History AlternativeCharacterInterpretation / Film

14th Jan '18 9:21:04 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/SplitSecond'': About the creature and its origins, since a] it never talks, and b] all information about it is pure speculation by the main characters. Is it a shapeshifting human serial killer? Some sort of rat-demon from hell? A predatory space alien similar to the polymorph from ''Series/RedDwarf''?
13th Jan '18 9:36:44 PM erforce
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* ''Film/XMen'':

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* ''Film/XMen'':''Film/XMenFilmSeries''



* Film/ZorbaTheGreek: Zorba! Is he a well-meaning if somewhat irresponsible fellow who lives in the present or a selfish con man who calls for living life to the fullest with no thought to the consequences as long as it is at the expense of others? The latter can be found in his conning the monks out of the forest by faking a miracle, spending all of Basil's money on women and booze, an encouraging Basil to pursue the widow despite knowing how tense the situation in the villains was.

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* Film/ZorbaTheGreek: ''Film/ZorbaTheGreek'': Zorba! Is he a well-meaning if somewhat irresponsible fellow who lives in the present or a selfish con man who calls for living life to the fullest with no thought to the consequences as long as it is at the expense of others? The latter can be found in his conning the monks out of the forest by faking a miracle, spending all of Basil's money on women and booze, an encouraging Basil to pursue the widow despite knowing how tense the situation in the villains was.
13th Jan '18 12:59:37 PM avalander
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[[folder:#0-9]]

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* HAL 9000 from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. WordOfGod said that he went kill-crazy because he was given conflicting orders about how to treat the crew members. There are two other theories for his motives: he was aware he was going to crash/go nuts and was trying to drop hints to Dave to figure out the secret purpose of the mission; or he, being a perfect computer, felt threatened by the monolith and wanted to keep mankind from ac

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* HAL 9000 from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. WordOfGod said that he went kill-crazy because he was given conflicting orders about how to treat the crew members. There are two other theories for his motives: he was aware he was going to crash/go nuts and was trying to drop hints to Dave to figure out the secret purpose of the mission; or he, being a perfect computer, felt threatened by the monolith and wanted to keep mankind from acacquiring it and reaching a point in evolution where they don't need tools like himself. Naturally, the film itself gives no hints at all.
** HAL screws up at chess early on in the film. He announces that it is checkmate in two moves. It's actually three. Kubrick was a chess enthusiast (the character Dr. Smyslov was named after a Russian chess champion, and the piece positions in question were from a famous 1910 game), so there's a good chance he put the goof in intentionally. Was it an early hint that there was something wrong with HAL? Was HAL testing his opponent to gauge how observant he was, and if he was willing to question HAL's claims? Or was he indeed dropping intentional clues that something was wrong with him, but this one proved too subtle?
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8th Dec '17 2:11:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/CubeZero'': About Jax, the head TheMenInBlack villain. Given his whole spiel about "observing the observers" and being seen answering the phone to talk to an unseen boss of his, how much of a willing enforcer is he in the grand scheme of things? Also, is he purely sadistic, or does he [[WorthyOpponent respect Wynn]] in some odd way? His final speech, while clearly trolling him at first, can be read various ways.
14th Nov '17 5:09:17 AM UchuuFlamenco
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** The ''Anime/Animatrix'' "Second Renaissance" series: {{Anvilicious}} HumansAreBastards message, or subtle "Machines Are Blatant Liars"?

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** The ''Anime/Animatrix'' "Second Renaissance" ''Anime/TheAnimatrix'' ''Second Renaissance'' series: {{Anvilicious}} HumansAreBastards message, or subtle "Machines Are Blatant Liars"?
8th Nov '17 11:05:35 AM UchuuFlamenco
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* Opinions on whether Poppy from ''Film/HappyGoLucky''is healthily happy or an annoying maniac vary widely.

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* Opinions on whether Poppy from ''Film/HappyGoLucky''is ''Film/HappyGoLucky'' is healthily happy or an annoying maniac vary widely.



