History AndIMustScream / LiveActionTV

22nd Sep '16 10:23:15 AM WoozyPounce
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** In "Final Escape", a woman serving life imprisonment for murdering her husband plans to escape by conspiring with the prison gravedigger (a trustee inmate) to hide her in the next coffin to be buried in the prison graveyard and dig her up later. When the next burial is imminent, she hides in the coffin without looking to see who the corpse is. After burial, the gravedigger seems to be taking an awfully long time to arrive to dig her up; she becomes curious as to who is in the coffin with her, lights her cigarette lighter, and sees that it's the gravedigger himself.

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** In "Final Escape", a woman serving life imprisonment for murdering her husband plans to escape by conspiring with the prison gravedigger (a trustee inmate) to hide her in the next coffin to be buried in the prison graveyard and dig her up later. When the next burial is imminent, she hides in the coffin without looking to see who the corpse is. After burial, the gravedigger seems to be taking an awfully long time to arrive to dig her up; she becomes curious as to who is in the coffin with her, lights her cigarette lighter, a match, and sees that it's the gravedigger himself.
18th Aug '16 9:29:47 PM Gravidef
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* In part seven of ''Literature/NightmaresAndDreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King'', "Autopsy room four", the protagonist is bitten by a venomous snake and falls into a paralytic state extremely similar to death, except ''he's fully aware''. When he's taken to the hospital, the doctors prepare for an autopsy...

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* In part seven of ''Literature/NightmaresAndDreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King'', "Autopsy room four", Room Four", the protagonist is bitten by a venomous snake and falls into a paralytic state extremely similar to death, except ''he's fully aware''. When he's taken to the hospital, the doctors prepare for an autopsy...autopsy...
** "You Know They Got a Hell of a Band" has a similar situation: a young married couple gets lost in the woods on a road trip and find themselves in a small town called Rock and Roll Heaven, which is populated by two groups of individuals. The first group consists of the spirits of famous rock stars--Janis Joplin's the local waitress, Elvis is the mayor, Otis Redding is the police chief, etc. While this seems amazing, the ghosts/zombies CameBackWrong and are cruel, vindictive people who love to torture humans. This explains the second group: a collection of everyday people who also got lost in the forest and are now trapped in the town. They spend all day doing menial jobs, then are forced to attend the nightly rock concerts in the town park--which, despite "ending" at midnight, can go on for an entire ''year.'' And none of these poor individuals ever age, or die, or change in any way. The kicker? ''They did nothing to deserve this''--King expressly states that this ''isn't'' Hell. It's just some horrible pocket dimension for people who get lost.
7th Aug '16 6:54:41 PM nombretomado
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* On ''DeadLikeMe'', George, the main character, is a Reaper who must take people's souls out of their bodies at specific times. On an early episode, she decides to not show up to take a soul. It then shows the person trapped in their dead body receiving an autopsy and screaming in horror.

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* On ''DeadLikeMe'', ''Series/DeadLikeMe'', George, the main character, is a Reaper who must take people's souls out of their bodies at specific times. On an early episode, she decides to not show up to take a soul. It then shows the person trapped in their dead body receiving an autopsy and screaming in horror.
17th Apr '16 10:35:19 AM darksecret
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Added DiffLines:

** In "The Idiot's Lantern", the Wire pulls off people's faces from inside their televisions, leaving their bodies to wander around blindly (until they're taken away by TheMenInBlack, that is) and their consciousness trapped on a TV screen. It's not explicitly stated whether they are, in fact, aware, but as they're seen silently yelling for help, it would seem so...
30th Mar '16 4:57:05 PM Unhari
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** Lore is burdened with this sort of fate after his first appearance. In order to get rid of him, Data beams his evil brother into outer space, where the NighInvulnerable android will be cursed to drift around aimlessly in the endless vacuum, completely helpless. It's [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]], since he's rescued after a "mere" few years when the crew of an alien ship discover his body floating around in space at a thousand-to-one odds.



** To say nothing of those that the Borg assimilate. As Picard implied shortly after being removed from the Collective in "The Best of Both Worlds", they're privy to ''everything'' the Borg-them is doing, but are helpless to do anything about it. That Picard was able to break through his "Locutus of Borg" personality and tell Data how to defeat the Borg was nothing short of a miracle.
** Moriarty -- the self-aware hologram intended to outsmart Data -- is still conscious when he is deactivated, and speaks of "Brief, terrifying periods of consciousness . . . disembodied, without substance." In a subversion (?) of this trope, he is eventually trapped in a small device running a permanent simulation in which he thinks he has escaped into the real world. Geordi couldn't get him into the real world, but this is still an ignominious and condescending end.

