History AwesomeButImpractical / RealLife

26th Apr '16 5:36:49 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbojet_train Jet engine powered trains]]. Nuff said.
25th Apr '16 9:14:14 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* For that matter, Brunel's broad gauge. While the standard gauge rail lines had a loading gauge that was much too small, causing problems to this day with bilevel railcars and when trains cross from continental Europe (the first generation of Eurostar had to be custom built for a lot of British quirks, including the rather narrow loading gauge), Brunel's broad gauge caused problems in the opposite direction. You see, the main reason for a small lauding gauge is that it saves a lot of money. Brunel's trains could only run on broad gauge lines and he could not share his tracks with other railroads nor have his tracks run along other railroad lines. In addition to that building to his exceeding standards was fine on main lines but prohibitively expensive on branch lines and just like airlines today operate feeder services at a loss to get passengers for their main lines, railways without a feeder service would have much lower passenger numbers. The last broad gauge lines were converted to standard gauge before the 19th century was over. Unfortunately, Spain made a similar mistake in chosing a non-standard broad gauge, because [[WhatAnIdiot they thought it would bring advantages]]. It didn't.

to:

* For that matter, Brunel's broad gauge. While the standard gauge rail lines had a loading gauge that was much too small, causing problems to this day with bilevel railcars and when trains cross from continental Europe (the first generation of Eurostar had to be custom built for a lot of British quirks, including the rather narrow loading gauge), Brunel's broad gauge caused problems in the opposite direction. You see, the main reason for a small lauding gauge is that it saves a lot of money. Brunel's trains could only run on broad gauge lines and he could not share his tracks with other railroads nor have his tracks trains run along other railroad lines. In addition to that building to his exceeding standards was fine on main lines but prohibitively expensive on branch lines and just like airlines today operate feeder services at a loss to get passengers for their main lines, railways without a feeder service would have much lower passenger numbers. The last broad gauge lines were converted to standard gauge before the 19th century was over. Unfortunately, Spain made a similar mistake in chosing a non-standard broad gauge, because [[WhatAnIdiot they thought it would bring advantages]]. It didn't.didn't.
* There is no technological barrier to making trains go 400 km/h or even faster than that. In fact, some trains in revenue service today have reached that speed in unmodified test runs. However, due to many factors, including aerodynamics, running trains at those speeds draws way more energy than the increase in speed it produces. Add to that the fact that most trains have to - you know - stop once in a while to load and unload passengers and the difference between a 300 km/h and a 400 km/h train becomes a few minutes of time saved for a few ten thousand euros of money wasted on electricity to accelerate to those speeds. Current Maglev technology is more energy efficient at those high and very high speeds, but it has its own downsides and also fits this trope in many ways. Another problem with extremely high speeds is that tolerances become much smaller and breaking distances become longer, not to mention the infrastructure that does not always support those speeds. In the high speed networks of many countries BoringButPractical solutions like upgrading a curvy legacy line from 80 km/h to a straighter alignment allowing 200 km/h is much more cost efficient and saves much more time along the whole run than high top speeds.
25th Apr '16 7:56:15 AM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Fully-automatic machine pistols, such as the Glock 18, Mac-11 and Tec-9, when it comes to anything other than suppressive fire. They burn through ammo, rapidly overheat, jam easily and are very inaccurate. Although there have been some exceptions, like the Škorpion and the Steyr TMP, most machine pistols can be easily replaced by more reliable submachine guns.

to:

* Fully-automatic machine pistols, such as the Glock 18, Mac-11 and Tec-9, when it comes to anything other than suppressive fire. They burn through ammo, rapidly overheat, jam easily and are very inaccurate. Although there have been some exceptions, like the Škorpion Škorpion, Mauser M712, Micro-Uzi and the Steyr TMP, most machine pistols can be easily replaced by more reliable and controllable submachine guns.
21st Apr '16 2:01:37 PM Gordonjcp
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]] - although it should be borne in mind that this stunt was done by fitting a 13" wheel to one side of the car and a 10" wheel and several hundred kilos of stage weights to the other.

to:

* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]] - although it should be borne in mind that this stunt was done by fitting a 13" wheel to one side of the car and a 10" wheel and several hundred kilos of stage weights to the other.unstable]].


