History Analysis / PushingDaisies

9th Oct '10 12:45:27 PM Nightsky
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The most obvious, of course, is Ned and Chuck's inability to touch, which seems to serve as a metaphor for the difficulty being experienced by two adults trying to connect despite having different--in fact, complementary--intimacy issues. In fact, all of the principal characters have problems establishing and maintaining intimacy, and none had especially happy childhoods.

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The most obvious, of course, is Ned and Chuck's inability to touch, which seems to serve as a metaphor for the difficulty being experienced by two adults trying to connect despite having different--in fact, complementary--intimacy issues. In fact, all of the principal characters have problems establishing and maintaining intimacy, and none had an especially happy childhoods.childhood.



It's no surprise; he was ''intended'' to be. But the image isn't always flattering to Ned, which makes it all the more surprising that Ned is able to embrace it before the end of "Frescorts", Randy's first episode.

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It's no surprise; he was ''intended'' to be. But the image isn't always flattering to Ned, which makes it all the more surprising that Ned is able to embrace it before the end of "Frescorts", "[[Recap/PushingDaisiesS2E4Frescorts Frescorts]]", Randy's first episode.



* Because of their unusual interests in death and life after death, both perceive themselves as extremely odd and not worth loving. Each immediately recognizes this aspect of himself in the other man, and in both cases it triggers a healthy re-evaluation of self: they each realize that they're not ''that'' strange. It's even made explicit: at the end of "Frescorts", Ned tells Randy to embrace his own uniqueness; at the end of "Robbing Hood", it's Randy's mention that "people who have superpowers don't ''not'' want to use them" that has Ned, once and for all, finally accept his ability.

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* Because of their unusual interests in death and life after death, both perceive themselves as extremely odd and not worth loving. Each immediately recognizes this aspect of himself in the other man, and in both cases it triggers a healthy re-evaluation of self: they each realize that they're not ''that'' strange. It's even made explicit: at the end of "Frescorts", "[[Recap/PushingDaisiesS2E4Frescorts Frescorts]]", Ned tells Randy to embrace his own uniqueness; at the end of "Robbing Hood", "[[Recap/PushingDaisiesS2E11WindowDressedToKill Window Dressed to Kill]]", it's Randy's mention that "people who have superpowers don't ''not'' want to use them" that has makes Ned, once and for all, finally accept his ability.
9th Oct '10 12:37:35 PM Nightsky
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* Both men grew up lonely; as adults, they had extremely limited abilities to form and maintain friendships.
* Both perceive themselves as extremely odd and not worth loving. Each recognizes this aspect of himself in the other man, and in both cases it triggers a healthy re-evaluation of self: they each realize that they're not ''that'' strange.

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* Both men grew up lonely; as adults, they had extremely limited abilities to form and maintain friendships.
* Both perceive themselves as extremely odd and not worth loving. Each recognizes this aspect of himself in the other man, and in both cases it triggers a healthy re-evaluation of self: they
friendships. The first real friendship for each realize that they're not ''that'' strange. of them was with a business associate.


Added DiffLines:

* Because of their unusual interests in death and life after death, both perceive themselves as extremely odd and not worth loving. Each immediately recognizes this aspect of himself in the other man, and in both cases it triggers a healthy re-evaluation of self: they each realize that they're not ''that'' strange. It's even made explicit: at the end of "Frescorts", Ned tells Randy to embrace his own uniqueness; at the end of "Robbing Hood", it's Randy's mention that "people who have superpowers don't ''not'' want to use them" that has Ned, once and for all, finally accept his ability.
9th Oct '10 12:21:11 PM Nightsky
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While the world of ''PushingDaisies'' isn't intended to be realistic, it isn't a SupernaturalSoapOpera, either. In fact, there's really only one extra-normal aspect to it: Ned's power. The nature and origin of Ned's ability isn't explored in the show, but it's interesting that ''everyone''--including and especially Ned himself--consistently and exclusively characterizes it as "magic". Ned even links his ability to his father's and half-brothers' talent at stage magic.

