History Awesome / WilliamShakespeare

12th Oct '15 2:01:59 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Awesome/HenryIVPart2

to:

* %%* Awesome/HenryIVPart2
12th Oct '15 2:01:36 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%%* Awesome/HenryIVPart1
%%* Awesome/HenryIVPart2

to:

%%* * Awesome/HenryIVPart1
%%* * Awesome/HenryIVPart2
7th Jun '12 11:27:58 AM LancelotG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* I would like to nominate the "Pyramus and Thisbe" play in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' as the CMOA for ''all of Shakespeare.'' Why? Well, we already know that Shakespeare's source material has suffered from serious AdaptationDisplacement over the years (RomeoAndJuliet weren't even his characters, but how many people could tell you that?) But in the time of Shakespeare, ''Pyramus and Thisbe'' were far from obscure--they were an ''extremely'' well-known pair of StarCrossedLovers, who even merited a mention in the "On such a night..." scene from ''TheMerchantOfVenice''. (Think of how lovers nowadays [[NarmCharm compare themselves to Romeo and Juliet]], and you've pretty much got the scene.) Now think about it this way. Imagine if a modern playwright wrote a play in which a couple of side characters were acting out ''Romeo and Juliet'' extremely badly for comedic purposes, and half a century later, ''Romeo and Juliet'' had faded into intellectual obscurity, and the ''only reason'' anyone even knew about the star-crossed lovers was because of their role in this playwright's ''incidental comedy routine.'' Not only could Shakespeare rewrite pretty much any old story in a way that was memorable enough to make it withstand the test of time, he could write a ''parody'' of one of the greatest legendary love stories ever written, and ''still'' have his version be the only reason the story is now a part of the public consciousness at all. Not to mention that what starts out as a madcap, loving parody of theatrics in Shakespeare's day turns out (via Theseus, Quince and Puck) to be a heartfelt plea to the audience to accept the play for what it is, the actors for who and what they are, and to understand that everyone on stage is trying as hard as they can to make them happy. Say all you will about the "Speak the speech" stuff from ''{{Hamlet}}'' (which ''is'' incredible, don't get me wrong), but I think Shakespeare's thoughts on theater were never written out more clearly or more movingly.
1st Jun '12 4:48:06 PM TastySauce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* I would like to nominate the "Pyramus and Thisbe" play in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' as the CMOA for ''all of Shakespeare.'' Why? Well, we already know that Shakespeare's source material has suffered from serious AdaptationDisplacement over the years (RomeoAndJuliet weren't even his characters, but how many people could tell you that?) But in the time of Shakespeare, ''Pyramus and Thisbe'' were far from obscure--they were an ''extremely'' well-known pair of StarCrossedLovers, who even merited a mention in the "On such a night..." scene from ''TheMerchantOfVenice''. (Think of how lovers nowadays [[NarmCharm compare themselves to Romeo and Juliet]], and you've pretty much got the scene.) Now think about it this way. Imagine if a modern playwright wrote a play in which a couple of side characters were acting out ''Romeo and Juliet'' extremely badly for comedic purposes, and half a century later, ''Romeo and Juliet'' had faded into intellectual obscurity, and the ''only reason'' anyone even knew about the star-crossed lovers was because of their role in this playwright's ''incidental comedy routine.'' Not only could Shakespeare rewrite pretty much any old story in a way that was memorable enough to make it withstand the test of time, he could write a ''parody'' of one of the greatest legendary love stories ever written, and ''still'' have his version be the only reason the story is now a part of the public consciousness at all. Not to mention that what starts out as a madcap, loving parody of theatrics in Shakespeare's day turns out (via Theseus, Quince and Puck) to be a heartfelt plea to the audience to accept the play for what it is, the actors for who and what they are, and to understand that everyone on stage is trying as hard as they can to make them happy. Say all you will about the "Speak the speech" stuff from ''{{Hamlet}}'' (which ''is'' incredible, don't get me wrong), but I think Shakespeare's thoughts on theater were never written out more clearly or more movingly.

to:

