History Anime / PatLabor

25th Sep '16 5:57:10 AM kirara19
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* AceCustom: Even though the Ingrams are considered prototypes, the Labor operating systems work by "learning" the most effective movements of its pilots, customizing their functions. Visibly, all continuities give the three units different head designs after the first OVA.



* BeachEpisode: The TV series, episode 40. Altohugh it's the last scene of the episode that treats the viewer with a view of the team enjoying beach games and suntanning.

to:

* BeachEpisode: The TV series, episode 40. Altohugh Although it's the last scene of the episode that treats the viewer with a view of the team enjoying beach games and suntanning.



** The mecha are rarely over a dozen meters tall, so as not to crush their own feet. And one tripping will still take out a house. They don't even walk long distances, since they're stored at construction sites like any other piece of heavy equipment, and the Patlabors are transported to combat scenes in their own specialized trucks.

to:

** The mecha mechas are rarely over a dozen meters tall, so as not to crush their own feet. And one tripping will still take out a house. They don't even walk long distances, since they're stored at construction sites like any other piece of heavy equipment, and the Patlabors are transported to combat scenes in their own specialized trucks.



** The fourth and 19th episodes of the TV series feature different monsters. The first is a mammal of some sort, a genetic experiment that escaped, and the audience only catches a brief sight of it -- it's [[TheCameo a cameo]] of Mughi from "LightNovel/DirtyPair". In episode 19, the monster is an underground-adapted [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragon]], which Noa insists on calling it a real Kaiju, while Kanuka [[HypocriticalHumor insists on calling it a surviving Dragon]] descended from the ones in the middle ages.

to:

** The fourth and 19th episodes of the TV series feature different monsters. The first is a mammal of some sort, a genetic experiment that escaped, and the audience only catches a brief sight of it -- it's an animation [[TheCameo a cameo]] of Mughi from "LightNovel/DirtyPair".''LightNovel/DirtyPair''[='=] Mughi. In episode 19, the monster is an underground-adapted [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragon]], which Noa insists on calling it a real Kaiju, while Kanuka [[HypocriticalHumor insists on calling it a surviving Dragon]] descended from the ones in the middle ages.



** [=SV2=] has three prototype AV-98 Ingram mechs. One episode of the series focused on the introduction of a mass-produced line of Ingrams, subverting the trope a bit in that the prototypes weren't exceptionally good so much as the mass-produced ones were exceptionally shoddy. Also, other kinds of mass-produced military mechs are shown to be close in quality to the Ingrams, if not flat out ''better'' in certain regards, but the Ingram has a distinct lead in agility and the experience of its pilots.
*** Shinohara Heavy Industries is actually GenreSavvy about this trope. After the poor showing their first massproduction Ingram makes, they get [=SV2=] to help them develop a new one. The resulting Economy Model Ingram mk. II is actually superior in some respects to the original AV-98.
*** Interestingly, given that Labor operating systems work by "learning" the most effective movements of its pilots, the Ingrams can also count as [[AceCustom Ace Customs]] as well. Visibly, all continuities give the three units different head designs after the first OVA.

to:

** [=SV2=] has three prototype AV-98 Ingram mechs. One episode of the series focused on the introduction of a mass-produced line of Ingrams, subverting the trope a bit in that the prototypes weren't exceptionally good so much as the mass-produced ones were exceptionally shoddy. Also, other kinds of mass-produced military mechs are shown to be close in quality to the Ingrams, if not flat out ''better'' in certain regards, but the Ingram has a distinct lead in agility and the experience of its pilots.
*** Shinohara Heavy Industries is actually GenreSavvy about this trope. After the poor showing their first massproduction Ingram makes, they get [=SV2=] to help them develop a new one. The resulting Economy "Economy Model Ingram mk. II II" is actually superior in some respects to the original AV-98.
*** Interestingly, given that Labor operating systems work by "learning" the most effective movements of its pilots, the Ingrams can also count as [[AceCustom Ace Customs]] as well. Visibly, all continuities give the three units different head designs after the first OVA.
AV-98.



* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: The franchise started in 1988, but was set in 1998. Aside from understimating the leap in technology, they got just about everything else right.

to:

* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: The franchise started in 1988, but was set in 1998. Aside from understimating underestimating the leap in technology, they got just about everything else right.
25th Sep '16 5:41:24 AM kirara19
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* Asuma Shinohara, the dispossessed heir to a mecha construction company and Noa's "backup" (this is the English term used in the series--with Noa being the "forward"--although his role would be better described as "spotter", or possibly "field commander", as there is an implication of the backup being a superior officer).

to:

* Asuma Shinohara, the dispossessed heir to a mecha construction company and Noa's "backup" (this is the English term used in the series--with Noa being the "forward"--although "forward" -- although his role would be better described as "spotter", or possibly "field commander", as there is an implication of the backup being a superior officer).



!!''Patlabor'' provides example of the following tropes:

to:

!!''Patlabor'' provides example examples of the following tropes:



* ArentYouGoingToRavishMe: Noa was apparently expecting this from Asuma in the ninth episode: "Red Labor Landing".
** In context, they end up having to share a hotel room while on assignment. Noa waits until she thinks he's asleep before cautiously entering the room to turn in. When Asuma suddenly "awakes" and creeps toward her futon, she's clearly expecting to be groped and braces herself for the inevitable... except he completely ignores her and [[FunnyMoments goes for her snack bag.]] Noa becomes outraged and clocks him.

to:

* ArentYouGoingToRavishMe: Noa was apparently ''apparently'' expecting this from Asuma in the ninth episode: "Red Labor Landing".
** In context,
Landing", as they end up having to share a hotel room while on assignment. Noa waits until she thinks he's asleep before cautiously entering the room to turn in. When Asuma suddenly "awakes" and creeps toward her futon, she's clearly expecting to be groped and braces herself for the inevitable... except he completely ignores her and [[FunnyMoments goes for her snack bag.]] bag. Noa becomes outraged and clocks him.



