History Analysis / Monster

16th Oct '16 2:02:25 PM Monolaf317
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Tenma's resolution, then, comes in his decision to once again save Johan's life. Here, he can finally accept that it was never wrong for him to have done so in the first place and that trying to help others, no matter their faults, is not wrong. There are no monsters, there are only monstrous actions.

to:

Tenma's resolution, then, comes in his decision to once again save Johan's life. Here, he can finally accept that it was never wrong for him to have done so in the first place and that trying to help others, no matter their faults, is not wrong. There are no monsters, there are only monstrous actions.actions.
----
26th Sep '16 4:59:54 PM Angewomon
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* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And in all likelihood...he probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a mixed message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. Their basic personalities are quite different, and I would guess that Nina's optimism and ability to trust helped save her too. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That just isn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And in all likelihood...he probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a mixed message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. Their basic personalities are quite different, and I would guess that Nina's optimism and ability to trust helped save her too. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. Traumatized or not, [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That that just isn't normal]].a normal reaction for a child to have]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.
26th Sep '16 4:57:58 PM Angewomon
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* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And in all likelihood...he probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That kind of behavior just isn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And in all likelihood...he probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive mixed message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, Their basic personalities are quite different, and I would guess that Nina's optimism and ability to trust, and empathy.trust helped save her too. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That kind of behavior just isn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.
25th Sep '16 12:22:47 PM Angewomon
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* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And in all likelihood...he probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.
* Now, as far as if Johan ever snapped as a child, Ninaís recollections at the ďVampireís HouseĒ can be taken as evidence that he cried at least ''once'' shortly after Nina came home from the Red Rose Mansion. This reflects a general pattern: You typically donít get to see Johan cry or break down. Rather, itís only implied. The only exceptions are during a certain conversation with Karl (which is dubious in its sincerity) and that one moment in the library where he fainted (which is meant to be NightmareFuel). This was done of course because NothingIsScarier, but itís also an important way of maintaining the illusion of Johan being inhuman. Throughout the story, Johan is described as monstrous and otherworldly. And with the way he is presented, that notion becomes believable. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion. But in the end, Johan is a human being. Not a monster. Not a demon. Not TheAntichrist ([[MemeticMutation as much we all love to joke about it]]). ''A human being.'' People may debate on what his true nature and motivations are until the end of time, but how he came to be isn't a mystery. He experienced life, developed his own way of thinking and responding to the world, and made his own decisions just like the rest of us.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And in all likelihood...he probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response kind of behavior just wasn't isn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.
* Now, as far as if Johan ever snapped as a child, Ninaís recollections at the ďVampireís HouseĒ can be taken as evidence that he cried at least ''once'' shortly after Nina came home from the Red Rose Mansion. This reflects a general pattern: You typically donít get to see Johan cry or break down. Rather, itís only implied. The only exceptions are during a certain conversation with Karl (which is dubious in its sincerity) and that one moment in the library where he fainted (which is meant to be NightmareFuel). This was done of course because NothingIsScarier, but itís also an important way of maintaining the illusion of Johan being inhuman. Throughout the story, Johan is described as monstrous and otherworldly. And with the way he is presented, that notion becomes believable. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion. But in the end, Johan is a supposed to be a human being. Not a monster. Not a demon. Not TheAntichrist ([[MemeticMutation as much we all love to joke about it]]). ''A human being.'' People may debate on what his true nature and motivations are until the end of time, but how he came to be isn't a mystery. He experienced life, developed his own way of thinking and responding to the world, and made his own decisions just like the rest of us.
[[HumansAreTheRealMonsters And maybe that's what's really so frightening about him]].
25th Sep '16 12:11:06 PM Angewomon
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* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...he feared it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...in all likelihood...he feared probably thought it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' didn't remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' she didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.
25th Sep '16 12:08:47 PM Angewomon
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* Now, as far as if Johan ever snapped as a child, Ninaís recollections at the ďVampireís HouseĒ can be taken as evidence that he cried at least ''once'' shortly after Nina came home from the Red Rose Mansion. This reflects a general pattern: You typically donít get to see Johan cry or break down. Rather, itís only implied. The only exceptions are during a certain conversation with Karl (which is dubious in its sincerity) and that one moment in the library where he fainted (which is meant to be NightmareFuel). This was done of course because NothingIsScarier, but itís also an important way of maintaining the illusion of Johan being inhuman. Throughout the story, Johan is described as monstrous and otherworldly. And with the way he is presented, that notion becomes believable. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion. But in the end, Johan is a human being. Not a monster. Not a demon. Not TheAntichrist ([[MemeticMutation as much we all love to joke about it]]). ''A human being.'' People may debate on what his nature and true motivations are until the end of time,


to:

* Now, as far as if Johan ever snapped as a child, Ninaís recollections at the ďVampireís HouseĒ can be taken as evidence that he cried at least ''once'' shortly after Nina came home from the Red Rose Mansion. This reflects a general pattern: You typically donít get to see Johan cry or break down. Rather, itís only implied. The only exceptions are during a certain conversation with Karl (which is dubious in its sincerity) and that one moment in the library where he fainted (which is meant to be NightmareFuel). This was done of course because NothingIsScarier, but itís also an important way of maintaining the illusion of Johan being inhuman. Throughout the story, Johan is described as monstrous and otherworldly. And with the way he is presented, that notion becomes believable. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion. But in the end, Johan is a human being. Not a monster. Not a demon. Not TheAntichrist ([[MemeticMutation as much we all love to joke about it]]). ''A human being.'' People may debate on what his true nature and true motivations are until the end of time,

time, but how he came to be isn't a mystery. He experienced life, developed his own way of thinking and responding to the world, and made his own decisions just like the rest of us.
25th Sep '16 12:03:17 PM Angewomon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...he feared it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one.

Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.

Johan is built up to be something [[CompleteMonster inhuman]]. An atmosphere is created in the story in which maintains that illusion. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...he feared it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a positive message and Johan ended up with a negative one. \n\n Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences, the most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]]. Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself. \n\n
* Now, as far as if Johan ever snapped as a child, Ninaís recollections at the ďVampireís HouseĒ can be taken as evidence that he cried at least ''once'' shortly after Nina came home from the Red Rose Mansion. This reflects a general pattern: You typically donít get to see Johan cry or break down. Rather, itís only implied. The only exceptions are during a certain conversation with Karl (which is dubious in its sincerity) and that one moment in the library where he fainted (which is meant to be NightmareFuel). This was done of course because NothingIsScarier, but itís also an important way of maintaining the illusion of Johan being inhuman. Throughout the story,
Johan is built up to be something [[CompleteMonster inhuman]]. An atmosphere is created in described as monstrous and otherworldly. And with the story in which maintains way he is presented, that illusion.notion becomes believable. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion.
emotion. But in the end, Johan is a human being. Not a monster. Not a demon. Not TheAntichrist ([[MemeticMutation as much we all love to joke about it]]). ''A human being.'' People may debate on what his nature and true motivations are until the end of time,

25th Sep '16 11:44:14 AM Angewomon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...he feared it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So Nina ended up with a slight positive message in the end and Johan ended up with a largely negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. There are clear personality differences between the two. Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]].

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...he feared it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret the dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So in the end, Nina ended up with a slight positive message in the end and Johan ended up with a largely negative one. one.

Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. There are It's heavily implied that there's something "special" about Johan, and even though Nina is his sister, I don't believe she has the capacity to become a monster of the same magnitude as her brother. They have clear personality differences between differences, the two. most important of which were probably in levels of optimism, ability to trust, and empathy. At the end of the day, Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]]. \n Nina was able to open herself up again to a degree and try to move on. Johan couldn't, and he couldn't allow himself to care about anyone else other than his sister and himself.

Johan is built up to be something [[CompleteMonster inhuman]]. An atmosphere is created in the story in which maintains that illusion. We never get to see him do anything normal or mundane. Most of the time we only get to know of his abilities and acts from secondhand sources. And above all, we rarely see him express any genuine emotion.
25th Sep '16 11:24:58 AM Angewomon
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* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. There are clear personality differences between the two. Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all her terror it must have left an impression on her subconscious.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan and Nina's experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. (And most likely...he feared it was ''him.'') Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. So Nina ended up with a slight positive message in the end and Johan ended up with a largely negative one. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. There are clear personality differences between the two. Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all her the terror she experienced she still felt that her life was worth enough to keep pressing on. If the situation was reversed and it must had been Johan who had been sent instead, it would be less certain as to whether or not Johan would have left an impression bought it. It could have saved him or it could have had no effect at all. Furthermore, even without having heard Bonaparta's message, Johan had many, many opportunities to try and have a normal life. He could have chosen to let Nina be a good influence on her subconscious.
him...but he didn't. Instead, he killed the first pair of adults who tried to help them and never turned back. [[TroublingUnchildhoodBehavior That response just wasn't normal]].
25th Sep '16 11:04:58 AM Angewomon
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* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may not see any one moment onscreen where Johan snapped as a child, but if we take Nina's recollections at the "Vampire's House" as evidence, he cried at least ''once'' after the Red Rose Mansion incident.

to:

* Just as it is in RealLife, it's likely [[TakeAThirdOption both]] nature ''and'' nurture. We may not see any one moment onscreen where assume that heís merely a product of his environment or destined to be a monster, but neither explanation alone is sufficient. Regarding Johan snapped as a child, but if we take and Nina's recollections experiences, there were small differences in what they focused on and remembered. Johan remembered their mother switching them at the "Vampire's House" as evidence, he cried at least ''once'' after last minute, which left him wondering who was actually unwanted. Nina ''didn't'' remember that, but she was told by Franz Bonaparta that they were "precious jewels" that mustn't become monsters. Depending on how you interpret dialogue, Nina may have implied that this was the Red Rose Mansion incident.
reason ''she'' didn't become a monster. Johan most likely wasn't told that because Nina was too shaken to talk about anything but her trauma. Now are these differences the only reason why they turned out the way they did? Of course not. There are clear personality differences between the two. Nina didn't have to believe what Bonaparta said. In fact, she had absolutely ''zero'' reason to. And yet a part of her must have, since even through all her terror it must have left an impression on her subconscious.
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