History ArtifactTitle / VideoGames

23rd Feb '17 9:30:05 PM RacattackForce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series can sometimes dabble into this trope, as there are games where Zelda either never appears (she's absent in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening Link's Awakening]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes Tri Force Heroes]]'' or only cameos in (''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' and the linked ending of the ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle games]]''). However, she is still very much a central character to the series overall -- moreso after TheReveal in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]'' had us learn that not only does every incarnation of Zelda hold the wisdom of the Triforce, but they also are [[spoiler:reincarnations of the chief goddess Hylia]].

to:

* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series can sometimes dabble into this trope, as there are games where Zelda either never appears (she's absent in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening (''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening Link's Awakening]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes Tri Force Heroes]]'' Heroes]]'') or only cameos in (''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' and the linked ending of the ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle games]]''). However, she is still very much a central character to the series overall -- moreso after TheReveal in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]'' had us learn that not only does every incarnation of Zelda hold the wisdom of the Triforce, but they also are [[spoiler:reincarnations of the chief goddess Hylia]].
23rd Feb '17 9:19:10 PM RacattackForce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series can sometimes dabble into this trope, as there are games where Zelda has little to no role in the story (She's absent in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening Link's Awakening]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes Tri Force Heroes]]'' and has only a cameo in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' ). However, she is still very much a central character to the series overall, more so after TheReveal in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]''.

to:

* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series can sometimes dabble into this trope, as there are games where Zelda has little to no role in the story (She's either never appears (she's absent in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening Link's Awakening]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes Tri Force Heroes]]'' and has or only a cameo cameos in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask (''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' ). and the linked ending of the ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle games]]''). However, she is still very much a central character to the series overall, more so overall -- moreso after TheReveal in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword Skyward Sword]]''.Sword]]'' had us learn that not only does every incarnation of Zelda hold the wisdom of the Triforce, but they also are [[spoiler:reincarnations of the chief goddess Hylia]].
17th Feb '17 11:23:13 AM Xlsfd
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Additionally, the Four Guardians of Neo Arcadia (Harpuia, Leviathan, Fefnir and Phantom) are reduced to three members after Phantom's death in the first game. However, in Mega Man Zero 2 and 3, they still refer to themselves/are referred to as the "Four Guardians".
25th Jan '17 10:52:37 PM MyFinalEdits
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' series. The title tournament hasn't actually been held since the second game in the series. To be fair, spelling aside, the games still are arguably about "Mortal Kombat" in concept if not in reference to the tournament.

to:

* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' series. The title tournament hasn't actually been held since the second game in the series. To be fair, spelling aside, the games still are arguably about "Mortal Kombat" in concept if not in reference to the tournament.



* The ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' games have plenty of fighting, but most of the stages aren't actually set in streets at all. [[Film/StreetFighter The movie]], on the other hand, doesn't have much fighting at all.
** In fact, ''very'' few of the martial artists in the series are truly "street fighters" by the very definition. The only real examples are Cody and Birdie. You could arguably include some or most of the transplants from the ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' series, honestly -- even Sodom's skills are self-taught and he works as an enforcer for a crime racket.
*** At least in the first game, the title more or less fit the premise. In it, a rootless warrior seeks battles with worthy opponents around the world strictly for the sake of the fight. Ryu hasn't changed much since then, but over the years, his simple story has been overshadowed by the great secret evil organization and soul transferences and memory loss and human cloning and DNA scarring and sinister agents with artificial body parts and Dark Hado and competing wrestling leagues and that ''other'' great secret evil organization etc. etc.
*** The ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha]]'' series, ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterIII Street Fighter III: Third Strike]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterIV Super Street Fighter IV]]'' are at least half-subversions as well. While the aforementioned evil organizations were at the center of the plot, there was no actual tournament going on (in the case of the ''3S'', the tournament had mostly wrapped up by the time ''2nd Impact'' ended/''3rd Strike'' began, whereas ''SSFIV'' is simultaneously set during ''IV''[='s=] tournament and right after its close); the various cast members were simply touring the world and challenging each other to fights basically everywhere while attempting to get to the bottom of it all.