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** To say nothing of those that the Borg assimilate. As Picard implied shortly after being removed from the Collective in "The Best of Both Worlds", they're privy to ''everything'' the Borg-them is doing, but are helpless to do anything about it. That Picard was able to break through his "Locutus of Borg" personality and tell Data how to defeat the Borg was nothing short of a miracle.
** Moriarty -- the self-aware hologram intended to outsmart Data -- is still conscious when he is deactivated, and speaks of "Brief, terrifying periods of consciousness . . . disembodied, without substance." In a subversion (?) of this trope, he is eventually trapped in a small device running a permanent simulation in which he thinks he has escaped into the real world. Geordi couldn't get him into the real world, but this is still an ignominious and condescending end.world.
22nd Mar '16 7:51:38 AM Morgenthaler
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* In a situation similar to Adam Monroe's above, another immortal on ''Highlander: the Series'' once sought out Duncan for revenge. Why? Because Duncan had left him stranded on a tiny, barren island, where he'd died of starvation every day until rescued.
** A few characters suffered this way in ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'', including one, a [[ThoseWackyNazis Nazi]], who'd been bound with weights and thrown into a river, resulting in him drowning, reviving, drowning, reviving...

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* In a situation similar to Adam Monroe's above, another ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'':
** An
immortal on ''Highlander: the Series'' once sought out Duncan for revenge. Why? Because Duncan had left him stranded on a tiny, barren island, where he'd died of starvation every day until rescued.
** A few characters suffered this way in ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'', including one, a [[ThoseWackyNazis Nazi]], who'd An [[{{Ghostapo}} immortal Nazi]] had been bound with weights and thrown into a river, resulting in him drowning, reviving, drowning, reviving...
22nd Mar '16 7:49:02 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Angel}}'' had a baddy ending up like this. After he'd died, his ghost survived by sending other people to Hell in his place. After using [[AppliedPhlebotinum phlebotinum]] to bring him back to mortal life, and realizing they can't kill him without starting the whole thing over again, the heroes instead imprisoned him in a life-extending "cell": a locked closet in an empty basement hallway. Forever.
** [[spoiler: The Wolfram and Hart building collapses in the series finale, meaning that he likely died when that occurred anyway.]]
*** But then again [[spoiler: Wolfram & Hart (along with the rest of L.A.) gets cast into hell immediately afterwards: so he ends up there anyway.]]

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* ''Series/{{Angel}}'' had ''Series/{{Angel}}'':
** There's
a baddy ending who ended up like this. After he'd died, his ghost survived by sending other people to Hell in his place. After using [[AppliedPhlebotinum phlebotinum]] to bring him back to mortal life, and realizing they can't kill him without starting the whole thing over again, the heroes instead imprisoned him in a life-extending "cell": a locked closet in an empty basement hallway. Forever.
** [[spoiler: The Wolfram and Hart building collapses in the series finale, meaning that he likely died when that occurred anyway.]]
*** But then again [[spoiler: Wolfram & Hart (along with the rest of L.A.) gets cast into hell immediately afterwards: so he ends up there anyway.]]
Forever.



*** Angel was actually inspired by his time under the ocean to punish the previous guy listed above.
** Also, at one point Gunn was trapped in a hell dimension where he was strapped to a table, and every single day a demon would rip his heart out only for him to wake up the next day and go through it again.
*** He got to scream, it just didn't matter. He also got to spend the non-heart-removal time with a fake life in a fake suburb. But he knew...once a day, it was time to go to the basement...
*** He was thankfully saved...because there had to be ''someone'' whose heart was ripped out by the demon every day...there had to be a replacement. And it was actually...[[CrowningMomentOfFunny the very demon himself]].

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*** Angel was actually inspired by his time under the ocean to punish the previous guy listed above.
** Also, at At one point Gunn was trapped in a hell dimension where he was strapped to a table, and every single day a demon would rip his heart out only for him to wake up the next day and go through it again.
*** He got to scream, it just didn't matter. He also got to spend the non-heart-removal time with a fake life in a fake suburb. But he knew...once a day, it was time to go to the basement...
*** He was thankfully saved...because there had to be ''someone'' whose heart was ripped out by the demon every day...there had to be a replacement. And it was actually...[[CrowningMomentOfFunny the very demon himself]].
again.



*** And to make it worse? Tara's the only victim of Glory's that gets healed.



*** To put this into perspective, consider how he wasn't able to move and barely feel his own heartbeat during his cryosleep. Is it any wonder he [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW2xxxaplz0 lost his sanity]] before the ''first second'' of his incarceration?



