History AwesomeButImpractical / RealLife

24th Jun '18 1:55:47 PM MidnightMan
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* The French [[http://www.trainweb.org/tgvpages/p01.html TGV Pendulaire P-01]] was seen as a solution for the problem that the expansion of the high-speed TGV network required the construction of new high-speed lines or at least the costly conversion of existing lines for higher speeds: Just build a TGV that tilts in curves! After all, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyATQYI4npM tilting trains were highly successful in Italy where they're called Pendolino]], so why not do this with the TGV? Why not take France's flagship train one step further to coolness and make a tilting train out if it? Why not, you may ask? Well, due to the way that the carbodies of the TGV's intermediate sections are mounted, it is impossible to tilt each one of them independently. Alstom didn't realize that before they had actually started building the P-01. The only way to make it work was to tilt all intermediate sections at once. This meant that the first intermediate section would tilt way too late, and the last one would tilt way too early, thus making going through tight curves even less comfortable than without tilting. Thus, the prototype has never been used in revenue service.
* In TheNineties, the Japanese Railways wanted to increase the coolness factor of the Shinkansen bullet trains with a new generation, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/500_Series_Shinkansen 500 series]], the first of its kind to reach [=300km/h=]. In order to also make it look as fast as it was, and to get away from the not-too-pleasant, blocky looks of the previous generations, the 500 series' cross-section was made rather rounded instead of almost square. This, however, came at the cost of a tight and cramped interior. So the 500 series is about as cool to behold as it's unpleasant to ride. It also turned out very expensive to build and maintain, and since people weren't willing to ride it and chose the older generations instead (which is easy on a line where you have a train every few minutes), it didn't nearly cover its own costs. Only ten were built.
22nd Jun '18 4:11:58 PM DesertDragon
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* Flying cars. A staple of science fiction, sure, but consider the drawbacks when it comes to safety, energy efficiency, the fact it's difficult to take off and land vertically in a very stable manner, etc. Most real life attempts at building one also require a pilot's license which is rather more difficult to obtain than a standard driver's license. In other words, just go to flight school and learn to fly a small airplane. In fact, all existing "flying cars" are actually less of a flying car, and more of a drivable airplane.

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* Flying cars. The mythical FlyingCar. A staple of science fiction, sure, but consider the drawbacks when it comes to safety, energy efficiency, the fact it's difficult to take off and land vertically in a very stable manner, etc. Most real life all attempts at building one also require a pilot's license which is rather more difficult to obtain than a standard driver's license. In other words, just go to flight school combining automobile and learn to fly a small airplane. In fact, all existing "flying cars" aircraft have failed because their functional needs are actually less of a flying car, so different, making something that does both only succeeds in making it handle poorly at both, in addition to being expensive and more of a drivable airplane. gas-guzzling. Those that do exist are better described as "roadable aircraft," meaning they're airplanes whose wings can be collapsed or detached so it can be driven on the road (say, from the airstrip to private storage); they're not meant to replace your day-to-day car.
21st Jun '18 1:26:35 AM LeGurdah
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*** Though some historical armies (such as the medieval Portuguese) used a sword an a knife, it's still not much better. When it did pay off, [[RefugeInAudacity it was often because of its novelty]].

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*** Though some historical armies (such as the medieval Portuguese) used a sword an and a knife, it's still not much better. When it did pay off, [[RefugeInAudacity it was often because of its novelty]].
22nd May '18 12:42:30 AM BradyLady
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** Big debates have sprung up over slope-backed or straight-backed German Shepherds.
7th May '18 8:02:12 PM nombretomado
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** Exemplified by the Bugatti Veyron. Designed to be the fastest "production" car ever designed, it can go 252 miles an hour. Assuming you can find a straight road long enough to let you do so (you can't, except on test tracks). And assuming you don't run out of gas (it will go through the entire tank in 12 minutes) or have an catastrophic blowout (the tires will let go after fifteen minutes ''when they're brand new'' at top speed). It's also a production car in a very limited sense: only ten were made, and sold with a $1,000,000 price tag. Despite the fact that each one cost Bugatti (aka Volkswagen) $5,000,000 to make ([[TopGear I don't think they have the best accountants]]).\\