to:

* ''Franchise/StreetFighter'':
**
The ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' games games have plenty of fighting, but most of the stages aren't actually set in streets at all. [[Film/StreetFighter The movie]], on the other hand, doesn't have much fighting at all.
** In fact,
all. And ''very'' few of the martial artists in the series are truly "street fighters" by the very definition. The only real examples are Cody and Birdie. You could arguably include some or most of the transplants from the ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' series, honestly -- even Sodom's skills are self-taught and he works as an enforcer for a crime racket.
*** At least in the first game, the title more or less fit the premise. In it, a rootless warrior seeks battles with worthy opponents around the world strictly for the sake of the fight. Ryu hasn't changed much since then, but over the years, his simple story has been overshadowed by the great secret evil organization and soul transferences and memory loss and human cloning and DNA scarring and sinister agents with artificial body parts and Dark Hado and competing wrestling leagues and that ''other'' great secret evil organization etc. etc.
***
Birdie.
**
The ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha]]'' series, ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterIII Street Fighter III: Third Strike]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterIV Super Street Fighter IV]]'' are at least half-subversions as well. IV]]''. While the aforementioned evil organizations were at the center of the plot, there was no actual tournament going on (in the case of the ''3S'', the tournament had mostly wrapped up by the time ''2nd Impact'' ended/''3rd Strike'' began, whereas ''SSFIV'' is simultaneously set during ''IV''[='s=] tournament and right after its close); the various cast members were simply touring the world and challenging each other to fights basically everywhere while attempting to get to the bottom of it all.



* This almost occurred in the NES version of ''VideoGame/{{Double Dragon|I}}'', but the developers managed to work around it. The original arcade version allowed up to two players simultaneously, taking control of twin martial artists named Billy and Jimmy Lee (hence the game's title). When working on the NES version, the programmers were unable to adapt the arcade's two-player co-op mode. Since the title wouldn't have made much sense with just one of the Lee brothers, the other one now appears as the final boss after Machine Gun Willy, the final boss from the arcade version, is defeated.

to:

* This almost occurred in the NES version of ''VideoGame/{{Double Dragon|I}}'', but the developers managed to work around it. it.
**
The original arcade version allowed up to two players simultaneously, taking control of twin martial artists named Billy and Jimmy Lee (hence the game's title). When working on the NES version, the programmers were unable to adapt the arcade's two-player co-op mode. Since the title wouldn't have made much sense with just one of the Lee brothers, the other one now appears as the final boss after Machine Gun Willy, the final boss from the arcade version, is defeated.



* ''VideoGame/AloneInTheDark2008'': you're not alone, and it's not dark ([[IncendiaryExponent because everything is on fire]]).
** Made especially ironic because the fire physics are the best part of the game. Subverted slightly (but no less ironically) when an upgraded version was given the subtitle ''Inferno''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AloneInTheDark2008'': you're not alone, and it's not dark ([[IncendiaryExponent because everything is on fire]]).
**
fire]]). Made especially ironic because the fire physics are the best part of the game. Subverted slightly (but no less ironically) when an upgraded version was given the subtitle ''Inferno''.



* The ''Videogame/{{MOTHER}}'' series has an odd relationship with this trope:
** The Japanese title of the first game, ''[[Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings MOTHER]]'', refers to the fact that [[spoiler:the protagonist's grandmother, Maria, [[ParentalSubstitute raised the the main villain of the game]], [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Giegue]], from infancy, and the lullaby she used to sing him is what allows the protagonist's party to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas repel Giegue's]] AlienInvasion at the end of the game.]] But then the sort-of sequel[[note]]The game takes place in a different setting with different characters, but features the same villain[[/note]], ''[[Videogame/EarthBound MOTHER 2]]'', lacks an important central mother figure, playing this trope straight. The third game, ''Videogame/MOTHER3,'' averts it, with [[spoiler: the spirit of Hinawa, the mother of the protagonist and his BrainwashedAndCrazy twin brother, being instrumental in the final battle.]] This was averted with the localized names of the first two games, ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings'' and ''Videogame/EarthBound'', respectively.