* ArsonMurderAndLifeSaving
* AsTheGoodBookSays: The first movie.
* BadassAdorable: Noa

to:

* %%* ArsonMurderAndLifeSaving
* %%* AsTheGoodBookSays: The first movie.
* %%* BadassAdorable: Noa



* BattleDiscretionShot: In ''Patlabor 2'' after shooting their way past the robot tanks in the tunnels, Nagumo enters an elevator in her labor [[OhCrap only to find another robot tank about to open fire at point-blank range]]. Nagumo stomps towards it screaming, "GET OUT OF MY WAY!" Cut to the elevator rising to the surface carrying Nagumo's totaled labor, whereupon she hits the eject and walks the rest of the way.
* BeachEpisode: The TV series, episode 40. Kinda subverted as only the last scene of the episode treats us with a view of the team enjoying beach games, suntanning,...
* BerserkButton: Word to the wise - ''do not insult Shinshi's wife''.
** Also somewhat applies to Izumi when Alphonse (her Labor) is damaged.
** Even though Ohta is a living, breathing BerserkButton himself, it's worth mentioning that he really, ''really'' hates when someone disrespects the police; this applies to his patrol partners as well, and it's the reason why him and Shinohara are constantly at each other's throats.

to:

* BattleDiscretionShot: In ''Patlabor 2'' 2'', after shooting their way past the robot tanks in the tunnels, Nagumo enters an elevator in her labor [[OhCrap only to find another robot tank about to open fire at point-blank range]]. Nagumo stomps towards it screaming, "GET OUT OF MY WAY!" Cut to the elevator rising to the surface carrying Nagumo's totaled labor, whereupon she hits the eject and walks the rest of the way.
* BeachEpisode: The TV series, episode 40. Kinda subverted as only Altohugh it's the last scene of the episode that treats us the viewer with a view of the team enjoying beach games, suntanning,...
games and suntanning.
* BerserkButton: BerserkButton:
**
Word to the wise - ''do not insult Shinshi's wife''.
** Also somewhat applies to Izumi when Every time Alphonse (her Labor) gets damaged, Noa is damaged.
not going to be happy about it.
** Even though Ohta is a living, breathing BerserkButton himself, it's worth mentioning that he really, ''really'' hates when someone disrespects the police; this police. This applies to his patrol partners as well, and it's the reason why him and Shinohara are constantly at each other's throats.



** The big guns aren't restricted to labors; Hiromi gets to use (hesitantly) a 20mm anti-materiel sniper rifle in the first & second films.
*** For that matter, on the Griffon arc, Hiromi and Ohta are able to squeeze a single shot to the Griffon Labor while they have Ohta's Ingram's gun mounted at the top of the Command Car. It levels the playing field between Alphonse and Griffon by wasting the latter's monitors. Tremendously impractical, true, and it ends up injuring Hiromi... but it was totally worth the trouble!

to:

** The big guns aren't restricted to labors; labors, as Hiromi gets to use (hesitantly) a 20mm anti-materiel sniper rifle in the first & second films.
***
films. For that matter, on the Griffon arc, Hiromi and Ohta are able to squeeze a single shot to the Griffon Labor while they have Ohta's Ingram's gun mounted at the top of the Command Car. It levels the playing field between Alphonse and Griffon by wasting the latter's monitors. Tremendously impractical, true, and it ends up injuring Hiromi... but it was totally worth the trouble!



* BreakingTheFourthWall: This happens at several points in the manga:

to:

* BreakingTheFourthWall: This happens at several points in the manga:manga --



* ButNotTooForeign: Lt. Clancy.

to:

* ButNotTooForeign: Lt. Clancy.Clancy, who is half-Japanese and half-American.



* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Schaft Enterprises is a ruthless corporation that produces military mecha, among other things, and use highly illegal means to test their vehicles. An odd case, in that it remains a monolithic entity with no BigBad in charge of it, though their agents Kurosaki and Richard Wong/Utsumi give it a human face.
** Yeah, you know they say that those cats at Schaft are some bad Mother-
** Schaft even has its own private army of mercenaries that operates in a great part of Southeast Asia.

to:

* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Schaft Enterprises is a ruthless corporation that produces military mecha, among other things, and use uses highly illegal means to test their vehicles. An odd case, in that it remains a monolithic entity with no BigBad in charge of it, though their agents Kurosaki and Richard Wong/Utsumi give it a human face.
** Yeah, you know they say that those cats at Schaft are some bad Mother-
**
face. Schaft even has its own private army of mercenaries that operates in a great part of Southeast Asia.



* CrossPoppingVeins: Ohta, mostly.
* DarkerAndEdgier: Every one of the movies gets progressively darker than the last but surprisingly enough the first two are really low on violence and serve more as psychological thrillers. However, the third movie got away with some rather gruesome deaths and a gloomier mood.

to:

* %%* CrossPoppingVeins: Ohta, mostly.
* DarkerAndEdgier: DarkerAndEdgier:
**
Every one of the movies gets progressively darker than the last but surprisingly enough the first two are really low on violence and serve more as psychological thrillers. However, the third movie got away with some rather gruesome deaths and a gloomier mood.