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** Exemplified by the Bugatti Veyron. Designed to be the fastest "production" car ever designed, it can go 252 miles an hour. Assuming you can find a straight road long enough to let you do so (you can't, except on test tracks). And assuming you don't run out of gas (it will go through the entire tank in 12 minutes) or have an catastrophic blowout (the tires will let go after fifteen minutes ''when they're brand new'' at top speed). It's also a production car in a very limited sense: only ten were made, and sold with a $1,000,000 price tag. Despite the fact that each one cost Bugatti (aka Volkswagen) $5,000,000 to make ([[TopGear ([[Series/TopGearUK I don't think they have the best accountants]]).\\



The Bugatti Veyron isn't even a good track car for the price due to the fact that it is just so heavy. With the Veyron, you get very little bang for your buck as you can honestly drive faster on most racetracks and roads in general with a much lighter and less expensive sports car. For instance, the Lamborghini Huracán, also developed under Volkswagen, costs $320,000 [=USD=] fully equipped. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Top_Gear_test_track_Power_Lap_Times It beat the Veyron on the Series/TopGear test track by 1 second.]] As it turns out, the Huracán even beat the allegedly higher-tier Lamborghini Aventador [=LP700-4=].

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The Bugatti Veyron isn't even a good track car for the price due to the fact that it is just so heavy. With the Veyron, you get very little bang for your buck as you can honestly drive faster on most racetracks and roads in general with a much lighter and less expensive sports car. For instance, the Lamborghini Huracán, also developed under Volkswagen, costs $320,000 [=USD=] fully equipped. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Top_Gear_test_track_Power_Lap_Times It beat the Veyron on the Series/TopGear ''Series/TopGearUK'' test track by 1 second.]] As it turns out, the Huracán even beat the allegedly higher-tier Lamborghini Aventador [=LP700-4=].



** Unless you're [[Series/TopGear James May]].

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** Unless you're [[Series/TopGear [[Series/TopGearUK James May]].
7th May '18 8:01:56 PM nombretomado
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Additionally, the tires will wear out much more quickly if drifting is performed regularly (as demonstrated by Jeremy Clarkson on ''Series/TopGear'' and Tanner Faust on ''Series/TopGearUS''). This can be a money pit with sports tires so don't unless you have the cash to spare.

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Additionally, the tires will wear out much more quickly if drifting is performed regularly (as demonstrated by Jeremy Clarkson on ''Series/TopGear'' ''Series/TopGearUK'' and Tanner Faust on ''Series/TopGearUS''). This can be a money pit with sports tires so don't unless you have the cash to spare.
3rd May '18 6:13:08 PM Kurogane7
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* IaijutsuPractitioner... if only you can actually USE it in the battlefield. Trying to kill a man with one stroke needs VERY close proximity. When used in duelling however, [[DifficultButAwesome that’s a different story]].

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* IaijutsuPractitioner... if only you can actually USE it in the battlefield. Trying to kill a man with one stroke needs VERY close proximity. When used in self-defense and duelling however, [[DifficultButAwesome that’s a different story]].
2nd May '18 2:47:41 PM danlansdowne
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* The [[SpacePlane Space Shuttle]]. The idea was to build a spacecraft that could handle any mission the US government needed to fly, then land on a runway and be reused. Sounds awesome, but it turned out to be impractical. They designed in all sorts of reconnaissance satellite launch features that [[TechnologyMarchesOn became obsolete by the time it flew]]; they had to risk the lives of astronauts on missions that could have been launched fully automated and [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong couldn't design a way for the astronauts to escape during a launch malfunction]]; and "reusable" ended up meaning "[[PyrrhicVictory reusable after a refurbishment that costed almost as much as building a non-reusable rocket]]". NASA, which went from suborbital flights to three-day stays on the Moon with a Moon Jeep without ever losing an astronaut in flight, lost two crews of seven to the Shuttle's impractical design; the government therefore switched back to expendable rockets for military satellites, and industry didn't use it very much either. The Shuttle wasn't a total waste—it *did* fly every manned NASA mission for thirty years and it accomplished many important missions, including two jobs (repairing the Hubble Space Telescope and building the International Space Station) that no other vehicle could have done as well—but it's hard to believe we wouldn't have been better off dropping used rockets in the ocean for another twenty or thirty years.
* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface — biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages, and caused ripple effects on food prices, i.e. allocating huge amounts of land to grow corn for biofuel drives up the price of corn, which in turn makes every foodstuff that requires corn --which is ''a hell of a lot'' more of them than you might think-- more expensive. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.