to:

* The ''Videogame/{{MOTHER}}'' series has an odd relationship with this trope:
**
trope: The Japanese title of the first game, ''[[Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings MOTHER]]'', refers to the fact that [[spoiler:the protagonist's grandmother, Maria, [[ParentalSubstitute raised the the main villain of the game]], [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Giegue]], from infancy, and the lullaby she used to sing him is what allows the protagonist's party to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas repel Giegue's]] AlienInvasion at the end of the game.]] But then the sort-of sequel[[note]]The game takes place in a different setting with different characters, but features the same villain[[/note]], ''[[Videogame/EarthBound MOTHER 2]]'', lacks an important central mother figure, playing this trope straight. The third game, ''Videogame/MOTHER3,'' averts it, with [[spoiler: the spirit of Hinawa, the mother of the protagonist and his BrainwashedAndCrazy twin brother, being instrumental in the final battle.]] This was averted with the localized names of the first two games, ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings'' and ''Videogame/EarthBound'', respectively.
25th Jan '17 9:40:41 PM ILikeRobots
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Japanese title of the first game, ''[[Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings MOTHER]]'', refers to the fact that [[spoiler:the protagonist's grandmother, Maria, [[ParentalSubstitute raised the the main villain of the game]], [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Giegue]], from infancy, and the lullaby she used to sing him is what allows the protagonist's party to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas repel Giegue's]] AlienInvasion at the end of the game.]] But then the sort-of sequel[[note]]The game takes place in a different setting with different characters, but features the same villain[[/note]], ''[[Videogame/EarthBound MOTHER 2]]'', lacks an important central mother figure, playing this trope straight. The third game, ''Videogame/MOTHER3,'' averts it, with [[spoiler: Hinawa, the mother of the protagonist and his BrainwashedAndCrazy twin brother, being instrumental in the final battle.]] This was averted with the localized names of the first two games, ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings'' and ''Videogame/EarthBound'', respectively.

to:

** The Japanese title of the first game, ''[[Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings MOTHER]]'', refers to the fact that [[spoiler:the protagonist's grandmother, Maria, [[ParentalSubstitute raised the the main villain of the game]], [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Giegue]], from infancy, and the lullaby she used to sing him is what allows the protagonist's party to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas repel Giegue's]] AlienInvasion at the end of the game.]] But then the sort-of sequel[[note]]The game takes place in a different setting with different characters, but features the same villain[[/note]], ''[[Videogame/EarthBound MOTHER 2]]'', lacks an important central mother figure, playing this trope straight. The third game, ''Videogame/MOTHER3,'' averts it, with [[spoiler: the spirit of Hinawa, the mother of the protagonist and his BrainwashedAndCrazy twin brother, being instrumental in the final battle.]] This was averted with the localized names of the first two games, ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings'' and ''Videogame/EarthBound'', respectively.
25th Jan '17 2:07:38 PM ILikeRobots
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The ''Videogame/{{MOTHER}}'' series has an odd relationship with this trope:
** The Japanese title of the first game, ''[[Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings MOTHER]]'', refers to the fact that [[spoiler:the protagonist's grandmother, Maria, [[ParentalSubstitute raised the the main villain of the game]], [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Giegue]], from infancy, and the lullaby she used to sing him is what allows the protagonist's party to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas repel Giegue's]] AlienInvasion at the end of the game.]] But then the sort-of sequel[[note]]The game takes place in a different setting with different characters, but features the same villain[[/note]], ''[[Videogame/EarthBound MOTHER 2]]'', lacks an important central mother figure, playing this trope straight. The third game, ''Videogame/MOTHER3,'' averts it, with [[spoiler: Hinawa, the mother of the protagonist and his BrainwashedAndCrazy twin brother, being instrumental in the final battle.]] This was averted with the localized names of the first two games, ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings'' and ''Videogame/EarthBound'', respectively.
20th Dec '16 3:30:18 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead'' was named as such because it took place in a mansion. Naturally, none of the sequels feature said mansion though the first stage in ''[[VideoGame/TheHouseOfTheDeadOverkill Overkill]]'' takes place in ''a'' mansion. Inverted with ''VideoGame/ZombieRevenge'', where one level is called "The House of the Dead" and actually takes place in ''The House of the Dead''[='s=] Curien mansion.
* On a similar note to ''House of the Dead'', due to copyright issues with the original title of ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' (''Biohazard''), the dev team came up with the former as a reference to the mansion that [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil1 the first game]] was set in. Also like ''HOTD'', later games in the series are not set in a mansion, with the exceptions of the Ashfords' mansion and the replica of the Spencer mansion in ''Code: Veronica'' and the Umbrella Training Facility in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'' (the game starts out on a train). The Japanese title, ''Biohazard'', references the viruses that drives the plot.