* DayInTheLife

to:

* %%* DayInTheLife



** They're rarely over a dozen meters tall, so as not to crush their own feet. And one tripping will still take out a house. They don't even walk long distances; they're stored at construction sites like any other piece of heavy equipment, and the Patlabors are transported to combat scenes in their own specialized trucks.
** FallingIntoTheCockpit is impossible as they're complicated as hell; Noa teaching her mech to tie a shoelace knot is considered proof of her being a genius pilot. Most people can't do much with even a SuperPrototype robot even if they find themselves piloting one.
** Weapons are scaled-up versions of conventional firearms; a laser shows up in a single two-part episode, but never seen again - it destroyed all its foes, but it was ''[[AwesomeButImpractical too delicate and expensive]].''
** WarForFunAndProfit is neither fun nor profitable; Schaft Enterprises makes an attempt to pit one of their military prototypes against the police's Ingram in pursuit of combat data. What followed was ridiculously stupid, as the only people they could find willing to do such a ridiculously stupid thing were some deadbeat stoner BombThrowingAnarchists - who fled the scene once they ''realized'' how ridiculously stupid the whole thing was.
*** Of course, the whole Griffon plotline, from Brocken fighting Ingram to collect its data to the Griffon itself, is HUGE Shout Out to [[Anime/{{Gigantor}} Tetsujin No. 28]]. Simply replace Brocken and Griffon with Baccus and Black Ox and the whole thing should be clearer.

to:

** They're The mecha are rarely over a dozen meters tall, so as not to crush their own feet. And one tripping will still take out a house. They don't even walk long distances; distances, since they're stored at construction sites like any other piece of heavy equipment, and the Patlabors are transported to combat scenes in their own specialized trucks.
** FallingIntoTheCockpit is impossible as they're complicated as hell; hell. Noa teaching her mech to tie a shoelace knot is considered proof of her being a genius pilot. Most people can't do much with even a SuperPrototype robot even if they find themselves piloting one.
** Weapons are scaled-up versions of conventional firearms; a firearms. A laser shows up in a single two-part episode, but never seen again - -- it destroyed all its foes, but it was ''[[AwesomeButImpractical too delicate and expensive]].''
** WarForFunAndProfit is neither fun nor profitable; profitable. Schaft Enterprises makes an attempt to pit one of their military prototypes against the police's Ingram in pursuit of combat data. What followed was ridiculously stupid, as the only people they could find willing to do such a ridiculously stupid thing were some deadbeat stoner BombThrowingAnarchists - -- who fled the scene once they ''realized'' how ridiculously stupid the whole thing was.
*** Of course, the whole Griffon plotline, from Brocken fighting Ingram to collect its data to the Griffon itself, is HUGE Shout Out to [[Anime/{{Gigantor}} Tetsujin No. 28]]. Simply replace Brocken and Griffon with Baccus and Black Ox and the whole thing should be clearer.
was.



* EasyLogistics: Subverted. The logistics woes affecting SV2 are so bad, Ingram Unit 3 is rarely deployed, because most of the time it's being cannibalised for spare parts.
** Worse, due to where Special Vehicles 2 is located, there are severe difficulties with feeding the maintenance staff. [[spoiler:Gotoh apparently came up with a solution, that frankly ''worries'' Nagumo about what he'd do if he didn't happen to be one of the good guys.]]
* EnergyWeapons: Only one Labor type ever uses one, and it's quickly abandoned by the corporation building them because they're too expensive and not as effective against cannons and good old-fashioned pummeling as they thought. There's some FridgeLogic here though, as they're shown to work just fine under certain conditions...
** But no better then a military grade cannon or missile really would have under similar conditions for probably a fraction of the price. It was likely deemed AwesomeButImpractical, as we only see it fighting the AV-98s.

to:

* EasyLogistics: Subverted. The logistics woes affecting SV2 [=SV2=] are so bad, Ingram Unit 3 is rarely deployed, because most of the time it's being cannibalised for spare parts.
** Worse,
parts. And due to where Special Vehicles 2 is located, there are severe difficulties with feeding the maintenance staff. [[spoiler:Gotoh apparently came up with a solution, that frankly ''worries'' Nagumo about what he'd do if he didn't happen to be one of the good guys.]]
* EnergyWeapons: Only one Labor type ever uses one, and it's quickly abandoned by the corporation building them because they're too expensive and not as effective against cannons and good old-fashioned pummeling as they thought. There's some FridgeLogic here though, as they're shown to work just fine under certain conditions...\n** But no better then a military grade cannon or missile really would have under similar conditions for probably a fraction of the price. It was likely deemed AwesomeButImpractical, as we only see it fighting the AV-98s.



* EveryCarIsAPinto: Played straight with cars, but averted with [[HumongousMecha Labors]], which require a self-destruct to explode.

to:

* EveryCarIsAPinto: EveryCarIsAPinto:
**
Played straight with cars, but averted with [[HumongousMecha Labors]], which require a self-destruct to explode.



* {{Expy}}: The members of Division 2 are very similar to the characters from ''Film/PoliceAcademy'' in various ways.
** A redheaded new recruit of an armored police division? Are we talking about [[Anime/DominionTankPolice Leona Ozaki]], or her future equivalent, Noa Izumi? Similarly, Noa fusses over her labor, Alphonse; just as Leona fawn over her tank, Bonaparte - though Leona's [[CargoShip WAAAYY more attached to her tank....]]
*** They also have the [[CastingGag same voice actress]] in the US dub of both shows.

to:

* {{Expy}}: {{Expy}}:
**
The members of Division 2 are very similar to the characters from ''Film/PoliceAcademy'' in various ways.
** A redheaded new recruit of an armored police division? Are we talking about [[Anime/DominionTankPolice Leona Ozaki]], or her future equivalent, Noa Izumi? Similarly, Noa fusses over her labor, Alphonse; Alphonse, just as Leona fawn over her tank, Bonaparte - -- though Leona's [[CargoShip WAAAYY more attached to her tank....]]
*** They also have the [[CastingGag same voice actress]] in the US dub of both shows.
tank...]]