* In ''Series/{{The Vampire Diaries}}'' this is what happens to a vampire when starved of blood. Their skin desiccates and their muscles atrophy, leaving them paralyzed, essentially mummified, and COMPLETELY CONSCIOUS.

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* In ''Series/{{The Vampire Diaries}}'' this Diaries}}'':
** This
is what happens to a vampire when starved of blood. Their skin desiccates and their muscles atrophy, leaving them paralyzed, essentially mummified, and COMPLETELY CONSCIOUS.



* In the ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': episode "Exit Wounds", Jack Harkness is buried alive under Cardiff, constantly suffocating, reviving (painfully), and dying again... for 1874 years. He was buried in 27 AD then dug up in 1901, then cryogenically frozen (yes, in 1901, Torchwood could do that then) to bring him back to the present, paradox free.
** When he wakes up, he is mildly annoyed (guess you can get used to Fates Worse Than Death).
** Attempted by the government villains in Day Two of ''Children of Earth'', as they try to contain Jack by [[spoiler:''encasing him in concrete''. Fortunately, he gets rescued by Gwen, Rhys and Ianto pretty quickly.]]
*** This is after, having blown up Torchwood base (to try to wipe out Torchwood), they find only a few of Jack's bones. They cart them off to their headquarters, only to then find that Jack's regenerative abilities are still active, and he is completely regenerating from just those few bones they had found, growing into a horribly mangled-looking corpse, with bloody bones and a few internal organs, at which point he starts screaming.... nonstop. He only stops many hours later once the rest of his muscles, skin and various other body tissues have finished regrowing.
*** Also done by [[spoiler:the aliens ''to the children'']].

to:

* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'':
**
In the ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': episode "Exit Wounds", Jack Harkness is buried alive under Cardiff, constantly suffocating, reviving (painfully), and dying again... for 1874 years. He was buried in 27 AD then dug up in 1901, then cryogenically frozen (yes, in 1901, Torchwood could do that then) to bring him back to the present, paradox free.
** When he wakes up, he is mildly annoyed (guess you can get used to Fates Worse Than Death).
** Attempted by the government villains in Day Two of ''Children of Earth'', as they try to contain Jack by [[spoiler:''encasing him in concrete''. Fortunately, he gets rescued by Gwen, Rhys and Ianto pretty quickly.]]
*** This is after, having blown up Torchwood base (to try to wipe out Torchwood), they find only a few of Jack's bones. They cart them off to their headquarters, only to then find that Jack's regenerative abilities are still active, and he is completely regenerating from just those few bones they had found, growing into a horribly mangled-looking corpse, with bloody bones and a few internal organs, at which point he starts screaming.... nonstop. He only stops many hours later once the rest of his muscles, skin and various other body tissues have finished regrowing.
*** Also done by [[spoiler:the aliens ''to the children'']].
free.



** The premise of season four of Torchwood, "Miracle Day," is that no-one dies or heals after what would have killed them, making this trope apply to everyone who had a particularly violent almost-death in that season. [[spoiler:Ellis Hartley Monroe]]'s fate at the end of episode four of 'Miracle Day' is merely one of the most extreme examples [[spoiler:(her car was crushed into a cube... while she was tied up in the back. The last shot of that episode is an extreme close up of her eye frantically looking around from inside the car cube...)]], see also the 'survivor' of the explosion in the first episode [[spoiler:(who was still living after being at the centre of an explosion and having his head removed to see what would happen)]] and everyone who [[spoiler:was burned to ashes for being as good as dead in the overflow camps]]...

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** * Attempted by the government villains in Day Two of ''Series/TorchwoodChildrenOfEarth'', as they try to contain Jack by [[spoiler:''encasing him in concrete''. Fortunately, he gets rescued by Gwen, Rhys and Ianto pretty quickly.]]
*
The premise of season four of Torchwood, "Miracle Day," ''Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay'' is that no-one dies or heals after what would have killed them, making this trope apply to everyone who had a particularly violent almost-death in that season. [[spoiler:Ellis Hartley Monroe]]'s fate at the end of episode four of 'Miracle Day' is merely one of the most extreme examples [[spoiler:(her car was crushed into a cube... while she was tied up in the back. The last shot of that episode is an extreme close up of her eye frantically looking around from inside the car cube...)]], see also the 'survivor' of the explosion in the first episode [[spoiler:(who was still living after being at the centre of an explosion and having his head removed to see what would happen)]] and everyone who [[spoiler:was burned to ashes for being as good as dead in the overflow camps]]...