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While the world of ''PushingDaisies'' isn't intended to be realistic, it isn't a SupernaturalSoapOpera, either. In fact, there's really only one ''one'' extra-normal aspect to it: Ned's power. The nature and origin of Ned's ability isn't explored is purposefully left ambiguous in the show, but it's interesting that ''everyone''--including and especially Ned himself--consistently and exclusively characterizes it as "magic". Ned even links his ability to his father's and half-brothers' talent at stage magic.magic.

!Randy Mann as Ned's mirror reflection
It's no surprise; he was ''intended'' to be. But the image isn't always flattering to Ned, which makes it all the more surprising that Ned is able to embrace it before the end of "Frescorts", Randy's first episode.
* Both men grew up lonely; as adults, they had extremely limited abilities to form and maintain friendships.
* Both perceive themselves as extremely odd and not worth loving. Each recognizes this aspect of himself in the other man, and in both cases it triggers a healthy re-evaluation of self: they each realize that they're not ''that'' strange.
* Both are identified with death. In fact, both are capable of sustaining life after death: Ned more literally than Randy. The not-very-flattering aspect to this that Randy shows Ned for the first time is that it amounts to clinging to an illusion of life.
8th Oct '10 11:12:50 PM Nightsky
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----
<<|Analysis/{{Analysis}}|>>

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<<|Analysis/{{Analysis}}|>>
!Magic in the ''PushingDaisies'' world
While the world of ''PushingDaisies'' isn't intended to be realistic, it isn't a SupernaturalSoapOpera, either. In fact, there's really only one extra-normal aspect to it: Ned's power. The nature and origin of Ned's ability isn't explored in the show, but it's interesting that ''everyone''--including and especially Ned himself--consistently and exclusively characterizes it as "magic". Ned even links his ability to his father's and half-brothers' talent at stage magic.
8th Oct '10 11:05:04 PM Nightsky
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Chuck betrays Ned's trust several times, and in increasingly serious ways: in the very first episode, leaving Ned's apartment against his explicit wishes; then, harmless and anonymous contact with her aunts, via the pies; early in season 2, crank-calling Lily; finally--and most devastatingly--keeping her father alive. Was she acting in ways that would ultimately serve Ned's best interests, or being unforgivably selfish?

to:

Chuck betrays Ned's trust several times, and in increasingly serious ways: in the very first episode, leaving Ned's apartment against his explicit wishes; then, harmless and anonymous contact with her aunts, via the pies; early in season 2, crank-calling Lily; finally--and most devastatingly--keeping her father alive. Was she acting in ways that would ultimately serve Ned's best interests, by demonstrating to him that his fears were baseless, or was she being unforgivably selfish?
19th Aug '10 1:36:10 PM Nightsky
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#Olive was from a wealthy family, but neglected and unloved. As an adult, she focused her love on someone unable to return it (Ned) and couldn't see love that ''was'' offered (Alfredo).
#Ned's childhood was idyllic--until his power manifested, and cost him everything he loved at once.
#Chuck was raised by loving but overprotective and needy aunts, and her filial responsibilities kept her from living her own life.
#Even Emerson, the only main character to have a warm relationship with his parent(s) as an adult, confesses to having "the whole set" of childhood issues, and Calista Cod seems to have always related better to her son as a friend than as a parent, even when he was a child and ''needed'' a parent.