* {{Facefault}}: CONSTANTLY.

to:

* %%* {{Facefault}}: CONSTANTLY.



* GatlingGood: The [=AH88=] Hellhound helicopters, Extor battle robots, & AL-97B Hannibal labors in the movies are all armed with 20mm rotary cannons.

to:

* GatlingGood: GatlingGood:
**
The [=AH88=] Hellhound helicopters, Extor battle robots, & AL-97B Hannibal labors in the movies are all armed with 20mm rotary cannons.



* GratuitousRussian: According to the translation and the Japanese subtitles, the Soviet labor pilot said "You Japs betrayed me", but in reality he said something like "Japanese No Hooray" or a tremendously mispronounced "Japanese nowhere" and continued to savagely violate the Russian language during the rest of the episode. [[note]]Averted with the English dub, where he speaks English.[[/note]]

to:

* GratuitousRussian: GratuitousRussian:
**
According to the translation and the Japanese subtitles, the Soviet labor pilot said "You Japs betrayed me", but in reality he said something like "Japanese No Hooray" or a tremendously mispronounced "Japanese nowhere" and continued to savagely violate the Russian language during the rest of the episode. [[note]]Averted with the English dub, where he speaks English.[[/note]]



* HardDrinkingPartyGirl: Noa and Lt. Clancy, though not "Party Girls" by any stretch of the imagination, can hold their liquor. In fact, the first time they start to bond is when they're both screaming drunk and drinking competitively. [[spoiler:Noa wins, by not having any hangover whatsoever the next day.]]
** There's also Lt. Kumagami. Kumagami and Clancy getting drunk together at the hot springs [[spoiler: and poor Ohta paying for it]] is classic.

to:

* HardDrinkingPartyGirl: HardDrinkingPartyGirl:
**
Noa and Lt. Clancy, though not "Party Girls" by any stretch of the imagination, can hold their liquor. In fact, the The first time they start to bond is when they're both screaming drunk and drinking competitively. [[spoiler:Noa wins, by not having any hangover whatsoever the next day.]]
** There's also Lt. Kumagami. Kumagami and Clancy getting drunk together at the hot springs [[spoiler: and poor Ohta paying for it]] is classic.



* IDontKnowMortalKombat: Izumi did badly on a Patlabor arcade game largely because she was too used to piloting a real HumongousMecha. The trope is very apt, amusingly, as the difference between the game (depicted only in the anime, as a 'hunt-and-kill' simulator) and Noa's job is about as big as the ''MortalKombat'' series and a UFC event.

to:

* IDontKnowMortalKombat: Izumi did badly on a Patlabor ''Patlabor'' arcade game largely because she was too used to piloting a real HumongousMecha. The trope is very apt, amusingly, as the difference between the game (depicted only in the anime, as a 'hunt-and-kill' simulator) and Noa's job is about as big as the ''MortalKombat'' series and a UFC event.



* {{Kaiju}}: Subverted in episode 3 of the first OVA series, where [[spoiler:the monster walks off into the sea immediately after it appears]]. It has an appearance similar to Garia from ''Film/WarOfTheGargantuas'' ...and Hiromi Yamizaki. Other examples are played straight: The fourth and 19th episodes of the TV series feature different monsters as well. The first is a mammal of some sort--an escaped genetic experiment. Some think it looks like a bear, others like a cat or raccoon-dog. The Audience never sees it though.[[note]]Actually we do, briefly, and it's Mughi from "LightNovel/DirtyPair" (which shared staff with Patlabor).[[/note]], In 19, the monster is an underground-adapted [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragon]]. Izumi insists on calling it a real Kaiju. Kanuka calls that a childish fantasy--and [[HypocriticalHumor insists on calling it a surviving Dragon]] [[WildMassGuessing descended from the ones in the middle ages]].
** The manga contains a different {{Kaiju}} story that doesn't appear in the anime, involving an airline crash that accidentally releases a genetic experiment that rapidly grows into an amphibious monster that Division 2 -- among others -- get called out to deal with.

to:

* {{Kaiju}}: {{Kaiju}}:
**
Subverted in episode 3 of the first OVA series, where [[spoiler:the monster walks off into the sea immediately after it appears]]. It has an appearance similar to Garia from ''Film/WarOfTheGargantuas'' ...and Hiromi Yamizaki. Other examples are played straight:
**
The fourth and 19th episodes of the TV series feature different monsters as well. monsters. The first is a mammal of some sort--an escaped sort, a genetic experiment. Some think it looks like a bear, others like a cat or raccoon-dog. The Audience never sees it though.[[note]]Actually we do, briefly, experiment that escaped, and the audience only catches a brief sight of it -- it's [[TheCameo a cameo]] of Mughi from "LightNovel/DirtyPair" (which shared staff with Patlabor).[[/note]], "LightNovel/DirtyPair". In episode 19, the monster is an underground-adapted [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragon]]. Izumi Dragon]], which Noa insists on calling it a real Kaiju. Kaiju, while Kanuka calls that a childish fantasy--and [[HypocriticalHumor insists on calling it a surviving Dragon]] [[WildMassGuessing descended from the ones in the middle ages]].
ages.
** The manga contains a different {{Kaiju}} story that doesn't appear in the anime, involving involves an airline crash that accidentally releases a genetic experiment that rapidly grows into an amphibious monster that Division 2 -- among others -- (among others) get called out to deal with.



