History Analysis / Sherlock

25th Mar '16 6:13:07 PM Doug86
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Perhaps the most obvious reason for this phenomenon is that the original Sherlock Holmes canon has itself inspired so many re-interpretations, involving everything from [[Anime/SherlockHound talking animals]] to [[AStudyInEmerald Lovecraftian abominations]] to [[WesternAnimation/VeggieTales sentient cucumbers]]. ''Sherlock'' itself is a derivative work that takes the basics of the original characters and places them in a different context. It is, essentially, a CrackFic in its own right.

to:

Perhaps the most obvious reason for this phenomenon is that the original Sherlock Holmes canon has itself inspired so many re-interpretations, involving everything from [[Anime/SherlockHound talking animals]] to [[AStudyInEmerald [[Literature/AStudyInEmerald Lovecraftian abominations]] to [[WesternAnimation/VeggieTales sentient cucumbers]]. ''Sherlock'' itself is a derivative work that takes the basics of the original characters and places them in a different context. It is, essentially, a CrackFic in its own right.
21st Jan '14 6:12:26 PM cavenglok
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There is, of course, no way that this awareness could ever be directly addressed in the show. Sherlock can never be made aware of the fact that he’s a 160-year-old literary character brought to life in the wrong century. It is to remain a collection of [[MythologyGag sly in-jokes and knowing winks from the creators]], something that the observant audience member will notice, but [[MST3KMantra not something really designed to be questioned or explored]] beyond “I see what they did there”. Moriarty is most probably, within the context of the ''Sherlock'' universe, just an insane criminal mastermind who ''thinks'' he’s the villain in a story. The fact that he’s right is just sheer coincidence. Probably.

to:

There is, of course, no way that this awareness could ever be directly addressed in the show. Sherlock can never be made aware of the fact that he’s a 160-year-old literary character brought to life in the wrong century. It is to remain a collection of [[MythologyGag sly in-jokes and knowing winks from the creators]], something that the observant audience member will notice, but [[MST3KMantra not something really designed to be questioned or explored]] beyond “I see what they did there”. Moriarty is most probably, within the context of the ''Sherlock'' universe, just an insane criminal mastermind who ''thinks'' he’s the villain in a story. The fact that he’s right is just sheer coincidence. Probably.
Probably. But as the Holmes boys say, "The universe is rarely so lazy."
3rd Jan '14 2:50:18 PM evildevilgirl02
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3rd Jan '14 10:27:41 AM Doodler
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By the end of the Reichenbach Fall, however, all these "inhuman" traits are deconstructed and ultimately subverted. Sherlock’s actions at the end of the episode reveal his compassion, vulnerability and humanity. John, [[spoiler standing at his grave]], calls Sherlock “the best man, the most human... human being ... that I've ever known.”

to:

By the end of the Reichenbach Fall, however, all these "inhuman" traits are deconstructed and ultimately subverted. Sherlock’s actions at the end of the episode reveal his compassion, vulnerability and humanity. John, [[spoiler [[spoiler: standing at his grave]], calls Sherlock “the best man, the most human... human being ... that I've ever known.”
21st Sep '13 2:10:24 PM MarkLungo
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A peculiar trait of the ''Sherlock'' fandom is its seemingly limitless creativity in creating fanart or fanfiction taking place in “alternate universes”. From [[EverythingsWetterWithOtters woodland animals]] to ballet dancers to [[Film/TheHobbit hobbits and dragons]], the fandom seems determined to transform Sherlock and John into anything and everything other than a consulting detective and an army doctor. Why does this happen? There may, in fact, be a valid reason for this occurrence…

to:

A peculiar trait of the ''Sherlock'' fandom is its seemingly limitless creativity in creating fanart or fanfiction taking place in “alternate universes”. From [[EverythingsWetterWithOtters woodland animals]] to ballet dancers to [[Film/TheHobbit hobbits and dragons]], the fandom seems determined to transform Sherlock Franchise/SherlockHolmes and John Watson into anything and everything other than a consulting detective and an army doctor. Why does this happen? There may, in fact, be a valid reason for this occurrence…



There are also elements of [[SuperheroTropes superhero stories,]] particularly in the first episode, with all this talk about Sherlock having an “arch-nemesis”. Moriarty’s camp, [[EvilIsHammy hammy,]] [[CardCarryingVillain card-carrying villain]] persona, meanwhile, is separated from Saturday morning cartoon baddies only by his terrifying ''[[BewareTheSillyOnes competence]]''. The SherlockScan, too, is subject to superhero tropes, including PowerIncontinence (Sherlock can’t turn it off) as well as a sort of KryptoniteFactor (when he meets [[NakedFirstImpression Irene Adler]]). John’s blog, in fact, has an entire case centered around comic books and super heroes (the comments on the post reveal the appreciative client’s intent to create a comic book based on Sherlock and John’s adventures; a fun little nod to the official manga adaptation.) [[note]]As a side note, it’s interesting to contrast the portrayal of Holmes’s deductive abilities here with rival series ''{{Elementary}}''. ''Sherlock'' portrays his abilities as a mostly inherent talent, a borderline superpower that ordinary folks could never hope to match, while ''Elementary'' places a heavy focus on real-life memory and observation techniques, implying strongly that Holmes-like abilities are attainable if one is prepared to put extensive time and effort into honing them (the mental equivalent of CharlesAtlasSuperpower, perhaps).[[/note]]

to:

There are also elements of [[SuperheroTropes superhero stories,]] particularly in the first episode, with all this talk about Sherlock having an “arch-nemesis”. Moriarty’s camp, [[EvilIsHammy hammy,]] [[CardCarryingVillain card-carrying villain]] persona, meanwhile, is separated from Saturday morning cartoon baddies only by his terrifying ''[[BewareTheSillyOnes competence]]''. The SherlockScan, too, is subject to superhero tropes, including PowerIncontinence (Sherlock can’t turn it off) as well as a sort of KryptoniteFactor (when he meets [[NakedFirstImpression Irene Adler]]). John’s blog, in fact, has an entire case centered around comic books and super heroes (the comments on the post reveal the appreciative client’s intent to create a comic book based on Sherlock and John’s adventures; a fun little nod to the official manga adaptation.) [[note]]As a side note, it’s interesting to contrast the portrayal of Holmes’s deductive abilities here with rival series ''{{Elementary}}''.''Series/{{Elementary}}''. ''Sherlock'' portrays his abilities as a mostly inherent talent, a borderline superpower that ordinary folks could never hope to match, while ''Elementary'' places a heavy focus on real-life memory and observation techniques, implying strongly that Holmes-like abilities are attainable if one is prepared to put extensive time and effort into honing them (the mental equivalent of CharlesAtlasSuperpower, perhaps).[[/note]]


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9th Jul '13 8:26:15 PM Doryna
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''Sherlock'' was developed by the creative team behind the current series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', and it shows. ''Sherlock'' has yet to include an explicit reference to its sister show, but there are plenty of [[CreatorThumbprint familiar touches]], particularly of the [[HighOctaneNightmareFuel psychological horror]] variety.

to:

''Sherlock'' was developed by the creative team behind the current series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', and it shows. ''Sherlock'' has yet to include an explicit reference to its sister show, but there are plenty of [[CreatorThumbprint familiar touches]], particularly of the [[HighOctaneNightmareFuel [[NightmareFuel psychological horror]] variety.
6th Jul '13 4:51:01 PM PapercutChainsaw
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By the end of the Reichenbach Fall, however, all these "inhuman" traits are deconstructed and ultimately subverted. Sherlock’s actions at the end of the episode reveal his compassion, vulnerability and humanity. John, standing at his grave, calls Sherlock “the best man, the most human... human being ... that I've ever known.”

to:

By the end of the Reichenbach Fall, however, all these "inhuman" traits are deconstructed and ultimately subverted. Sherlock’s actions at the end of the episode reveal his compassion, vulnerability and humanity. John, [[spoiler standing at his grave, grave]], calls Sherlock “the best man, the most human... human being ... that I've ever known.”
6th Jul '13 4:15:56 AM PapercutChainsaw
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Perhaps the most obvious reason for this phenomenon is that the original Sherlock Holmes canon has itself inspired so many re-interpretations, involving everything from [[Anime/SherlockHound talking animals]] to {{Eldritch Abomination}}s to [[WesternAnimation/VeggieTales sentient cucumbers]]. ''Sherlock'' itself is a derivative work that takes the basics of the original characters and places them in a different context. It is, essentially, a CrackFic in its own right.

to:

Perhaps the most obvious reason for this phenomenon is that the original Sherlock Holmes canon has itself inspired so many re-interpretations, involving everything from [[Anime/SherlockHound talking animals]] to {{Eldritch Abomination}}s [[AStudyInEmerald Lovecraftian abominations]] to [[WesternAnimation/VeggieTales sentient cucumbers]]. ''Sherlock'' itself is a derivative work that takes the basics of the original characters and places them in a different context. It is, essentially, a CrackFic in its own right.
6th Jul '13 4:13:50 AM PapercutChainsaw
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There is, of course, no way that this awareness could ever be directly addressed in the show. Sherlock can never be made aware of the fact that he’s a 160-year-old literary character brought to life in the wrong century. It is to remain a collection of [[MythologyGag sly in-jokes and knowing winks from the creators]], something that the observant audience member will notice, but [[MST3KMantra not something really designed to be questioned or explored]] beyond “I see what they did there”. Moriarty is most probably, within the context of the ''Sherlock'' universe, just an insane criminal mastermind who thinks he’s the villain in a story. The fact that he’s right is just sheer coincidence. Probably.

to:

There is, of course, no way that this awareness could ever be directly addressed in the show. Sherlock can never be made aware of the fact that he’s a 160-year-old literary character brought to life in the wrong century. It is to remain a collection of [[MythologyGag sly in-jokes and knowing winks from the creators]], something that the observant audience member will notice, but [[MST3KMantra not something really designed to be questioned or explored]] beyond “I see what they did there”. Moriarty is most probably, within the context of the ''Sherlock'' universe, just an insane criminal mastermind who thinks ''thinks'' he’s the villain in a story. The fact that he’s right is just sheer coincidence. Probably.