* HAL 9000 from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. WordOfGod said that he went kill-crazy because he was given conflicting orders about how to treat the crew members. There are two other theories for his motives: he was aware he was going to crash/go nuts and was trying to drop hints to Dave to figure out the secret purpose of the mission; or he, being a perfect computer, felt threatened by the monolith and wanted to keep mankind from acquiring it and reaching a point in evolution where they don't need tools like himself. Naturally, the film itself gives no hints at all.
** HAL screws up at chess early on in the film. He announces that it is checkmate in two moves. It's actually three. Kubrick was a chess enthusiast (the character Dr. Smyslov was named after a Russian chess champion, and the piece positions in question were from a famous 1910 game), so there's a good chance he put the goof in intentionally. Was it an early hint that there was something wrong with HAL? Was HAL testing his opponent to gauge how observant he was, and if he was willng to question HAL's claims? Or was he indeed dropping intentional clues that something was wrong with him, but this one proved too subtle?
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* HAL 9000 from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. WordOfGod said that he went kill-crazy because he was given conflicting orders about how to treat the crew members. There are two other theories for his motives: he was aware he was going to crash/go nuts and was trying to drop hints to Dave to figure out the secret purpose of the mission; or he, being a perfect computer, felt threatened by the monolith and wanted to keep mankind from acquiring it and reaching a point in evolution where they don't need tools like himself. Naturally, the film itself gives no hints at all.
** HAL screws up at chess early on in the film. He announces that it is checkmate in two moves. It's actually three. Kubrick was a chess enthusiast (the character Dr. Smyslov was named after a Russian chess champion, and the piece positions in question were from a famous 1910 game), so there's a good chance he put the goof in intentionally. Was it an early hint that there was something wrong with HAL? Was HAL testing his opponent to gauge how observant he was, and if he was willng to question HAL's claims? Or was he indeed dropping intentional clues that something was wrong with him, but this one proved too subtle?
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ac
8th Nov '17 11:04:11 AM UchuuFlamenco
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* Captain Nascimento in "Film/TheEliteSquad" has been described as either hero/anti-hero cop relentless in his quest to stop crime or an inhuman psychopath whose objective is to exterminate slum dwelling criminals. A third and more interesting interpretation is that he is neither a hero nor a villain, but rather a victim: the training to which he was subjected in order to be an elite cop and his job take a serious toll on his psychological well being and ultimately his personal life, yet another casualty of the War on Drugs.

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* Captain Nascimento in "Film/TheEliteSquad" ''Film/TheEliteSquad'' has been described as either hero/anti-hero cop relentless in his quest to stop crime or an inhuman psychopath whose objective is to exterminate slum dwelling criminals. A third and more interesting interpretation is that he is neither a hero nor a villain, but rather a victim: the training to which he was subjected in order to be an elite cop and his job take a serious toll on his psychological well being and ultimately his personal life, yet another casualty of the War on Drugs.



* The Duke in "Film/MoulinRouge!" did nothing wrong. He made an agreement with the main characters: He would fund the rebuild of the entire club, all in exchange for sex with Nicole Kidman. This was agreed upon in advance. He held up his end of the bargain; but she didn't do her part, nor did she ever intend to. So they scammed him out of a ton of money, feeling entitled to it because he had money and they didn't. His understandable anger after that led to the violent actions that followed.

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* The Duke in "Film/MoulinRouge!" ''Film/MoulinRouge!'' did nothing wrong. He made an agreement with the main characters: He would fund the rebuild of the entire club, all in exchange for sex with Nicole Kidman. This was agreed upon in advance. He held up his end of the bargain; but she didn't do her part, nor did she ever intend to. So they scammed him out of a ton of money, feeling entitled to it because he had money and they didn't. His understandable anger after that led to the violent actions that followed.
8th Nov '17 7:00:34 AM UchuuFlamenco
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* The 1976 version of "Film/{{Carrie}}" portrays Margaret, Carrie's mother, as a psychotic woman who has made up her own version of Christianity and follows this version to the letter, even misquoting the Bible. She is abusive towards Carrie and never shows her any love, going so far as to say she never wanted Carrie RIGHT IN HER FACE. In the 2013 version of the film, Margaret is still a firm believer of her own version of her religion, but it's made abundantly clear that Carrie means the world to her, even if she can be rude to her at times. An even more important change is the infamous prom sequence. In the 1976 film, Carrie is never shown practising her telekinesis and goes into a trance-like state when shit hits the fan at prom. This makes her character helpless from start to finish, she's not doing anything yet she causes all this mayhem. The 2013 version solves this problem masterfully: Carrie can be seen practising her powers (moving flags while in class, looking up videos on YouTube) and actually has fun with it. She sees it as a gift rather than a curse. In the prom sequence, it's not just Carrie losing control. It's rather the opposite. Carrie takes control by simply having enough of everyone's shit and decides to use her powers against everyone who has wronged her. She simply has had enough and doesn't care anymore, taking matters into her own hand, standing up for herself at last. This completely turns her character around, much like the film did with her mother Margaret. Carrie isn't a helpless victim in this version, she's the hero (or maybe anti-hero, YMMV on that one). Carrie 1976 is the tale of a woman scorned, Carrie 2013 is the tale of a woman scorned and not having any of it.