* MechaShow: Basically the first of a rare sub-genre, that of civilian-owned and operated mecha ''not'' largely used for combat.

to:

* MechaShow: Basically ''Patlabor'' is the first of a rare sub-genre, that of civilian-owned and operated mecha ''not'' largely used for combat.



* ObfuscatingStupidity: Richard Wong/Mr. Utsumi, the cold and calculating agent of Schaft Enterprises, hides behind a happy-go-lucky facade. (Mind, he actually ''is'' that happy-go-lucky under most circumstances - he just ''stays'' that way as he calmly orchestrates a calamity.)

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidity: Richard Wong/Mr. Utsumi, the cold and calculating agent of Schaft Enterprises, hides behind a happy-go-lucky facade. (Mind, he actually ''is'' that happy-go-lucky under most circumstances - -- he just ''stays'' that way as he calmly orchestrates a calamity.)



* OtakuSurrogate: Noah is a bit of a borderline example. She's obsessed with giant robots, but in a very girly way. She seems to be working her way out of it by the time of the second movie.

to:

* OtakuSurrogate: Noah Noa is a bit of a borderline example. She's example as she's obsessed with giant robots, but in a very girly way. She seems to be working her way out of it by the time of the second movie.



* ParanormalEpisode: The anime is, at its heart, a SliceOfLife, [[CopShow Cop Show]]/[[PoliceProcedural Police Procedural]], with HumongousMecha. But, during the 27th episode of the TV series, the [=SVU2=] encounter ghosts, while holding indoor training execrcises in an abandoned building. It turns out that the ghosts were [[spoiler: the spirits of earthquake victims, who once lived there. Their spirits couldn't rest because of an undiscovered burial site, which contained the remains of slain samurai, directly beneath the building [=SVU2=] was training in.]] The spirits were lain to rest, once it was discovered, and rites were performed on the site.
* PhenotypeStereotype: In the New York city dream, most of the characters who appear are blond haired, blue eyed versions of the core cast--with a few exceptions--as is everyone else in New York City. They're also all [[GunNut gun crazy]]. ''All'' of them.

to:

* ParanormalEpisode: The anime is, at its heart, a SliceOfLife, [[CopShow Cop Show]]/[[PoliceProcedural Police Procedural]], CopShow[=/=]PoliceProcedural, with HumongousMecha. But, during the 27th episode of the TV series, the [=SVU2=] encounter ghosts, while holding indoor training execrcises in an abandoned building. It turns out that the ghosts were [[spoiler: the spirits of earthquake victims, who once lived there. Their spirits couldn't rest because of an undiscovered burial site, which contained the remains of slain samurai, directly beneath the building [=SVU2=] was training in.]] The spirits were lain to rest, once it was discovered, and rites were performed on the site.
* PhenotypeStereotype: In the New York city dream, most of the characters who appear are blond haired, blue eyed versions of the core cast--with a few exceptions--as exceptions -- as is everyone else in New York City. They're also all [[GunNut gun crazy]]. ''All'' of them.



* RealRobot: About as close to realistic as you can get, aside from some slightly whimsical giant police weaponry; even military Labors are pretty delicate and lightly armed.
** Um, except that the TV series has in its main story arc a flying shiny black giant robot with wings that wouldn't look out of place in a latter-day Gundam show, and a Labor with ''FrickinLaserBeams'' ''[[AustinPowers attached to its head]]''.
** Exceptions. Both were ''very'' special models not meant for mass production, the close-range Griffon more so than the Phantom. The Griffon was also built without cost in mind and lots of overtime from the engineers in Schaft's Project Division Seven. It also helps that said flight was extremely limited and was brute thrust all the way, ending in crashes both times.
** And everybody got utterly shocked when the Griffin flew, since neither of them thought possible a Labor was able to fly (in the first chapter Noa was informed -to her grief- that making flying a Labor would be very complicated), and later were still discussing it (reasoning that it could have not gone very far). Also, note that the Griffin removed its own arm before taking off to lose extra weight.

to:

* RealRobot: About as close to realistic as you can get, aside from some slightly whimsical giant police weaponry; even weaponry. Even military Labors are pretty delicate and lightly armed.
** Um, except that the TV series has in its main story arc a flying shiny black giant robot with wings that wouldn't look out of place in a latter-day Gundam show, and a Labor with ''FrickinLaserBeams'' ''[[AustinPowers attached to its head]]''.
** Exceptions. Both were ''very'' special models not meant for mass production, the
The close-range Griffon more so than (and the Phantom. The Griffon was also Phantom in a lesser extent) is an obvious exception, since it wasn't going to be mass produced and it was built without cost in mind and lots of overtime from the engineers in Schaft's Project Division Seven. It also helps that said flight Its flight, for example, was extremely limited and was brute thrust all the way, ending in crashes both times.
** And everybody
times. Everybody got utterly shocked when the Griffin Griffon flew, since neither of them thought possible a Labor was able to fly (in the first chapter Noa (since it was informed -to her grief- earlier mentioned that making flying a Labor would be very complicated), and later were still discussing it (reasoning that it could have not gone very far). Also, note that the Griffin removed complicated, due to its own arm before taking off to lose extra weight.weight).