** Presumably, the "iron maiden" also provided full life support, possibly including muscle-toning since he can move easily even right out of the box. He's not even hungry or thirsty. It may be some form of stasis that does not shut down mental function. AWizardDidIt.
*** See the "Literature" section - Wyatt's "predecessor" Nick Chopper (the original one) really didn't fare any better. The 1939 movie {{Bowdlerized}} things big time.



* In the season 2 finale of ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', Hiro Nakamura takes revenge upon Adam Monroe this way by [[BuriedAlive sealing him in a coffin, buried deep underground]]. Since Adam is immortal, he's likely trapped in there for eternity.[[spoiler:(Or at least until season 3.)]] In the graphic novels, it is shown that he is repeatedly dying, presumably of suffocation, only to be brought back to life by his regenerative powers again and again. BewareTheNiceOnes indeed...

to:

* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'':
**
In the season 2 finale of ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', finale, Hiro Nakamura takes revenge upon Adam Monroe this way by [[BuriedAlive sealing him in a coffin, buried deep underground]]. Since Adam is immortal, he's likely trapped in there for eternity.[[spoiler:(Or at least until season 3.)]] In the graphic novels, it is shown that he is repeatedly dying, presumably of suffocation, only to be brought back to life by his regenerative powers again and again. BewareTheNiceOnes indeed...



*** In the Flash Animations staring Methos, prior to taking his first head, Methos did this to the pharaoh that had been mentoring him after learning that the pharaoh had been the one that had ordered the death of Methos' wife and her family. The pharaoh was mummified alive and buried until his tomb was discovered under water 5000+ years later.

to:

*** ** In the Flash Animations staring Methos, prior to taking his first head, Methos did this to the pharaoh that had been mentoring him after learning that the pharaoh had been the one that had ordered the death of Methos' wife and her family. The pharaoh was mummified alive and buried until his tomb was discovered under water 5000+ years later.



*** Or his consciousness won't survive complete decomposition. It's not really made clear, but it is supposed to be [[ArtisticLicenseBiology "science"]] keeping him alive.



*** Played very straight when you consider that [[spoiler: Adam]] was left in the pit without a token effort to save him.



* In ''Series/StargateSG1,'' hosts to the Goa'uld are subjected to being stuck within their own bodies unable to communicate or control themselves, watching their bodies commit horrible atrocities- ''for millennia''.

to:

* In ''Series/StargateSG1,'' ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** The
hosts to the Goa'uld are subjected to being stuck within their own bodies unable to communicate or control themselves, watching their bodies commit horrible atrocities- ''for millennia''.



* Subverted in ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': the crew stops on a planet where the newly-declared Empress and Regent are customarily turned into [[TakenForGranite living statues]] for the eighty years it takes for the current rulers to die. However, rather than being viewed as a punishment that drives them insane, it's a duty that makes them wiser by allowing them to observe royal court proceedings; also, people can talk with the couple via a psychic headset, which no doubt helps lessen the monotony somewhat.

to:

* Subverted in ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** Subverted. The
crew stops on a planet where the newly-declared Empress and Regent are customarily turned into [[TakenForGranite living statues]] for the eighty years it takes for the current rulers to die. However, rather than being viewed as a punishment that drives them insane, it's a duty that makes them wiser by allowing them to observe royal court proceedings; also, people can talk with the couple via a psychic headset, which no doubt helps lessen the monotony somewhat.



* The ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' episode "Forever" features this trope with the MonsterOfTheWeek, whose touch can turn people to wax. They clearly remain conscious during this, though, as the camera shows their eyes still moving. ''Shattering'' the wax statue, however, is implied to be fatal.

to:

* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'':
**
The ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' episode "Forever" features this trope with the MonsterOfTheWeek, whose touch can turn people to wax. They clearly remain conscious during this, though, as the camera shows their eyes still moving. ''Shattering'' the wax statue, however, is implied to be fatal.
22nd Mar '16 7:40:58 AM Morgenthaler
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* A particularly dark example was in ''CrossingJordan'', which, for those of you who didn't know, is a show about a coroner's office. The victim is shot and spends the most of the episode paralyzed. He used to be a prosecutor and Macy's friend, but underwent a FaceHeelTurn to AmoralAttorney when Macy refused to falsify evidence to put away a serial killer. He keeps pleading with Jordan and Macy not to autopsy him, promising he'll change. He's only saved when Macy digs the bullet out and realizes he's still bleeding. Turns out he and his two guests (who were killed) had improperly prepared [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugu Fugu]], and his secretary shot him. On his way out of the hospital, Macy gives him a bell, and tells him that people used to be buried with strings attached to bells in case they were buried alive. The lawyer points out that Macy just effectively admitted the coroner's office is at fault, and he'll both be suing and representing the woman who shot him. [[LaserGuidedKarma Then he walks outside and gets hit by a bus]]. The last shots of the episode is the team looking down into his body bag, and their evaluator asking if they're ''sure'' he's dead. The bag is closed up, using the same POV shot from the lawyer's perspective as earlier, and then we hear a bell tinkling.

