History Analysis / TheSmurfettePrinciple

27th Jan '17 2:08:55 PM StFan
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** In fact, {{Figaro}} the male kitten got his own cartoon series and starred in a few cartoons of his own before either of the main female characters, Minnie or Daisy.

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** In fact, {{Figaro}} WesternAnimation/{{Figaro}} the male kitten got his own cartoon series and starred in a few cartoons of his own before either of the main female characters, Minnie or Daisy.
29th Nov '16 9:40:00 PM 742mph
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A natural consequence of the way that TheChick and other female-specific trope characterizations are presumed to be gender-specific, sometimes an author will write their animal-based characters as if most animals were male. In reality, however, the vast majority of animal species have a sex ratio extremely close to 1:1 due to Fisher's Principle - basically, it's usually advantageous for individual organisms to be genetically predisposed to having more children of their species' less common sex, because those children will have an easier time finding mates, and as that advantageous strategy spreads throughout the population, the sex ratio will grow more balanced until the strategy stops being advantageous. This is true of most vertebrates, including humans, other mammals, birds, fish, and more, as well as most invertebrates that aren't hermaphrodites. Exceptions to this rule are almost always more female than male, such as eusocial insects like ants and certain bees and wasps, whose reproductive units are colonies with one fertile female queen, a small number of fertile male drones, and an army of sterile female workers each. A few reptile species, such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahminy_Blind_Snake brahminy blind snake]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnemidophorus some whiptail lizards]] have even become [[OneGenderRace all-female]] and done away with sexual reproduction entirely. ''Very'' few species are significantly more male than female, the koala being among them - less than 45 percent of koalas are female.

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A natural consequence of the way that TheChick and other female-specific trope characterizations are presumed to be gender-specific, sometimes an author will write their animal-based characters as if most animals were male. In reality, however, the vast majority of animal species have a sex ratio extremely close to 1:1 due to Fisher's Principle - basically, it's usually advantageous for individual organisms to be genetically predisposed to having more children of their species' less common sex, because those children will have an easier time finding mates, and as mates. As that advantageous strategy spreads throughout the population, the sex ratio will grow more balanced until the strategy stops being advantageous. This is true of most vertebrates, including humans, other mammals, birds, fish, and more, as well as most invertebrates that aren't hermaphrodites. Exceptions to this rule are almost always more female than male, such as eusocial insects like ants and certain bees and wasps, whose reproductive units are colonies with one fertile female queen, a small number of fertile male drones, and an army of sterile female workers each. A few reptile species, such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahminy_Blind_Snake brahminy blind snake]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnemidophorus some whiptail lizards]] have even become [[OneGenderRace all-female]] and done away with sexual reproduction entirely. ''Very'' few species are significantly more male than female, the koala being among them - less than 45 percent of koalas are female.
29th Nov '16 9:37:38 PM 742mph
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A natural consequence of the way that TheChick and other female-specific trope characterizations are presumed to be gender-specific, sometimes an author will write their animal-based characters as if most animals were male even though the vast majority of species '''are actually predominantly female'''. Humans and other primates are mostly balanced between male and female, but species such as ants and eusocial bees and wasps, are virtually all female. Nevermind that many species such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahminy_Blind_Snake brahminy blind snake]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnemidophorus some whiptail lizards]] are '''[[OneGenderRace all-female]]'''. Indeed, (when birds and mammals are excluded) being either completely female or hermaphroditic is the norm for living things on Earth. [[note]]One of the ''very'' few species that has more male members than female ones in real life is the koala. Less than 45 percent of koalas are female.[[/note]] In real-world life forms, most everything less "evolved" than a duck is either considered "female" based on the reproductive zygote they produce, is a hermaphrodite, or doesn't even have an intersex status because they use a method of reproduction that doesn't include zygotes at all.

to:

A natural consequence of the way that TheChick and other female-specific trope characterizations are presumed to be gender-specific, sometimes an author will write their animal-based characters as if most animals were male even though male. In reality, however, the vast majority of animal species '''are actually predominantly female'''. Humans have a sex ratio extremely close to 1:1 due to Fisher's Principle - basically, it's usually advantageous for individual organisms to be genetically predisposed to having more children of their species' less common sex, because those children will have an easier time finding mates, and other primates are mostly as that advantageous strategy spreads throughout the population, the sex ratio will grow more balanced between male until the strategy stops being advantageous. This is true of most vertebrates, including humans, other mammals, birds, fish, and female, but species more, as well as most invertebrates that aren't hermaphrodites. Exceptions to this rule are almost always more female than male, such as eusocial insects like ants and eusocial certain bees and wasps, whose reproductive units are virtually all female. Nevermind that many species colonies with one fertile female queen, a small number of fertile male drones, and an army of sterile female workers each. A few reptile species, such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahminy_Blind_Snake brahminy blind snake]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnemidophorus some whiptail lizards]] are '''[[OneGenderRace all-female]]'''. Indeed, (when birds have even become [[OneGenderRace all-female]] and mammals are excluded) being either completely female or hermaphroditic is the norm for living things on Earth. [[note]]One of the ''very'' done away with sexual reproduction entirely. ''Very'' few species that has are significantly more male members than female ones in real life is female, the koala. Less koala being among them - less than 45 percent of koalas are female.[[/note]] In real-world life forms, most everything less "evolved" than a duck is either considered "female" based on the reproductive zygote they produce, is a hermaphrodite, or doesn't even have an intersex status because they use a method of reproduction that doesn't include zygotes at all.
female.