* RunningGag: Noa frantically running from something, almost fainting, quickly recovering. Happens at least three times in the course of the series. Usually from something monstrous--like albino {{sewer gator}}s.
** Gotoh using Shinohara's hot-headedness and curiosity in missions to confirm suspicions that he has already glossed over ''waaaaaaay'' before. Which is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Shinobu during the first film, when she comments on Gotoh's habit of manipulating Asuma.
*** He usually does this to avoid the higher-ups noticing that he is the one that is actually ruffling the feathers.
** The unit sometimes try to hide stuff and sneak out from Captain Gotoh; they never succeed in getting anything past him. It shows that they are somewhat unaware of just how curious he can be.

to:

* RunningGag: RunningGag:
**
Noa frantically running from something, almost fainting, quickly recovering. Happens at least three times in the course of the series. Usually from something monstrous--like albino {{sewer gator}}s.
** Gotoh using Shinohara's hot-headedness and curiosity in missions to confirm suspicions that he has already glossed over ''waaaaaaay'' before. Which is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Shinobu during the first film, when she comments on Gotoh's habit of manipulating Asuma.
***
Asuma. He ''also'' usually does this to avoid the higher-ups noticing that he is the one that is actually ruffling the feathers.
** The unit sometimes try tries to hide stuff and sneak sneaks out from Captain Gotoh; they Gotoh. They never succeed in getting anything past him. It shows that they are somewhat unaware of just how curious he can be.



** Ohta's trigger-happy approach to ''every mission''; good thing that he is actually [[spoiler: an excellent shooter]].
** Shinshi's tendency to get absolutely livid when he and/or his wife is ridiculed. Do fear the nerdy guy!
** Sakaki's line to get everyone going when there's a call goes something like this:
-->"Hurry up, or I'll throw the lot of you into the sea!"
*** Even Shinohara makes fun of this at one point in the series.
** The public's perception of Division 2 is constantly mentioned to be on the lines of "violent", "freeloaders" and "a huge waste of taxpayer money"; the high command's efforts regarding Division 2 is to put them into a positive publicity stunt as frequently as they can so that the public opinion aims for the better. It's apparently not enough that the Division 2 has saved Tokyo multiple times and has even backed up Division 1 when they fall short; [[spoiler: it's worth mentioning that the high command likes captain Nagumo of Division 1 way more than Gotoh of Division 2, so they don't quite help to the cause]].
** Shinohara and Noa have a habit of bickering that translates into the field; Labor 1's operation during missions usually has Noa going on a multitude of unlikely tangents while on the Labor while Shinohara pulls her down to Earth from the commanding car. He is never above making her mad or making her do stuff she doesn't want to do; she doesn't mind, except when he stops bickering... because ''THAT's'' when something's wrong.

to:

** Ohta's trigger-happy approach to ''every mission''; mission''. It's good thing that he is actually [[spoiler: an excellent shooter]].
** Shinshi's tendency to get absolutely livid when he and/or his wife is ridiculed. Do fear the nerdy guy!
ridiculed.
** Sakaki's line to get everyone going when there's a call goes something like this:
-->"Hurry
"Hurry up, or I'll throw the lot of you into the sea!"
***
sea!" Even Shinohara makes fun of this at one point in the series.
** The public's perception of Division 2 is constantly mentioned to be on the lines of "violent", "freeloaders" and "a huge waste of taxpayer money"; the money". The high command's efforts regarding Division 2 is to put them into a positive publicity stunt as frequently as they can so that the public opinion aims for the better. It's apparently not enough that the Division 2 has saved Tokyo multiple times and has even backed up Division 1 when they fall short; [[spoiler: it's worth mentioning that the high command likes captain Nagumo of Division 1 way more than Gotoh of Division 2, so they don't quite help to the cause]].
** Shinohara and Noa have a habit of bickering that translates into the field; field. Labor 1's operation during missions usually has Noa going on a multitude of unlikely tangents while on the Labor while Shinohara pulls her down to Earth from the commanding car. He is never above making her mad or making her do stuff she doesn't want to do; do, she doesn't mind, except when he stops bickering... because ''THAT's'' when something's wrong.



* SewerGator: [=SV2=] encounters large albino alligators underground on two occasions:

to:

* SewerGator: [=SV2=] encounters large albino alligators underground on two occasions:occasions --



* ShownTheirWork: Seen [[http://www.mangahere.com/manga/patlabor/c001/102.html here]] and [[http://www.mangahere.com/manga/patlabor/c001/103.html here]], for the manga version, which used an actual map of the city of Tokyo for accuracy. Also seen in the following link with [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwNRv-lubCg the intercept sequence]] of the 2nd Movie.

to:

* ShownTheirWork: ShoutOut: The whole Griffon plotline, from Brocken fighting Ingram to collect its data to the Griffon itself, is HUGE shout out to [[Anime/{{Gigantor}} Tetsujin No. 28]]. Simply replace Brocken and Griffon with Baccus and Black Ox and the whole thing should be clearer.
* ShownTheirWork:
**
Seen [[http://www.mangahere.com/manga/patlabor/c001/102.html here]] and [[http://www.mangahere.com/manga/patlabor/c001/103.html here]], for the manga version, which used an actual map of the city of Tokyo for accuracy. Also seen in the following link with [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwNRv-lubCg the intercept sequence]] of the 2nd Movie.



* ASimplePlan
* SittingOnTheRoof: Particularly egregious, as the Special Vehicles 2 building (formerly a manufacturing facility) has a couple of decks on the roof, and yet they still go onto the actual roof on occasion. Also a sort of Subversion (or maybe just a testament to how widely used the trope is) in that [=SV2=] is on reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay - there's pretty much no need to go up there ''specifically'' for some quiet time!
* SlidingScaleOfRealisticVersusFantastic: Differs. See Mood Whiplash above. The two movies helmed by Mamoru Oshii are highly realistic with situations that could happen in the real world; the antagonists in both are terrorists that utilize methods that can be and have been used in real life. The TV show is realistic in its portrayal of labor crime as well... until the main story arc kicks in, and the [=SV2=] battles Bond villains [[strike:SPECTRE]] Schaft and their super-robot prototypes. Oh, and monsters, dragons and ghosts too.
** ...well when you put it like that, the non-movie continuities sound ''scarier''.
** And then there's the live-action series. Oshii just looks like he's having fun with this trope there.