''Sherlock'' is one of those shows that is extremely difficult to pin down into a single genre. “Crime thriller” and “Detective story” just don’t do it justice. Looking at the fan output alone, one could quite easily be forgiven for assuming it was, for example a [[BlackComedy dark]] [[ShipTease romantic comedy]], a delightful [[{{Bowdlerize}} series of children’s picture books]] about a clever little [[EverythingsWetterWithOtters otter]], or [[BreadEggsMilkSquick hardcore]] [[{{Rule 34}} pornography]] [[note]](this author has thankfully yet to confirm the existence of fanwork that incorporates all three of these elements, but is willing to bet that it does or will exist somewhere)[[/note]]. It may or may not qualify as {{speculative fiction}} in its own right, but the allusions to other stories and genres, together with metafictional elements that reference the source material and tap gently on the fourth wall have helped to create a world that is familiar yet new, hilarious yet terrifying, and all in all, just as rich, entertaining and flexible as Conan Doyle’s original work.

to:

''Sherlock'' is one of those shows that is [[GenreBusting extremely difficult to pin down into a single genre.genre]]. “Crime thriller” and “Detective story” just don’t do it justice. Looking at the fan output alone, one could quite easily be forgiven for assuming it was, for example example, a [[BlackComedy dark]] [[ShipTease romantic comedy]], a delightful [[{{Bowdlerize}} series of children’s picture books]] about a clever little [[EverythingsWetterWithOtters otter]], or [[BreadEggsMilkSquick hardcore]] [[{{Rule 34}} pornography]] [[note]](this author has thankfully yet to confirm the existence of fanwork that incorporates all three of these elements, but is willing to bet that it does or will exist somewhere)[[/note]].somewhere in the depths of the Internet)[[/note]]. It may or may not qualify as {{speculative fiction}} in its own right, but the allusions to other stories and genres, together with metafictional elements that reference the source material and tap gently on the fourth wall have helped to create a world that is familiar yet new, hilarious yet terrifying, and all in all, just as rich, entertaining and flexible as Conan Doyle’s original work.
6th Jul '13 4:09:19 AM PapercutChainsaw
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''Sherlock'' is one of those shows that is extremely difficult to pin down into a single genre. “Crime thriller” and “Detective story” just don’t do it justice. Looking at the fan output alone, one could quite easily be forgiven for assuming it was, for example a [[BlackComedy dark]] [[ShipTease romantic comedy]], a delightful [[{{Bowlderization}} series of children’s picture books]] about a clever little [[EverythingsWetterWithOtters otter]], or [[BreadEggsMilkSquick hardcore]] [[{{Rule 34}} pornography]] [[note]](this author has thankfully yet to confirm the existence of fanwork that incorporates all three of these elements, but is willing to bet that it does or will exist somewhere)[[/note]]. It may or may not qualify as {{speculative fiction}} in its own right, but the allusions to other stories and genres, together with metafictional elements that reference the source material and tap gently on the fourth wall have helped to create a world that is familiar yet new, hilarious yet terrifying, and all in all, just as rich, entertaining and flexible as Conan Doyle’s original work.

to:

''Sherlock'' is one of those shows that is extremely difficult to pin down into a single genre. “Crime thriller” and “Detective story” just don’t do it justice. Looking at the fan output alone, one could quite easily be forgiven for assuming it was, for example a [[BlackComedy dark]] [[ShipTease romantic comedy]], a delightful [[{{Bowlderization}} [[{{Bowdlerize}} series of children’s picture books]] about a clever little [[EverythingsWetterWithOtters otter]], or [[BreadEggsMilkSquick hardcore]] [[{{Rule 34}} pornography]] [[note]](this author has thankfully yet to confirm the existence of fanwork that incorporates all three of these elements, but is willing to bet that it does or will exist somewhere)[[/note]]. It may or may not qualify as {{speculative fiction}} in its own right, but the allusions to other stories and genres, together with metafictional elements that reference the source material and tap gently on the fourth wall have helped to create a world that is familiar yet new, hilarious yet terrifying, and all in all, just as rich, entertaining and flexible as Conan Doyle’s original work.
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