to:

* A particularly dark example was in ''CrossingJordan'', ''Series/CrossingJordan'', which, for those of you who didn't know, is a show about a coroner's office. The victim is shot and spends the most of the episode paralyzed. He used to be a prosecutor and Macy's friend, but underwent a FaceHeelTurn to AmoralAttorney when Macy refused to falsify evidence to put away a serial killer. He keeps pleading with Jordan and Macy not to autopsy him, promising he'll change. He's only saved when Macy digs the bullet out and realizes he's still bleeding. Turns out he and his two guests (who were killed) had improperly prepared [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugu Fugu]], and his secretary shot him. On his way out of the hospital, Macy gives him a bell, and tells him that people used to be buried with strings attached to bells in case they were buried alive. The lawyer points out that Macy just effectively admitted the coroner's office is at fault, and he'll both be suing and representing the woman who shot him. [[LaserGuidedKarma Then he walks outside and gets hit by a bus]]. The last shots of the episode is the team looking down into his body bag, and their evaluator asking if they're ''sure'' he's dead. The bag is closed up, using the same POV shot from the lawyer's perspective as earlier, and then we hear a bell tinkling.



* ''AreYouAfraidOfTheDark: The Tale of the 13th Floor''. At the end, Karin is stuck frozen on Earth for ten years in her natural (faceless/mouthless) alien forma.

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* ''AreYouAfraidOfTheDark: The ''Series/AreYouAfraidOfTheDark'':
** "The
Tale of the 13th Floor''.Floor". At the end, Karin is stuck frozen on Earth for ten years in her natural (faceless/mouthless) alien forma.



* ''[[Series/OneThousandWaysToDie 1000 Ways to Die]]'':

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* ''[[Series/OneThousandWaysToDie 1000 Ways to Die]]'':''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'':



* From ''WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' of all places! In one episode, Alex brings a mannequin to life to be her boyfriend. But when it becomes unmanageable, Alex has to turn it back. The mannequin is terrified of having its face turned back into a "featureless knob." After a few moments of life and mobility, his new life is cruelly snatched away and he is stuck as a frozen plastic doll in a store window.

to:

* From ''WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' of all places! In one episode, Alex brings a mannequin to life to be her boyfriend. But when it becomes unmanageable, Alex has to turn it back. The mannequin is terrified of having its face turned back into a "featureless knob." After a few moments of life and mobility, his new life is cruelly snatched away and he is stuck as a frozen plastic doll in a store window.
22nd Mar '16 7:39:41 AM Morgenthaler
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** In another episode of ''House'', one scene shows the patient of the week rendered unconscious by her ailment. House enters, frowns, and approaches her, putting his ear near her mouth to better hear the nearly inaudible, whispery gasps she is making. It is then that he leaps into action, revealing to the rest of the team that ''she has been screaming in agony the entire time'', only she was too weak to make much noise.

to:

** In another episode of ''House'', episode, one scene shows the patient of the week rendered unconscious by her ailment. House enters, frowns, and approaches her, putting his ear near her mouth to better hear the nearly inaudible, whispery gasps she is making. It is then that he leaps into action, revealing to the rest of the team that ''she has been screaming in agony the entire time'', only she was too weak to make much noise.
22nd Mar '16 7:39:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/TalesFromTheCrypt'' took that theme UpToEleven, letting a character face such a fate '''twice'''. The first time, he'd been injected with an experimental anaesthetic by his medical-researcher brother, who knew the protagonist was still conscious and staged the "autopsy" as a prank (!), paying back how his sibling had picked on him for years. After being revived, the protagonist dies for real, and the episode ends with him -- consciousness prolonged by the residual drug in his system -- facing a second trip to the autopsy table, this time ''with'' the capacity to feel pain.

to:

* ''Series/TalesFromTheCrypt'' ''Series/TalesFromTheCrypt'':
** An episode
took that theme UpToEleven, letting a character face such a fate '''twice'''. The first time, he'd been injected with an experimental anaesthetic by his medical-researcher brother, who knew the protagonist was still conscious and staged the "autopsy" as a prank (!), paying back how his sibling had picked on him for years. After being revived, the protagonist dies for real, and the episode ends with him -- consciousness prolonged by the residual drug in his system -- facing a second trip to the autopsy table, this time ''with'' the capacity to feel pain.
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