to:

* %%* ASimplePlan
* SittingOnTheRoof: Particularly egregious, as the Special Vehicles 2 building (formerly a manufacturing facility) has a couple of decks on the roof, and yet they still go onto the actual roof on occasion. Also a sort of Subversion (or maybe just a testament to how widely used the trope is) in that [=SV2=] is on reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay - there's pretty much no need to go up there ''specifically'' for some quiet time!
occasion.
* SlidingScaleOfRealisticVersusFantastic: Differs. See Mood Whiplash above. It differs depending on the media you are watching or reading.
**
The two movies helmed by Mamoru Oshii Creator/MamoruOshii are highly realistic with situations that could happen in the real world; world, as the antagonists in both are terrorists that utilize methods that can be and have been used in real life. life.
**
The TV show is mostly realistic in its portrayal of labor crime as well... until the main story arc kicks in, and the [=SV2=] battles Bond villains [[strike:SPECTRE]] Schaft and their super-robot prototypes. Oh, prototypes... and monsters, dragons and ghosts too.
** ...well when you put it like that, the non-movie continuities sound ''scarier''.
** And then there's the The ''Film/TheNextGenerationPatlabor'' live-action series. series plays with this, considering that Oshii just looks like he's having fun with this trope there.is in the helm of the project and it's a sequel to the animated movies.



** Also played straight by Noa and Asuma, in the {{OVA}} continuity (until the live-action series confirmed they ended up married, anyway). However, near the end of the ''Mobile Police/New Files'' continuity, their relationship [[MaybeEverAfter shows signs of becoming]] [[RelationshipUpgrade "more than friends"]].

to:

** Also played Played straight by Noa and Asuma, Asuma in the {{OVA}} continuity (until the live-action series confirmed they ended up married, anyway).continuity. However, near the end of the ''Mobile Police/New Files'' continuity, their relationship [[MaybeEverAfter shows signs of becoming]] [[RelationshipUpgrade "more than friends"]].



*** Shinohara Heavy Industries is actually GenreSavvy about this trope. After the poor showing their first massproduction Ingram makes, they get SV2 to help them develop a new one. The resulting Economy Model Ingram mk. II is actually superior in some respects to the original AV-98.

to:

*** Shinohara Heavy Industries is actually GenreSavvy about this trope. After the poor showing their first massproduction Ingram makes, they get SV2 [=SV2=] to help them develop a new one. The resulting Economy Model Ingram mk. II is actually superior in some respects to the original AV-98.



** The Type Zero also shows up near the end of the manga, piloted by [[spoiler:Noa]]. It actually does quite well, until [[spoiler:the bad guys deactivate the computers that did the calculations for the Type Zero -- since it was a prototype it relied on an outside unit rather than having all the hardware inside the chassis]].
*** In the TV anime and [=OVAs=], the Type Zero is fully functional on its own, but the software is ''designed'' to avoid collateral damage, which gets them all trashed.
* SurprisinglyGoodEnglish: Present in the original Japanese dub for the intercept sequence of Movie 2; it's in Japanese-accented but correct English.

to:

** The Type Zero also shows up near the end of the manga, piloted by [[spoiler:Noa]]. It actually does quite well, until [[spoiler:the bad guys deactivate the computers that did the calculations for the Type Zero -- since it was a prototype it relied on an outside unit rather than having all the hardware inside the chassis]].
***
chassis]]. In the TV anime and [=OVAs=], the Type Zero is fully functional on its own, but the software is ''designed'' to avoid collateral damage, which gets them all trashed.
* SurprisinglyGoodEnglish: Present in the original Japanese dub for the intercept sequence of Movie 2; it's 2. It's in Japanese-accented but correct English.



* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: Made in '88, set in '98. See the tagline below.
** The 2nd OVA (made in '92) had a character [[IKnewIt ask about]] renting ''Franchise/DieHard 5''. (Even funnier now that there IS a ''[[Film/AGoodDayToDieHard Die Hard 5]]''!)
** Really, aside from underestimating the leap in technology, they got just about everything else right.
* UnnecessaryCombatRoll: In giant robots, even.
* UsedFuture: To a point; nothing is really much worse for the wear in '98 than it was in '88, aside from what a decade might do to something.

to:

* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: Made The franchise started in '88, 1988, but was set in '98. See the tagline below.
** The 2nd OVA (made in '92) had a character [[IKnewIt ask about]] renting ''Franchise/DieHard 5''. (Even funnier now that there IS a ''[[Film/AGoodDayToDieHard Die Hard 5]]''!)
** Really, aside
1998. Aside from underestimating understimating the leap in technology, they got just about everything else right.
* %%* UnnecessaryCombatRoll: In giant robots, even.
* UsedFuture: To a point; point, as nothing is really much worse for the wear in '98 1998 than it was in '88, 1988, aside from what a decade might do to something.



* WelcomeEpisode: Only the TV anime, as far as Noa is concerned. The first OVA has the entire Division 2 transfer to Special Vehicles 2 the same time[[note]]Noa actually gets to the building before the others, since they took the bus and she has a scooter[[/note]], and the manga starts with Noa still in training ''before'' getting any sort of Labor instruction.

to:

* WelcomeEpisode: Only the TV anime, as WelcomeEpisode:
** As
far as Noa is concerned.concerned, she was the only one who got an introduction in the TV anime. The first OVA has the entire Division 2 transfer to Special Vehicles 2 the same time[[note]]Noa actually gets to the building before the others, since they took the bus and she has a scooter[[/note]], and the manga starts with Noa still in training ''before'' getting any sort of Labor instruction.