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* The 1976 version of "Film/{{Carrie}}" ''Film/{{Carrie}}'' portrays Margaret, Carrie's mother, as a psychotic woman who has made up her own version of Christianity and follows this version to the letter, even misquoting the Bible. She is abusive towards Carrie and never shows her any love, going so far as to say she never wanted Carrie RIGHT IN HER FACE. In the 2013 version of the film, Margaret is still a firm believer of her own version of her religion, but it's made abundantly clear that Carrie means the world to her, even if she can be rude to her at times. An even more important change is the infamous prom sequence. In the 1976 film, Carrie is never shown practising her telekinesis and goes into a trance-like state when shit hits the fan at prom. This makes her character helpless from start to finish, she's not doing anything yet she causes all this mayhem. The 2013 version solves this problem masterfully: Carrie can be seen practising her powers (moving flags while in class, looking up videos on YouTube) and actually has fun with it. She sees it as a gift rather than a curse. In the prom sequence, it's not just Carrie losing control. It's rather the opposite. Carrie takes control by simply having enough of everyone's shit and decides to use her powers against everyone who has wronged her. She simply has had enough and doesn't care anymore, taking matters into her own hand, standing up for herself at last. This completely turns her character around, much like the film did with her mother Margaret. Carrie isn't a helpless victim in this version, she's the hero (or maybe anti-hero, YMMV on that one). Carrie 1976 is the tale of a woman scorned, Carrie 2013 is the tale of a woman scorned and not having any of it.



** Also in the Gene Wilder version, Grandpa Joe is played as a beloved, sympathetic character. But after a bout of unfortunate FridgeLogic, it becomes apparent that he's kind of a bastard. Think about it: He spends twenty years lying in bed doing nothing (except consuming tobacco) while Mom takes in laundry, and Charlie busts his ass on a paper route, all so they can barely afford their broken-down shack and cabbage water (which he complains about). But all that changes as soon as the kid finds a magic pass into to the candy factory inside a chocolate bar with money he fished out of a storm drain on his hands and knees. At that point, Grandpa Joe is suddenly able to dance like a broadway veteran, kick up his heels, and sing about how "we've" got a golden ticket, completely dismissing the notion that Charlie might want to take one of his ''actual parents''. Then, when he gets into the factory, he insults the other children, (possibly) gropes Mrs. TeeVee's rump, and encourages Charlie to steal the Fizzy Lifting Drinks...All before berating Mr. Wonka at the end, claiming that Wonka appears to believe himself to be entitled. As in, entitled to decide for himself who to leave his own inheritance to. An inheritance consisting of a company and factory built from the ground up by the genius Willy Wonka. Man...What a DICK!

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** Also in the Gene Wilder version, Grandpa Joe is played as a beloved, sympathetic character. But after a bout of unfortunate FridgeLogic, it becomes apparent that he's kind of a bastard. Think about it: He spends twenty years lying in bed doing nothing (except consuming tobacco) while Mom takes in laundry, and Charlie busts his ass on a paper route, all so they can barely afford their broken-down shack and cabbage water (which he complains about). But all that changes as soon as the kid finds a magic pass into to the candy factory inside a chocolate bar with money he fished out of a storm drain on his hands and knees. At that point, Grandpa Joe is suddenly able to dance like a broadway veteran, kick up his heels, and sing about how "we've" got a golden ticket, completely dismissing the notion that Charlie might want to take one of his ''actual parents''. Then, when he gets into the factory, he insults the other children, (possibly) gropes Mrs. TeeVee's [=TeeVee=]'s rump, and encourages Charlie to steal the Fizzy Lifting Drinks...All before berating Mr. Wonka at the end, claiming that Wonka appears to believe himself to be entitled. As in, entitled to decide for himself who to leave his own inheritance to. An inheritance consisting of a company and factory built from the ground up by the genius Willy Wonka. Man...What a DICK!
3rd Oct '17 7:20:46 AM CosmicFerret
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* ''HardCandy''. Some thought the young girl was just [[KnightTemplar enacting some good old-fashioned (if brutal) street justice]] on pedophiles. More thought she was just a budding young serial killer who was preying on AcceptableTargets to get her own no less despicable (or maybe more despicable) jollies.

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* ''HardCandy''.''Film/HardCandy''. Some thought the young girl was just [[KnightTemplar enacting some good old-fashioned (if brutal) street justice]] on pedophiles. More thought she was just a budding young serial killer who was preying on AcceptableTargets to get her own no less despicable (or maybe more despicable) jollies.
28th Sep '17 10:24:21 PM Shieldage
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* The Film/{{Predator}} may have a lot in common with the snarky humans he fights, according to [[http://thepunchlineismachismo.com/archives/comic/commander-got-to-hoose-beween-taking-french-or-yautja-in-middle-school this comic]] by ''Webcomic/ManlyGuysDoingManlyThings':

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* The Film/{{Predator}} may have a lot in common with the snarky humans he fights, according to [[http://thepunchlineismachismo.com/archives/comic/commander-got-to-hoose-beween-taking-french-or-yautja-in-middle-school this a comic]] by ''Webcomic/ManlyGuysDoingManlyThings':''Webcomic/ManlyGuysDoingManlyThings''.
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