* I would like to nominate the "Pyramus and Thisbe" play in ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' as the CMOA for ''all of Shakespeare.'' Why? Well, we already know that Shakespeare's source material has suffered from serious AdaptationDisplacement over the years (RomeoAndJuliet weren't even his characters, but how many people could tell you that?) But in the time of Shakespeare, ''Pyramus and Thisbe'' were far from obscure--they were an ''extremely'' well-known pair of StarCrossedLovers, who even merited a mention in the "On such a night..." scene from ''TheMerchantOfVenice''. (Think of how lovers nowadays [[NarmCharm compare themselves to Romeo and Juliet]], and you've pretty much got the scene.) Now think about it this way. Imagine if a modern playwright wrote a play in which a couple of side characters were acting out ''Romeo and Juliet'' extremely badly for comedic purposes, and half a century later, ''Romeo and Juliet'' had faded into intellectual obscurity, and the ''only reason'' anyone even knew about the star-crossed lovers was because of their role in this playwright's ''incidental comedy routine.'' Not only could Shakespeare rewrite pretty much any old story in a way that was memorable enough to make it withstand the test of time, he could write a ''parody'' of one of the greatest legendary love stories ever written, and ''still'' have his version be the only reason the story is now a part of the public consciousness at all. Not to mention that what starts out as a madcap, loving parody of theatrics in Shakespeare's day turns out (via Theseus, Quince and Puck) to be a heartfelt plea to the audience to accept the play for what it is, the actors for who and what they are, and to understand that everyone on stage is trying as hard as they can to make them happy. Say all you will about the "Speak the speech" stuff from ''{{Hamlet}}'' (which ''is'' incredible, don't get me wrong), but I think Shakespeare's thoughts on theater were never written out more clearly or more movingly.movingly.

-----
22nd Nov '11 12:52:33 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%%* Awesome/AllsWellThatEndsWell

to:

%%* * Awesome/AllsWellThatEndsWell



%%* Awesome/{{Hamlet}}

to:

%%* * Awesome/{{Hamlet}}



%%* Awesome/HenryV

to:

%%* * Awesome/HenryV



%%* Awesome/KingJohn
%%* Awesome/KingLear

to:

%%* * Awesome/KingJohn
%%* * Awesome/KingLear
22nd Nov '11 12:37:39 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[index]]
%%* Awesome/AllsWellThatEndsWell
%%* Awesome/AntonyAndCleopatra
%%* Awesome/AsYouLikeIt
%%* Awesome/TheComedyOfErrors
%%* Awesome/{{Coriolanus}}
%%* Awesome/{{Cymbeline}}
%%* Awesome/{{Hamlet}}
%%* Awesome/HenryIVPart1
%%* Awesome/HenryIVPart2
%%* Awesome/HenryV
%%* Awesome/HenryVIPart1
%%* Awesome/HenryVIPart2
%%* Awesome/HenryVIPart3
%%* Awesome/HenryVIII
* Awesome/JuliusCaesar
%%* Awesome/KingJohn
%%* Awesome/KingLear
%%* Awesome/LovesLaboursLost
* Awesome/{{Macbeth}}
* Awesome/MeasureForMeasure
* Awesome/TheMerchantOfVenice
%%* Awesome/TheMerryWivesOfWindsor
%%* Awesome/AMidsummerNightsDream
* Awesome/MuchAdoAboutNothing
%%* Awesome/{{Othello}}
%%* Awesome/PericlesPrinceOfTyre
%%* Awesome/RichardII
* Awesome/RichardIII
* Awesome/RomeoAndJuliet
%%* Awesome/TheTamingOfTheShrew
%%* Awesome/TheTempest
%%* Awesome/TimonOfAthens
%%* Awesome/TitusAndronicus
%%* Awesome/TroilusAndCressida
%%* Awesome/TwelfthNight
%%* Awesome/TwoGentlemenOfVerona
%%* Awesome/TheTwoNobleKinsmen
%%* Awesome/TheWintersTale
[[/index]]
----
This list shows the last 6 events of 6. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Awesome.WilliamShakespeare