In the case of animal characters this trope arises from the way that humans perceive animals. On one hand humans do not see the [[SecondarySexualCharacteristics secondary characteristics]] that are used for gender identification when they look at an animal. Also, people tend to assume the gender neutral animal is a male and use male pronouns unless the animal looks "feminine." Additionally, English (unlike other languages) does not weight most nouns with an inherent gender. While a European might use different words for male or female horses and know that a female and male of a species are not the same word, an urban English speaker may not know they're talking about a male vs. a female instead of just using synonyms. When dealing with a species with sexes that are extremely different in appearance, an English speaker may even think that they're talking about two different species. [[ViewerGenderConfusion English-speakers don't usually fuss with specific terms]] unless the speaker handles the animal regularly or is looking for a synonym. Also, [[MostWritersAreMale most animators and writers were male]] early on and even in modern times. The species of animals used to represent characters vary according to gender.
16th Oct '16 12:19:29 PM Monolaf317
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** More success was found with its successor shows, ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', The first has Babs Bunny, who was Buster's equal in every way, as well as Shirley The Loon, Fifi [=LaFume=], Rhubella Rat, Sweetie Pie, and so on. The second had Dot Warner (who was, of course, the only female Warner sibling, but she went to some effort to make sure she was not forgotten by adding "...and the Warner sister, Dot!" whenever an opportunity came up), Rita, Minerva Mink, Marita, and Slappy Squirrel. (Interestingly enough, the Warner Brothers were originally supposed to be a trio of ''brothers'' (Smakky, Wakky, and Yakky), with a mischievous little brother character instead of Dot, who was only supposed to be a minor recurring character of "the Warner Cousin". A woman on the production team finally asked that the characters be two male and one female and Wakky and Smakky were merged into Wakko.)

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** More success was found with its successor shows, ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', The first has Babs Bunny, who was Buster's equal in every way, as well as Shirley The Loon, Fifi [=LaFume=], Rhubella Rat, Sweetie Pie, and so on. The second had Dot Warner (who was, of course, the only female Warner sibling, but she went to some effort to make sure she was not forgotten by adding "...and the Warner sister, Dot!" whenever an opportunity came up), Rita, Minerva Mink, Marita, and Slappy Squirrel. (Interestingly enough, the Warner Brothers were originally supposed to be a trio of ''brothers'' ''sisters'' (Smakky, Wakky, and Yakky), with a mischievous little brother character instead of Dot, who was only supposed to be a minor recurring character of "the Warner Cousin". A woman on the production team finally asked that the characters be two male and one female and Wakky and Smakky were merged into Wakko.)
16th Oct '16 12:18:25 PM Monolaf317
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15th Jun '16 1:14:22 AM EdnaWalker
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* The main protagonist of ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfNIMH'' is a female fieldmouse named Mrs. Brisby..

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* The main protagonist of ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfNIMH'' is a female fieldmouse named Mrs. Brisby..Brisby.
* The titular protagonist of ''WesternAnimation/FindingDory'' is a female Pacific regal blue tang.



** Minerva Mink is the main protagonist of her shorts, even though she is sexualized.

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** Minerva Mink is the main protagonist of her shorts, even though she is sexualized.a sexualizedHumanoidFemaleAnimal.
7th Feb '16 3:57:36 PM nombretomado
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One reason for the shortage of female animal characters was a DoubleStandard in GoldenAge animation against [[WouldntHitAGirl hitting a female character]]. Because of this DoubleStandard, this often meant that the characters "[[DudeNotFunny just couldn't be]]" girls. Because of this, the first few GoldenAge female animal characters were usually introduced as {{MacGuffin}}s for the male counterparts to pursue or fight over or [[DamselInDistress Damsels in Distress]] to saved by them (i.e., WesternAnimation/MinnieMouse and Daisy Duck).

to:

One reason for the shortage of female animal characters was a DoubleStandard in GoldenAge Golden Age animation against [[WouldntHitAGirl hitting a female character]]. Because of this DoubleStandard, this often meant that the characters "[[DudeNotFunny just couldn't be]]" girls. Because of this, the first few GoldenAge Golden Age female animal characters were usually introduced as {{MacGuffin}}s for the male counterparts to pursue or fight over or [[DamselInDistress Damsels in Distress]] to saved by them (i.e., WesternAnimation/MinnieMouse and Daisy Duck).