Added DiffLines:

** This stunt was done by fitting a 13" wheel to one side of the car and a 10" wheel and several hundred kilos of stage weights to the other, and in normal road trim the Reliant Robin was far more stable.
21st Apr '16 2:00:45 PM Gordonjcp
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]].

to:

* The Reliant Robin was an entirely plastic three wheeled car from the 70's. It was very light weight, it was legally a motorcycle in its origin nation of the U.K. (meaning a Reliant owner had to pay less on taxes and didn't need a driving licence), and was very popular in the Northern parts of Britain. Problem was, the single wheel was in the front, meaning the thing was VERY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8 unstable]].unstable]] - although it should be borne in mind that this stunt was done by fitting a 13" wheel to one side of the car and a 10" wheel and several hundred kilos of stage weights to the other.
21st Apr '16 7:26:13 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* 'Lightscribe' (and its rivel [=LabelFlash=]) is a technology that allows you to 'print' high quality labels onto optical disks such as [=CDs=], [=DVDs=] and Blu-Rays. The process doesn't require paper, ink, or anything else beyond a special type of drive that costs only a couple of bucks more than a regular drive and special disks that cost only a tiny bit more than regular disks. After you've burned your data, you flip the disk over in your drive and 'burn' the label that you've designed in an easy-to-use labelling program; after a few minutes, a high-quality, high DPI label is embedded into the 'label side' of the disk surface. Unfortunately, it takes about 15 minutes to 'burn' a Lightscribe label, and it takes multiple repeated 'burns' to get an image of satisfactory contrast. You might have a Lightscribe capable drive and not ever know it, because simple permanent markers are just ''faster''.

to:

* 'Lightscribe' (and its rivel rival [=LabelFlash=]) is a technology that allows you to 'print' high quality labels onto optical disks such as [=CDs=], [=DVDs=] and Blu-Rays. The process doesn't require paper, ink, or anything else beyond a special type of drive that costs only a couple of bucks more than a regular drive and special disks that cost only a tiny bit more than regular disks. After you've burned your data, you flip the disk over in your drive and 'burn' the label that you've designed in an easy-to-use labelling program; after a few minutes, a high-quality, high DPI label is embedded into the 'label side' of the disk surface. Unfortunately, it takes about 15 minutes to 'burn' a Lightscribe label, and it takes multiple repeated 'burns' to get an image of satisfactory contrast. You might have a Lightscribe capable drive and not ever know it, because simple permanent markers are just ''faster''.
20th Apr '16 10:44:23 PM StevieC
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** [[IncrediblyLamePun Of course we lava good barbecue]].
20th Apr '16 10:37:14 PM StevieC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* 'Lightscribe' is a technology that allows you to 'print' high quality labels onto optical disks such as [=CDs=], [=DVDs=] and Blu-Rays. The process doesn't require paper, ink, or anything else beyond a special type of drive that costs only a couple of bucks more than a regular drive and special disks that cost only a tiny bit more than regular disks. After you've burned your data, you flip the disk over in your drive and 'burn' the label that you've designed in an easy-to-use labelling program; after a few minutes, a high-quality, high DPI label is embedded into the 'label side' of the disk surface. Unfortunately, it takes about 15 minutes to 'burn' a Lightscribe label, and it takes multiple repeated 'burns' to get an image of satisfactory contrast. You might have a Lightscribe capable drive and not ever know it, because simple permanent markers are just ''faster''.

to:

* 'Lightscribe' (and its rivel [=LabelFlash=]) is a technology that allows you to 'print' high quality labels onto optical disks such as [=CDs=], [=DVDs=] and Blu-Rays. The process doesn't require paper, ink, or anything else beyond a special type of drive that costs only a couple of bucks more than a regular drive and special disks that cost only a tiny bit more than regular disks. After you've burned your data, you flip the disk over in your drive and 'burn' the label that you've designed in an easy-to-use labelling program; after a few minutes, a high-quality, high DPI label is embedded into the 'label side' of the disk surface. Unfortunately, it takes about 15 minutes to 'burn' a Lightscribe label, and it takes multiple repeated 'burns' to get an image of satisfactory contrast. You might have a Lightscribe capable drive and not ever know it, because simple permanent markers are just ''faster''.


Added DiffLines:

*** That being said, [=LightScribe=] and [=LabelFlash=] are genuinely useful for people who have bad handwriting.
20th Apr '16 12:00:10 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message
20th Apr '16 11:33:31 AM dinohunterpat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:



* During the gas crisis of the late 2000s, there was interest in crop-based biofuels as an alternative energy source to oil. The appeal to environmentalists was obvious on the surface — biofuels are made from plant oils rather than petroleum, and as such, they're renewable, generate less pollution, and has a lower carbon footprint. Furthermore, as many biofuels can be extracted from homegrown agricultural crops, there was additional appeal for energy independence. However, while the actual biofuel product itself is inexpensive and environmentally friendly, the process of mass producing it isn't. These fuels require more land, leading to further deforestation that only released trapped carbon and thus increasing global warming. It didn't help that growing biofuels siphoned resources like water away from growing food crops, leading to food and water shortages. Subsequently, most businesses and governments have shelved the notion of immediate replacing petroleum with biofuels, though this idea of sustainable biofuels may become viable again provided that they can be successfully extracted from non-edible and sustainable sources like algae.
This list shows the last 10 events of 602. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=AwesomeButImpractical.RealLife