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#Olive *Olive was from a wealthy family, but neglected and unloved. As an adult, she focused her love on someone unable to return it (Ned) and couldn't see love that ''was'' offered (Alfredo).
#Ned's *Ned's childhood was idyllic--until his power manifested, and cost him everything he loved at once.
#Chuck was raised by loving but overprotective and needy aunts, and her filial responsibilities kept her from living her own life.
once. Adult Ned lived in self-imposed isolation, too afraid to love lest he lose it all again.
#Even *Chuck was raised by loving but overprotective and needy aunts, and her filial responsibilities kept her from living her own life.
*Even
Emerson, the only main character to have a warm relationship with his parent(s) as an adult, confesses to having "the whole set" of childhood issues, and Calista Cod seems to have always related better to her son as a friend than as a parent, even when he was a child and ''needed'' a parent.
17th Aug '10 2:21:36 PM Nightsky
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The most obvious, of course, is Ned and Chuck's inability to touch, which seems to serve as a metaphor for the difficulty being experienced by two adults trying to connect despite having different--in fact, complementary--intimacy issues. In fact, all of the principal characters have problems establishing and maintaining intimacy, and none had especially happy childhoods. Olive was from a wealthy family, but neglected and unloved. Ned's childhood was idyllic--until his power manifested, and cost him everything he loved at once. Chuck was raised by loving but overprotective and needy aunts, and her filial responsibilities kept her from living her own life. Even Emerson, the only main character to have a warm relationship with his parent(s) as an adult, confesses to having "the whole set" of childhood issues, and Calista Cod seems to have always related better to her son as a friend than as a parent, even when he was a child and ''needed'' a parent.

to:

The most obvious, of course, is Ned and Chuck's inability to touch, which seems to serve as a metaphor for the difficulty being experienced by two adults trying to connect despite having different--in fact, complementary--intimacy issues. In fact, all of the principal characters have problems establishing and maintaining intimacy, and none had especially happy childhoods. Olive
#Olive
was from a wealthy family, but neglected and unloved. Ned's unloved. As an adult, she focused her love on someone unable to return it (Ned) and couldn't see love that ''was'' offered (Alfredo).
#Ned's
childhood was idyllic--until his power manifested, and cost him everything he loved at once. Chuck once.
#Chuck
was raised by loving but overprotective and needy aunts, and her filial responsibilities kept her from living her own life. Even life.
#Even
Emerson, the only main character to have a warm relationship with his parent(s) as an adult, confesses to having "the whole set" of childhood issues, and Calista Cod seems to have always related better to her son as a friend than as a parent, even when he was a child and ''needed'' a parent.
2nd Aug '10 2:35:56 PM Nightsky
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!Free Will

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!Free !Chuck vs. Free Will



Chuck betrays Ned's trust several times, and in increasingly serious ways: in the very first episode, leaving Ned's apartment against his express wishes; then, harmless, anonymous contact with her aunts, via the pies; crank-calling Lily early in season 2; finally and most devastatingly, keeping her father alive. Was she acting in ways that would ultimately serve Ned's best interests, or being unforgivably selfish?

to:

Chuck betrays Ned's trust several times, and in increasingly serious ways: in the very first episode, leaving Ned's apartment against his express explicit wishes; then, harmless, harmless and anonymous contact with her aunts, via the pies; crank-calling Lily early in season 2; finally and 2, crank-calling Lily; finally--and most devastatingly, keeping devastatingly--keeping her father alive. Was she acting in ways that would ultimately serve Ned's best interests, or being unforgivably selfish?
2nd Aug '10 2:32:49 PM Nightsky
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!Intimacy issues

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!Intimacy issuesissues and their roots in childhood



Ironically, the death that hangs most heavily on Ned's conscience is the one he could not possibly have foreseen: Charles Charles, Chuck's father, in exchange for his mother's life. Ned only seems mildly guilty over the funeral home director's death (saying, in "The Fun in Funeral", that he was absolutely sure he had made the right choice in keeping Chuck alive ''even knowing what would happen''), whereas Charles Charles' death affects Ned so profoundly that he struggles with overwhelming guilt for years, and even claims (to Chuck, early in season 2) that he would never have brought his mother back if he'd known the price.

to:

Ironically, the death that hangs most heavily on Ned's conscience is the one he could not possibly have foreseen: foreseen or prevented: Charles Charles, Chuck's father, in exchange for his mother's life. Ned only seems mildly guilty over the funeral home director's death (saying, in "The Fun in Funeral", that he was absolutely sure he had made the right choice in keeping Chuck alive ''even knowing what would happen''), whereas Charles Charles' death affects Ned so profoundly that he struggles with overwhelming guilt for years, and even claims (to Chuck, early in season 2) that he would never have brought his mother back if he'd known the price.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Analysis.PushingDaisies