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* The [[SpacePlane Space Shuttle]]. The idea was to build a spacecraft that could handle any mission the US government needed to fly, then land on a runway and be reused. Sounds awesome, but it turned out to be impractical. They designed in all sorts of reconnaissance satellite launch features that [[TechnologyMarchesOn became obsolete by the time it flew]]; they had to risk the lives of astronauts on missions that could have been launched fully automated and [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong couldn't design a way for the astronauts to escape during a launch malfunction]]; and "reusable" ended up meaning "[[PyrrhicVictory reusable after a refurbishment that costed cost almost as much as building a non-reusable rocket]]". NASA, which NASA went from suborbital flights to three-day stays on the Moon with a Moon Jeep without ever losing an astronaut in flight, lost flight to losing two crews of seven to the Shuttle's impractical design; the government therefore switched back to expendable rockets for military satellites, and industry didn't use it very much either. The Shuttle wasn't a total waste—it *did* waste - it ''did'' fly every manned NASA mission for thirty years and it accomplished many important missions, including two jobs (repairing the Hubble Space Telescope and building the International Space Station) that no other vehicle could have done as well—but well - but it's hard to believe we wouldn't have been better off dropping used rockets in the ocean for another twenty or thirty years.
* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface — biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages, and caused ripple effects on food prices, i.e. allocating huge amounts of land to grow corn for biofuel drives up the price of corn, which in turn makes every foodstuff that requires corn --which - which is ''a hell of a lot'' more of them than you might think-- think - more expensive. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.
1st May '18 9:07:10 PM Jhonny
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** The [=A380=] suffers from a miscalculation on the part of Airbus as to what aviation would develop into. At the time the [=A380=] was developed, most airlines operated under a "hub and spoke" model, flying people into one or a few big airports and from there to their final destinations. While airlines such as Delta (Atlanta) Lufthansa (Frankfurt) and the Gulf carriers (Dubai, Dohar and so on) still do that and indeed the Gulf carriers are among the biggest customers for the plane, most newer entrants on the market and much of the growth is in "point to point" flights with twin engined planes that seat 200 or less flying between secondary airports. Customers get direct flights even if they don't live near a hub UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail takes over some feeding flights and the airlines only have to order and maintain one type of aircraft. But the [=A380=] has no place in that picture.
26th Apr '18 9:26:25 PM Gsueagle31049
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*** A specific example that best personifies the trope is the [[https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/predator-model/NH.Q1RAA.001 Acer Predator 21X]]. Among its features are a Cherry MX Brown mechanical keyboard, a curved 21-inch (533 mm), G-Sync enabled 120Hz display, an overclockable Seventh-generation Intel Core i7 CPU, dual 8 GB GTX 1080s in SLI, and 64 GB DDR4 RAM. When plugging in the "laptop", it requires ''two'' AC adapters, each at 330 watts. The computer weighs a whopping ''19 pounds'' (8.6 kg) and comes with a large wheeled case to transport it. Its insane specs commands an equally insane price tag at $9,000; one could get its [[https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/predator-model/UD.P01AA.753 closest desktop counterpart]][[note]]The Predator G6 only comes with 16 GB RAM and a single 11 GB GTX 1080 Ti[[/note]] for nearly one-third to half of the price of the Predator 21X, even when factoring in other upgrades.

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*** A specific example that best personifies the trope is the [[https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/predator-model/NH.Q1RAA.001 Acer Predator 21X]]. Among its features are a Cherry MX Brown mechanical keyboard, a curved 21-inch (533 mm), G-Sync enabled mm) ultrawide 120Hz display, an overclockable Seventh-generation Intel Core i7 CPU, dual 8 GB GTX 1080s in SLI, and 64 GB DDR4 of RAM. When plugging in the "laptop", "laptop" [[note]]more accurately, the Predator 21x could be considered a desktop replacement computer[[/note]], it requires ''two'' AC adapters, each at 330 watts. The computer weighs a whopping ''19 pounds'' (8.6 kg) and comes with a large wheeled case to transport it. Its insane specs commands an equally insane price tag at $9,000; one could get its [[https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/predator-model/UD.P01AA.753 closest a desktop counterpart]][[note]]The Predator G6 only comes with 16 GB RAM and a single 11 GB GTX 1080 Ti[[/note]] of similar specification for nearly roughly one-third to half of one-half the price of the Predator 21X, even when factoring in other upgrades.price.
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