** Poor Penelope Pussycat. No one ever remembers her name. That's because she didn't have a name in the original WesternAnimation/PepeLePew cartoons -- or rather, she did, but it changed every cartoon. She was "Fabrette" on "Really Scent," Fifi in "Two Scents Worth," and other times, she was just a nameless cat who got painted and is left to be chased and harassed by this horny skunk. The only time she was named Penelope during {{the Golden Age of|Animation}} ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' was in 1954's "The Cat's Bah" (which is where they got the name of Penelope for her when she was brought back in "Carrotblanca.")

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** Poor Penelope Pussycat. No one ever remembers her name. That's because she didn't have a name in the original WesternAnimation/PepeLePew cartoons -- or rather, she did, but it changed every cartoon. She was "Fabrette" on "Really Scent," Fifi in "Two Scents Worth," and other times, she was just a nameless cat who got painted and is left to be chased and harassed by this horny skunk. The only time she was named Penelope during {{the UsefulNotes/{{the Golden Age of|Animation}} ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' was in 1954's "The Cat's Bah" (which is where they got the name of Penelope for her when she was brought back in "Carrotblanca.")
7th Feb '16 3:57:14 PM nombretomado
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Although there are examples of this going back much further than modern works (a Victorian example could be ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'', which lacks female animal characters entirely) this issue has another unique technical basis that may have also been at play. Animals don't talk, so animal-based characters were usually animated in visual media in the modern United States. [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Early]] on [[MostWritersAreMale most animators and writers were male]] and before [[http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retta_Scott Retta Scott]], Disney's first woman animator, came, ''all'' of Creator/{{Disney}}'s animators were male. Things are different these days but inertia has kept male animators in the majority (at least for another few years).

In [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation older animated cartoons and TV shows]] much of the early innovators were artists rather than authors, so the plotlines were sometimes secondary to an artist finding a way to get paid for their visual work. As a result many cartoons were written as comedies, and the easiest way to make a popular comedy at the time was to use [[Film/TheThreeStooges gratuitous slapstick]]. Since there was a DoubleStandard against [[WouldntHitAGirl hitting a female character]] this often meant that the characters "[[DudeNotFunny just couldn't be]]" girls unless they were {{MacGuffin}}s for the male counterparts to pursue or fight over.

to:

Although there are examples of this going back much further than modern works (a Victorian example could be ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'', which lacks female animal characters entirely) this issue has another unique technical basis that may have also been at play. Animals don't talk, so animal-based characters were usually animated in visual media in the modern United States. [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Early]] on [[MostWritersAreMale most animators and writers were male]] and before [[http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retta_Scott Retta Scott]], Disney's first woman animator, came, ''all'' of Creator/{{Disney}}'s animators were male. Things are different these days but inertia has kept male animators in the majority (at least for another few years).

In [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation older animated cartoons and TV shows]] much of the early innovators were artists rather than authors, so the plotlines were sometimes secondary to an artist finding a way to get paid for their visual work. As a result many cartoons were written as comedies, and the easiest way to make a popular comedy at the time was to use [[Film/TheThreeStooges gratuitous slapstick]]. Since there was a DoubleStandard against [[WouldntHitAGirl hitting a female character]] this often meant that the characters "[[DudeNotFunny just couldn't be]]" girls unless they were {{MacGuffin}}s for the male counterparts to pursue or fight over.
22nd Oct '15 4:30:12 PM nombretomado
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* The {{Disney}} theatrical short shown before the 2011 ''Disney/WinnieThePooh'' movie, "The Ballad of Nessie" features not only a female animal main protagonist, her name is part of the title of the short as well!

to:

* The {{Disney}} Creator/{{Disney}} theatrical short shown before the 2011 ''Disney/WinnieThePooh'' movie, "The Ballad of Nessie" features not only a female animal main protagonist, her name is part of the title of the short as well!
22nd Oct '15 4:30:03 PM nombretomado
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Although there are examples of this going back much further than modern works (a Victorian example could be ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'', which lacks female animal characters entirely) this issue has another unique technical basis that may have also been at play. Animals don't talk, so animal-based characters were usually animated in visual media in the modern United States. [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Early]] on [[MostWritersAreMale most animators and writers were male]] and before [[http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retta_Scott Retta Scott]], Disney's first woman animator, came, ''all'' of {{Disney}}'s animators were male. Things are different these days but inertia has kept male animators in the majority (at least for another few years).

to:

Although there are examples of this going back much further than modern works (a Victorian example could be ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'', which lacks female animal characters entirely) this issue has another unique technical basis that may have also been at play. Animals don't talk, so animal-based characters were usually animated in visual media in the modern United States. [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Early]] on [[MostWritersAreMale most animators and writers were male]] and before [[http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retta_Scott Retta Scott]], Disney's first woman animator, came, ''all'' of {{Disney}}'s Creator/{{Disney}}'s animators were male. Things are different these days but inertia has kept male animators in the majority (at least for another few years).
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