History AffectionateParody / Comics

1st Apr '16 2:38:55 PM ObsidianFire
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* ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'' uses this as well, especially with Victor Mancha, who is programmed to worship in-universe superheroes and often plays straight man to the more GenreSavvy of the group.

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* ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'' uses this as well, especially with Victor Mancha, who is programmed to worship in-universe superheroes and often plays straight man to the more GenreSavvy smarter of the group.
20th Jan '16 9:34:21 PM jormis29
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** The same could be said of his run on ''{{Supreme}}'' which used many goofy Silver Age-style ideas and stories. Extra points for the fact Moore also made ''a parody of a parody'', taking the ''Magazine/{{MAD}}'' Franchise/{{Superman}} parody ''Superduperman'' and writing one based on Supreme, who himself is a Superman analogue.

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** The same could be said of his run on ''{{Supreme}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Supreme}}'' which used many goofy Silver Age-style ideas and stories. Extra points for the fact Moore also made ''a parody of a parody'', taking the ''Magazine/{{MAD}}'' Franchise/{{Superman}} parody ''Superduperman'' and writing one based on Supreme, who himself is a Superman analogue.
20th Dec '15 7:47:59 PM nombretomado
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** ''1963'' is an AffectionateParody of the stories and characters of the SilverAge, but more of a pointed TakeThat to the creators behind them, with the letters pages implying that "Affable" Al Moore (Moore's fictionalised version of himself within the ''1963'' universe and a clear take-off of "Smilin'" Creator/StanLee) is an egotistical tyrant who shamelessly takes credit for the achievements of others.

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** ''1963'' is an AffectionateParody of the stories and characters of the SilverAge, UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}}, but more of a pointed TakeThat to the creators behind them, with the letters pages implying that "Affable" Al Moore (Moore's fictionalised version of himself within the ''1963'' universe and a clear take-off of "Smilin'" Creator/StanLee) is an egotistical tyrant who shamelessly takes credit for the achievements of others.
16th Oct '15 6:24:05 PM DoctorNemesis
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* Largely the point of ''Comicbook/{{Planetary}}'', in which each issue explores a skewed version of a particular pop-culture icon through the eyes of the main characters; Japanese ''kaiju'' movies one issue, 1960s super-spy thrillers another, and so on. It was often PlayedForDrama, however, in that while the writers were clearly affectionate towards many of the things they were drawing upon, they were also willing to criticise as well; to illustrate, one issue featured a group of characters clearly based on the VertigoComics characters of the 1980s and 1990s, and while one of them passionately champions their political and social relevance and edginess, another bluntly points out that when taken out of that specific set of contexts and appearing in the present day, they can't help but look a bit silly.
9th Sep '15 11:29:20 PM 10-13-2
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* BongoComics ''Radioactive Man'' parody of 1980s comics, ''Who Washes the Washmen's Infinite Secrets of Legendary Crossover Knight Wars'', is a shining example of how to do this. It is spot-on and obviously written and illustrated by creators who love those comics. Just as importantly, it is very funny - so funny, in fact, that you don't even have to know what they're parodying to enjoy it.
19th May '15 9:50:32 PM StrixObscuro
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* ''ComicBook/UltimateAdventures'' is a parody of the Franchise/{{Batman}} franchise, in which the vigilante is a deluded billionaire who relies heavily upon his teenaged sidekick.
14th Apr '15 6:23:17 PM nombretomado
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* [[ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes Calvin's]] alter egos are often used to spoof their various genres. Tracer Bullet covers FilmNoir, Spaceman Spiff is a parody of Sci-fi adventure stuff like ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', and Stupendous Man... well, [[Franchise/{{Superman}} guess.]] Occasionally, the comics Calvin was actually reading would be used to give a not-so-affectionate critique of the ultraviolent [[TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age of Comic Books]].

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* [[ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes Calvin's]] alter egos are often used to spoof their various genres. Tracer Bullet covers FilmNoir, Spaceman Spiff is a parody of Sci-fi adventure stuff like ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', and Stupendous Man... well, [[Franchise/{{Superman}} guess.]] Occasionally, the comics Calvin was actually reading would be used to give a not-so-affectionate critique of the ultraviolent [[TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age of Comic Books]].
28th Nov '14 10:50:12 AM Erechel
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* ''[[ComicBook/InodoroPereyraElRenegau Inodoro Pereyra]]'', a comicbook from the Argentinian writer [[Creator/RobertoFontanarrosa "Negro" Fontanarrosa]], is an affectionate parody of ''[[Literature/MartinFierro El Gaucho Martín Fierro]]''.
9th Jun '14 4:10:20 PM RBluefish
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* ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'' is essentially a good-natured sendup of tabletop gamer culture. The creators even produced their own licensed verion of the [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons 1st Edition AD&D rules,]] ''TabletopGame/{{Hackmaster}}''.
5th Jun '14 1:36:25 PM EponymousKid
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* ''Colt Noble and the Megalords'' was a one-shot from Image that is this in regards to ''Franchise/MastersOfTheUniverse'', though very much more "affectionate" than "parody" as it doesn't directly mock any of the elements lifted from He-Man so much as create comical situations around them (such as the characterization of Prince Jaysen/Colt Noble as a horny idiot and Archfiend as the world's worst boyfriend). The continuation in ''Mini Comics Included'' did parody one specific element of the original He-Man toyline: namely, the premise behind He-Man impersonator Faker, who has blue skin and orange hair. The Faker equivalent, Duper, is fired by Archfiend because he can change shape but not colors, but ends up fooling Colt's love interest Mareea because she's colorblind.
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