to:

* ''The VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead'' was named as such because it took place in a mansion. Naturally, none of the sequels feature said mansion though the first stage in ''[[VideoGame/TheHouseOfTheDeadOverkill Overkill]]'' takes place in ''a'' mansion. Moreover, a number of other stages in ''Overkill'' take place in metaphorical houses (e.g. the fun house [Carny], the big house [Jailhouse Judgement]), although the enemies aren't actually dead. Inverted with ''VideoGame/ZombieRevenge'', where one level is called "The House of the Dead" and actually takes place in ''The House of the Dead''[='s=] Curien mansion.
* On a similar note to ''House of the Dead'', due to copyright issues with the original title of ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' (''Biohazard''), the dev team came up with the former as a reference to the mansion that [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil1 the first game]] was set in. Also like ''HOTD'', later games in the series are not set in a mansion, with the exceptions of the Ashfords' mansion and the replica of the Spencer mansion in ''Code: Veronica'' and the Umbrella Training Facility in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'' (the game starts out on a train). The Japanese title, ''Biohazard'', references the viruses that drives drive the plot.
5th Dec '16 5:02:52 PM BigKlingy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]'', as well as the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius saga]], the Fire Emblem is merely an alternate title of the MacGuffin, while most people refer to it by other names (the Sacred Stone of Grado and Lehran's Medallion, respectively).

to:

** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]'', as well as the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius saga]], the Fire Emblem is merely an alternate title of the MacGuffin, while most people refer to it by other names (the Sacred Stone of Grado and Lehran's Medallion, respectively). In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', the MacGuffin exists on all routes but is only called the "Fire Emblem" on ''Revelation'', making ''Birthright'' and ''Conquest'' fall into this trope.
5th Nov '16 12:00:40 AM shigmiya64
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/JediKnightIIJediOutcast''[='=]s refers to Kyle no longer being a Jedi, but is erroneous for two reasons - one, Kyle wasn't forced out of the Order like the title implies (he left of his own free will, afraid of falling to the dark side again like he did in ''Mysteries of the Sith''). Two, you only play two levels before he becomes a Jedi again.
26th Oct '16 12:04:12 PM SolidSonicTH
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''The VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead'' was named as such because it took place in a mansion. Naturally, none of the sequels feature said mansion though the first stage in ''[[VideoGame/TheHouseOfTheDeadOverkill Overkill]]'' takes place in ''a'' mansion.

to:

* ''The VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead'' was named as such because it took place in a mansion. Naturally, none of the sequels feature said mansion though the first stage in ''[[VideoGame/TheHouseOfTheDeadOverkill Overkill]]'' takes place in ''a'' mansion. Inverted with ''VideoGame/ZombieRevenge'', where one level is called "The House of the Dead" and actually takes place in ''The House of the Dead''[='s=] Curien mansion.
This list shows the last 10 events of 177. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ArtifactTitle.VideoGames