folks driven to the poor house by their gambling]] should give any thinking individual pause. Also, some casinos have people in security who know how to spot card counters and rounders and will boot out anyone trying to do so (note so-- note also that a practice being legal does '''not''' mean that a private establishment can't owner is powerless stop you from doing it).it on their property.
4th Jan '18 1:51:33 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** Card counters, rounders, folks who teach games, and professional poker players all beg to differ. Note that most such things are perfectly legal. MIT's famous team, inspiration for the fictional film ''Film/TwentyOne'' and a few more accurate books and documentaries, documented earnings near $170 USD per hour. Adjusted from 1982 dollars to 2012, that is nearly $380 USD per hour. Of course, a simple look at [[RealityEnsues the ratio of successful card counters, rounders etc. to folks driven to the poor house by their gambling]] should give any thinking individual pause. Also, some casinos have people in security who know how to spot card counters and rounders and will boot out anyone trying to do so.

to:

** Card counters, rounders, folks who teach games, and professional poker players all beg to differ. Note that most such things are perfectly legal. MIT's famous team, inspiration for the fictional film ''Film/TwentyOne'' and a few more accurate books and documentaries, documented earnings near $170 USD per hour. Adjusted from 1982 dollars to 2012, that is nearly $380 USD per hour. Of course, a simple look at [[RealityEnsues the ratio of successful card counters, rounders etc. to folks driven to the poor house by their gambling]] should give any thinking individual pause. Also, some casinos have people in security who know how to spot card counters and rounders and will boot out anyone trying to do so.so (note that a practice being legal does '''not''' mean that a private establishment can't stop you from doing it).
4th Jan '18 1:48:44 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages, and caused ripple effects on food prices, i.e. allocating huge amounts of land to grow corn for biofuel drives up the price of corn, which in turn makes every foodstuff that requires corn (which is ''a hell of a lot'') more expensive. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.

to:

* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages, and caused ripple effects on food prices, i.e. allocating huge amounts of land to grow corn for biofuel drives up the price of corn, which in turn makes every foodstuff that requires corn (which --which is ''a hell of a lot'') lot'' more of them than you might think-- more expensive. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.
4th Jan '18 1:42:30 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.

to:

* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages.shortages, and caused ripple effects on food prices, i.e. allocating huge amounts of land to grow corn for biofuel drives up the price of corn, which in turn makes every foodstuff that requires corn (which is ''a hell of a lot'') more expensive. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.
4th Jan '18 1:24:28 AM Giantsgiants
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** Similarly, many interfaces on TV's, video game consoles, websites, etc tend to fall more towards this trope with each update. The result is a design that looks more sleek and modern than the previous version, but is less accessible and harder to navigate. This trope is why many of such updates are mentioned on TheyChangedItNowItSucks.

to:

** Similarly, many interfaces on TV's, video game consoles, websites, etc tend to fall more towards this trope with each update. The result is a design that looks more sleek and modern than the previous version, but is less accessible and harder to navigate. This trope is why many of such these updates are mentioned on TheyChangedItNowItSucks.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=AwesomeButImpractical.RealLife