* WholeEpisodeFlashback
* WholePlotReference

to:

* %%* WholeEpisodeFlashback
* WholePlotReferenceWholePlotReference:



* ZombieApocalypse: The big battle in the first movie is a HoldTheLine action to prevent civilization from being destroyed against an onslaught of slow moving, dumb, but relentless horde of opponents that are afflicted with a highly contageous virus that infects one of the good guys and turns it against his friends. Only instead of living dead humans, it affects mecha. Construction mecha. The kind that were meant to ''easily demolish buildings'' and are used throughout the Tokyo Bay area. You may now begin panicking.

to:

* ZombieApocalypse: The big battle in the first movie is a HoldTheLine action to prevent civilization from being destroyed against an onslaught of slow moving, dumb, but relentless horde of opponents that are afflicted with a highly contageous virus that infects one of the good guys and turns it against his friends. Only instead of living dead humans, it affects mecha. Construction mecha. The ''construction mecha'', the kind that were meant to ''easily demolish buildings'' and are used throughout the Tokyo Bay area. You may now begin panicking.area.
29th Aug '16 11:10:36 AM Morgenthaler
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** [[http://imgur.com/EbqRwQ5 The opening credits to the TV series feature]] [[WeAreNotTheWehrmacht Bundeswehr]] labors ("Brocken" models shown later in the Phantom arc) standing guard at the BerlinWall.

to:

** [[http://imgur.com/EbqRwQ5 The opening credits to the TV series feature]] [[WeAreNotTheWehrmacht [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht Bundeswehr]] labors ("Brocken" models shown later in the Phantom arc) standing guard at the BerlinWall.
21st Aug '16 5:48:02 PM foxley
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Added DiffLines:

* ShootingGallery: [[TriggerHappy Otah]] gets chewed out for not only shooting an automated target, but [[CoupDeGrace charging in to smash it up with his baton afterwards]], destroying an expensive piece of equipment.
21st Aug '16 8:04:08 AM Eyeshield
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* HumongousMecha: Labors come in on the smaller side, being at most about 8 meters tall. One of the Mini-Pato shorts explains that, if they were any taller or shorter, the Ingrams (and the Labors in general) wouldn't be able to do their job. Too tall, and Labors are mass-produced house-sized bulldozers (and in the way). Too short, and they're as useful for construction as [[ArmoredTropersVotoms ATs]].

to:

* HumongousMecha: Labors come in on the smaller side, being at most about 8 meters tall. One of the Mini-Pato shorts explains that, if they were any taller or shorter, the Ingrams (and the Labors in general) wouldn't be able to do their job. Too tall, and Labors are mass-produced house-sized bulldozers (and in the way). Too short, and they're as useful for construction as [[ArmoredTropersVotoms [[Anime/ArmoredTrooperVotoms ATs]].
13th Aug '16 12:05:03 AM Unityd3v
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13th Aug '16 12:04:59 AM Unityd3v
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A reboot of the anime is set to debut in October of 2016.

to:

A reboot of the anime 10 minute animated short called ''Patlabor Reboot'' is set to debut air in October of 2016.
10th Aug '16 11:14:56 AM Unityd3v
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Added DiffLines:

A reboot of the anime is set to debut in October of 2016.
7th Aug '16 2:07:38 PM Kalaong
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Added DiffLines:

* DeconstructorFleet: Of HumongousMecha in general.
** They're rarely over a dozen meters tall, so as not to crush their own feet. And one tripping will still take out a house. They don't even walk long distances; they're stored at construction sites like any other piece of heavy equipment, and the Patlabors are transported to combat scenes in their own specialized trucks.
** FallingIntoTheCockpit is impossible as they're complicated as hell; Noa teaching her mech to tie a shoelace knot is considered proof of her being a genius pilot. Most people can't do much with even a SuperPrototype robot even if they find themselves piloting one.
** Weapons are scaled-up versions of conventional firearms; a laser shows up in a single two-part episode, but never seen again - it destroyed all its foes, but it was ''[[AwesomeButImpractical too delicate and expensive]].''
** WarForFunAndProfit is neither fun nor profitable; Schaft Enterprises makes an attempt to pit one of their military prototypes against the police's Ingram in pursuit of combat data. What followed was ridiculously stupid, as the only people they could find willing to do such a ridiculously stupid thing were some deadbeat stoner BombThrowingAnarchists - who fled the scene once they ''realized'' how ridiculously stupid the whole thing was.
*** Of course, the whole Griffon plotline, from Brocken fighting Ingram to collect its data to the Griffon itself, is HUGE Shout Out to [[Anime/{{Gigantor}} Tetsujin No. 28]]. Simply replace Brocken and Griffon with Baccus and Black Ox and the whole thing should be clearer.
13th Jun '16 6:26:07 PM Beiahnu
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Set in the not-so-far-off future of 1998, this late-80s/early-90s anime, ''Mobile Police Patlabor'', is the story of police officers fighting crime with giant robots. The [=SV2=]'s Division 1 are a corps of competent, hard-working police who always get their man -- but ''Patlabor'' isn't about them. No, it's Division ''2'' that gets the spotlight, that scruffy, rag-tag band of half-competent cops with a propensity towards massive property damage.

to:

Set in the not-so-far-off future of 1998, this late-80s/early-90s anime, ''Mobile Police Patlabor'', is the story of police officers fighting crime with giant robots. The [=SV2=]'s Special Vehicles Unit's Division 1 are a corps of competent, hard-working police who always get their man -- but ''Patlabor'' isn't about them. No, it's Division ''2'' that gets the spotlight, that scruffy, rag-tag band of half-competent cops with a propensity towards massive property damage.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Anime.PatLabor